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Hurricane Dorian

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Hurricane Dorian

Old 4th Sep 2019, 18:44
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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PiF

Good info. Thanks.

I suppose I could have just googled the Trop height in the bahamas area but I guess I was just in a lazy mood!

BV
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Old 4th Sep 2019, 22:42
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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HURRICANE DORIAN

Yesterday I was chasing for professional curiosity the NOAA WP - 3D Orion in its mission inside the hurricane on Flightradar24.
i noticed that, closed to the position of the Orion (flying at 8000ft), there were other two aircraft at much higher altitude, one at 35000ft and the other at 34000 (flying to SJU and PAP, from US airports), while the rest of air traffic was at the external boundary. I was woundering (and ask comments from the audience) in what situation would those aircraft find themselves if, for example, a depressurization world occour, forcing the Flight to descent to 14-10000ft?
Thanks.





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Old 4th Sep 2019, 23:42
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I seriously hope everyone is ok, but one question keeps churning over and over in my mind, why oh why do they keep building wooden buildings?
It's not as if this is something new, but every time I see them nailing chipboard over Windows etc one almost want to scream at them to fit permanent metal shutters that can be lowered / slide over Windows and build something that is storm proof, is it that difficult? The cost involved post storm must be horrendous and that can be severely curtailed by prevention rather than post intervention..
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Old 5th Sep 2019, 00:19
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I don't think you can storm proof for a Cat 5 and a Cat 4 isn't a wimp either.
They'll rip apart pretty well any regular residential or commercial building, no matter the shutters or any other measures.
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Old 5th Sep 2019, 00:27
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I witnessed a lot of engine testing at the P&W Palm Beach facility back in the early 1980's. I always stayed at the Hilton on Jupiter Beach (the Hilton had a deal with Pratt - I could stay there for $35/night which even back then was dirt cheap for a beach front hotel).
Anyway, at the time they were building a couple big high rise condos - literally right on the beach (the places that had been their a while - like the Hilton - were set back a respectable distance with some sort of seawall). Long timers were lamenting how short sighted it was to build that close to the water - said they hadn't had a big hurricane for too long and people had forgotten just how destructive they could be. Said the damage to those fancy new condos would be in the millions the next time they had a big hurricane...
When I grew up in Colorado, there were areas where they were not allowed to build permanent structures because they were known flood plains (and in a big thunderstorm could flood with mere minutes of warning). Many of those same flood plains are now covered with houses and strip malls.
People have an amazingly short memory when it comes to how destructive mother nature can be when she gets mad...
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Old 5th Sep 2019, 02:16
  #26 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by meadowrun View Post
I don't think you can storm proof for a Cat 5 and a Cat 4 isn't a wimp either.
They'll rip apart pretty well any regular residential or commercial building, no matter the shutters or any other measures.
I am ever mindful of the photo in Robert N Buck's book, Weather Flying, of the 10 ft long 3 x 1 that is speared straight through the centre trunk of a palm tree (in Puerto Rico?) like a javelin.
I'd like to see the Myth-busters try replicating that.
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Old 5th Sep 2019, 08:31
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One can fairly easily design and build a house with a frame that can take a hurricane. Flying 2*4 are more of a problem but not difficult just costly. Which is the key word here.

Basically the difference between a glider and a fighter jet. Both stay in one piece most of the time.
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Old 5th Sep 2019, 08:43
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windy.com is a remarkable world-wide resource and is particularly good for storm tracking.



Note the red triangle at the bottom left, which allows animation over the coming week. Also useful for aviation purposes is the slider on the right that adjusts the altitude of the display from the surface up to FL450. There are apps available as well as the website.
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Old 5th Sep 2019, 09:56
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I spent some time in Florida in the late 90’s. Hurricane floyd was a biggie at the time. I asked about building right at the beach. The response I got “oh they’re rich and they know all about the risks. They build flimsy on the beach so they have an excuse to rebuild something new every few years”
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Old 5th Sep 2019, 12:25
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I was looking at them nailing the boards over the windows of one with a veranda and it struck me the air hitting the side has to go somewhere and either around the sides or up is the only routes possible,and up would put so much loading on the roof it's no wonder you see so many roofless, it does not need to breach the walls to take the roof off, and once that is gone the structural integrity has too. Surely berms, sloping walls, flat roofs etc and concrete or brick is the way to go.
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Old 5th Sep 2019, 13:18
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Indai Four Two, I am liking that link. Many thanks.
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Old 5th Sep 2019, 16:25
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https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/in-pictures-49590992


Doors are open, I presume they opened both ends to try and prevent the pressure pulling the roof off etc.
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Old 5th Sep 2019, 16:36
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It won't buff out

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Old 5th Sep 2019, 20:23
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Reports of some shooting and looting after the first day.
Only been a couple of days but already people are short on supplies on islands in hurricane territory in hurricane season. Good planning.

Computer projection model map shows Dorian on a bee-line for the UK now.
No, wait...that's a Sharpie line drawn in on the leading edge. Someone's been messing with the official maps again.
Someone who people look to for accuracy and guidance thinks they're better than NOAA.
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Old 6th Sep 2019, 00:31
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The BBC seem to report this as a 'hurricain',rather than a hurricun'.I wonder why ?
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Old 6th Sep 2019, 00:43
  #36 (permalink)  
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' Hurricain' , 'Hurricun' ???

Try 'Hurricane'
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Old 6th Sep 2019, 03:31
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I suspect it's because the BBC don't speak 'Murricain.
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Old 6th Sep 2019, 03:36
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Another good site is EARTH. You can see a number of atmospheric parameters including wind speed, air temp., ...
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Old 6th Sep 2019, 05:47
  #39 (permalink)  
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I suspect it's because the BBC don't speak 'Murricain.
Good point. ex82 was referring to the spoken word, apologies.
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Old 7th Sep 2019, 03:14
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Originally Posted by Hydromet View Post
I suspect it's because the BBC don't speak 'Murricain.
Shouldn't that be "murricun"?
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