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Are you good?

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Are you good?

Old 8th Jul 2019, 23:15
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Are you good?

Well of course you are good - aren't we all on this site?

But I didn't mean that. When did the standard response to "How are you?" become "I'm good", instead of "I'm well" or "I'm fine"? Not a matter of any moment in the great scheme of things, but language shifts interest me, as they are constantly happening. I reckon I first started noticing it about 20 years ago, but I expect it's older than that. Is it an age thing, or has it crossed the Atlantic at some stage? We had a mention in another thread recently about "can I get" replacing "can I have", and I'm guessing this is about the same age as "I'm good"
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Old 9th Jul 2019, 03:14
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Reckon it's just the fact that the young are impressionable and pick up on these things first. Picked up from the US no doubt. Was confused by ' guys' being applied to women not just men in the 70's, not sure if has fully caught on yet here ( may just be deaf to it now). The one that really jars is ' momentarily' when ' shortly' is meant.
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Old 9th Jul 2019, 03:49
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This stuff can make one nuts.

"He's So Fine" - Chiffons, 1963: He's so "handsome/wavy hair/soft-spoken guy/kinda shy...." Nothing to do with health or well-being, particularly
"She'll be right" - Oz slang for "it'll be OK, no worries," etc.
"Do you want a second helping?" "No, I'm good."
"Everything's good in the 'hood."

I think it is likely something from our Yank culture - if you can't think of anything else, blame it on Seinfeld. Second option, jazz/rock musician slang.

I seem to remember a variation in one of the more grown-up Pixar animations (Cars or Incredibles) where a not-fully-happy character - alone in a brown-study (look that one up!) - says to himself, "I'm Good. **sigh** I'm - good." But that's only a decade old or so.
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Old 9th Jul 2019, 03:57
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I'm not just good, I'm bloody fantastic! Oh my health? Well my knees are decidedly dodgy, then there's...

I've noticed it for some years now, definitely something that has crossed the Atlantic.

Was confused by ' guys' being applied to women not just men in the 70's, not sure if has fully caught on yet here
An asexual "guys" is definitely used in the UK a lot now, my lady friend and I were addressed as such in the pub last week. Not just the young either, one of my less popular senior colleagues always said it when addressing groups - and wasn't Tony Bliar supposed to use it all the time?

Another term of address at work was "team"; eg, group emails would open "Team, please note that..." I generally used "Dear all" when addressing the Nation, team seemed to be... an affectation.
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Old 9th Jul 2019, 04:19
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Guys.

One of the first things I leaned in English class (and I remember it distinctly,) at five years old is that in English the masculine form is used when addressing or describing a mixed sex group. The recent, well relatively recent, and constant outrage about forms of address in these circumstances is entirely misplaced. No disrespect is intended, it is merely correct usage.

While I cringe at split infinitives they are themselves a relatively recent concern, about a hundred years or so. Before that no one cared.

The grammatical error that has me positively spitting at the moment is the appalling lack of manners in putting oneself first as in: "me and Sebastian are going . . . . ." It seems that the more common are becoming more common, as Mummy would say!
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Old 9th Jul 2019, 06:25
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the appalling lack of manners in putting oneself first as in: "me and Sebastian are going
to say nothing of the grammatical error.

First new girlfriend after my divorce, on being asked (banteringly) f she was a good girl...

"When I'm good I'm very good...but when I'm bad I'm better"

(And she was)
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Old 9th Jul 2019, 06:44
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" Are you good? "

Awesome TTN, like, I mean, wicked !
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Old 9th Jul 2019, 07:46
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"Smash July with 10000 per month" Ad received yesterday from National Lottery

"Well done peleton, you've smashed it" - irritating ad on Drama channel...

Smash? I've smashed a few bits of china in me life, the odd window and I'll even say I smashed me knees tripping over on Sunday. Ow.
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Old 9th Jul 2019, 07:46
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Forgot about 'awesome'. Personally hate 'campus' when site is meant.
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Old 9th Jul 2019, 08:03
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Originally Posted by Mr Optimistic View Post
Reckon it's just the fact that the young are impressionable and pick up on these things first. Picked up from the US no doubt. Was confused by ' guys' being applied to women not just men in the 70's, not sure if has fully caught on yet here ( may just be deaf to it now). The one that really jars is ' momentarily' when ' shortly' is meant.
Definitely common. Daughter calls us 'you guy's, it grates. Guys and Dolls, Guys and Girls, Guys and Gals, even any gender specific is being rigidly stamped out.
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Old 9th Jul 2019, 08:06
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I was at a dinner where a teenager was asked if they'd like more potatoes. "I'm fine thanks" was the reply. "I wasn't asking you how you're feeling!" came the sharp retort. ;-)
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Old 9th Jul 2019, 08:09
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Originally Posted by ChrisVJ View Post
they are themselves a relatively recent concern!
they are themselves a relatively recent concern

My English master would always cross these out. Never sure when to use self.



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Old 9th Jul 2019, 09:25
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Hmm, think it must be reflexive, ie referring back...' they are a relatively recent concern to themselves'. Not the original meaning nor sensible but you see what I mean. In your example the word was redundant.
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Old 9th Jul 2019, 10:44
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Standard reply from me after I get a, "I'm good" reply to "how are you"? is "fine, you're well behaved bu how are you"?. That often confuses 'em.

We've lost (or are losing) the words, thoughts, ideas, interpretations, versions. Now it's all "take". "Here is Dolly Daydream's take on "It's over".
Similarly we don't look, listen, taste or feel things anymore. We "check them out",
Am I being petty? I don'y think so, we're just losing the ability to express ourselves - know what I'm saying?


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Old 9th Jul 2019, 11:02
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Nice one Phil.

Over 60 years ago we were not permitted to describe anything as​​​​​ nice.
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Old 9th Jul 2019, 11:18
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Tanker,
When did the standard response to "How are you?" become "I'm good",
I lived in OZ, courtesy of the RAF and BAe, 81-82 and 96-00. The response was standard use; aside from the question being 'How ya going'.
My wife went to the Post Office in Canberra, shortly after her arrival in 97, to post a letter. The PO lady asked 'How ya going?'. My wife replied 'First Class please' !
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Old 9th Jul 2019, 13:49
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My wife replied to much mirth "No I've just come"!
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Old 9th Jul 2019, 18:08
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Mrs PN walked into a US Facility where we had simply walked in the day before. She went to the office she required to get a pass. The first question was "How did you get here?"

The first answer was walked from the hotel. The question was repeated. She tried, bus from the airport. Next she tried BA to Munich and Lufthansa here. Her interrogator amplified the question; how did you get into the building? Still totally lacking understanding, up the steps, through the doors, up the stairs and . . .

Finally he said HOW DID YOU GET PASSED THE GUARDS? I just said "good morning" and walked in. Collapse of TMSgt and BX pass duly issued.
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Old 9th Jul 2019, 18:27
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[QUOTE=Tankertrashnav;1051334

"... but language shifts interest me, as they are constantly happening. I reckon I first started noticing it about 20 years ago, but I expect it's older than that. Is it an age thing, or has it crossed the Atlantic at some stage? We had a mention in another thread recently about "can I get" replacing "can I have", and I'm guessing this is about the same age as "I'm good"[/QUOTE]
TTN; your use of the word "reckon" bought a memory back to me, and I have never really thought much of it until now. My parents/grandparents of WW2 vintage, used to describe simple arithmetic as "reckoning up" - they all lived in the North West of England which during WW2 and afterwards had a considerable US population; I wonder if that use of the word or phrase drifted in with them?
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Old 9th Jul 2019, 19:04
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Originally Posted by TLDNMCL View Post
TTN; your use of the word "reckon" bought a memory back to me, and I have never really thought much of it until now. My parents/grandparents of WW2 vintage, used to describe simple arithmetic as "reckoning up" - they all lived in the North West of England which during WW2 and afterwards had a considerable US population; I wonder if that use of the word or phrase drifted in with them?
Bad English is one of my pet peeves. I once tried to discuss this with an English professor, and was met with the answer that English is an evolving language. I commented that I was taught strict grammar rules in school. She then replied that we must keep changing. I asked why. She babbled on about how English evolves with the way the common people talk. So then I asked her how she justifies her salary if knowledge is fed from the bottom up instead of being taught top-down. She babbled some more double-speak. Is English Language the only intellectual pursuit where the educated learn from the uneducated?

More recently, a friend retired from teaching in the Toronto School board. She told us that they were actually forbidden to teach grammar!

The French have an international symposium every so many years where they re-state the rules of French. They call it the 'La Francophonie'. Perhaps we should get our learned boffins of English together, and between Martinis they could do the same for English. We could call it 'L'Anglophony'

Same thing happened to our Canadian Broadcasting Corporation. Their WX people started talking about 'seasonal' temperatures, as if we only get a temperature once a season. However they still say 'unseasonable' in the negative. When mentioned, I got the same response, 'We have to speak the language of the people'. I commented that I didn't want to be inhospital, or even unreasonal, but it should be feasle to have some rules! I have noticed now that they do not change the sound of 'the' or 'a' when the word following starts with a vowel. It keeps going down hill!

What about a couple of something? Someone was talking about paying off debt in a certain case, saying that that it takes a couple years to pay it off. I asked "what if it were to be just one person, how long would it take?" Came the reply, "I said it would take a couple years."

I think a lot of the problem is TV, spreading false information from ignorant people. People believe what they see on TV! I once worked for the phone company in a prestigious computer room. They made a film of me operating it to sell sell it to clients. The director wanted me to feed the paper tape into a reader the wrong way. (It was a long time ago) I knew how to strip the machine down and put it back together again, but the director said I didn't know how to feed it, I had to do it his way. I have never believed anything I saw in film or TV since.

Once, during my years as Professor of ECE, I asked a girl if she had studied in the UK. She had such a good accent and command of English, even though her name and skin colour spoke of a South Asian heritage. "No," she said, "we used to listen to the BBC back home".

Yes, I remember 'reckon', my Dad used it all the time, and before calculators we had a little book called 'The Ready Reckoner', price 1s6d.
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