Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > PPRuNe Social > Jet Blast
Reload this Page >

Laminate flooring

Jet Blast Topics that don't fit the other forums. Rules of Engagement apply.

Laminate flooring

Old 25th Apr 2019, 14:39
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Cambs
Posts: 89
Laminate flooring

I have been told by 'experts' that any lino over a solid floor must be lifted before laying underlay and a laminate floor, apparently moisture can be drawn up into the laminate; I guess laminate does not breathe as well as carpet. Can anyone out there advise if the same applies to Marley tiles?
Slow Biker is offline  
Old 25th Apr 2019, 19:17
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: BC Canada
Posts: 414
Not sure why there would be enough moisture in lino to affect laminate. The only concern I have is that in a 'wet' area such as kitchen a spill can not dry out through the lino as well as evaporate upwards and the moisture would remain under the laminate eventually causing mold or the laminate to swell. I have seen damage to laminate over vinyl tiles when the dishwasher dumped.however the results were no where as disastrous as with a engineered wood floor!

Some of the new laminates here are '24 hour water resistant,' the water is held on top for mopping up. We also have vinyl plank which lays like laminate (no underlay required) and is totally moisture resistant.
ChrisVJ is offline  
Old 25th Apr 2019, 19:29
  #3 (permalink)  
I don't own this space under my name. I should have leased it while I still could
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Lincolnshire
Age: 76
Posts: 16,553
I took up a laminate floor and there was condensation under the PVC layer.

I had covered the concrete with a thin layer of PVC. On top of that membrane was a thin foam cydhikn layer and the laminate on top.

As I read it, you want to lay laminate on top of Marley tiles. I think you would have a similar issue.

It was noisy from both an acoustic and walking perspective. The decorative layer is thin and potentially easy to damage. I would never lay laminate again.

I also lifted 40 year old Marley. I used a broad bladed wall paper stripper. Some tiles lifted cleanly with no mess leaving just hardened adhesive. Others were harder. I applied heat and they lifted easily too but left a sticky adhesive layer. I spread a thin layer of fine sand (block paving sand). Then the tiler laid tiles.

​​​​​Remember you may have to trim your doors too.
​​​​
Pontius Navigator is online now  
Old 26th Apr 2019, 08:07
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2012
Location: Moscow region
Age: 60
Posts: 497
If laminate is yet an option and not the only solution, perhaps it makes sense to eveluate this one vs. "real wood".
E.g. https://freshome.com/2010/11/01/the-...wood-flooring/

My general concern about laminate is about "chemistry" it produces into the air during its lifetime. Manufacturers of course write that everything is OK and "ecological, but we all read every now and then that some materials that were considered safe some 10-20-30 years ago are now found cancer- or whatever-prone.
A_Van is offline  
Old 26th Apr 2019, 16:58
  #5 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,185
Bamboo is durable, attractive and perhaps competitive in price with laminate. Not fashionable if you are about to sell.
RatherBeFlying is offline  
Old 26th Apr 2019, 23:38
  #6 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2000
Location: No longer in Jurassic Park eating Toblerone....
Posts: 2,651
SB lift everything and start afresh.
Lift everything, let me say it again.
Lift everything and work up from a known base.
Engineered wood (UK terminology for 5mm of composite with a 2-3mm layer of wood bonded to it) is far more stable and durable than laminate. Also twice as expensive,
LowNSlow is offline  
Old 27th Apr 2019, 14:18
  #7 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2016
Location: Ilmington, Warwickshire
Posts: 65
Without turning this into a free ad space, have you considered something like Amtico or Karndean? There’s probably many others on the market too, but if you’re after a wood effect without worrying about the situation it’s being laid in and the ongoing maintainability, I can recommend either. A fine screed ( to ensure a smooth level surface) has to be laid first which takes a couple of days to dry out and then, like laminate, the flooring is laid in glued on strips.

Ours has been down years and has all sorts of abuse; dogs, kids, water leaks, various items dropped on it, but still comes up like new.
BehindBlueEyes is offline  
Old 27th Apr 2019, 16:01
  #8 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Here
Posts: 286
Originally Posted by BehindBlueEyes View Post
Without turning this into a free ad space, have you considered something like Amtico or Karndean? Thereís probably many others on the market too, but if youíre after a wood effect without worrying about the situation itís being laid in and the ongoing maintainability, I can recommend either. A fine screed ( to ensure a smooth level surface) has to be laid first which takes a couple of days to dry out and then, like laminate, the flooring is laid in glued on strips.

Ours has been down years and has all sorts of abuse; dogs, kids, water leaks, various items dropped on it, but still comes up like new.
Another vote for Amtico, attractive and durable.
yellowtriumph is offline  
Old 27th Apr 2019, 18:00
  #9 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Bolton ENGLAND
Age: 74
Posts: 899
Originally Posted by LowNSlow View Post
SB lift everything and start afresh.
Lift everything, let me say it again.
Lift everything and work up from a known base. ,
Endorse this, it is correct advice. It is contained in several Codes of Practice for the installation of floorcoverings.

Planemike is offline  
Old 27th Apr 2019, 18:42
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: West Wiltshire, UK
Age: 66
Posts: 369
Originally Posted by RatherBeFlying View Post
Bamboo is durable, attractive and perhaps competitive in price with laminate. Not fashionable if you are about to sell.
I bonded bamboo flooring down when we built our house. Nearly killed my knees, and the price of the Sikabond adhesive was eye watering, but the result has been a really tough floor, with none of the noises etc that you tend to get with a floating laminate floor. Having laid floating laminate flooring in the kitchen at our old house, I have to say that I was really disappointed with the stuff. It marked relatively easily, started making noises after it had been down for a few months, and looked really scruffy after a couple of years. The bamboo seem to be wearing a lot better, with no marks on it at all yet, despite it having been down since the time that the house was still under construction, so has put up with work boots, sawdust etc without any problems at all. Bonding it down was a good move, too, especially upstairs, where the floors now seem really solid.
VP959 is online now  
Old 28th Apr 2019, 15:17
  #11 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,185
In my case, the bamboo was laid directly over the subfloor (previously carpet) with a floor nailer.

The stuff was Ĺ" thick as I recall.
RatherBeFlying is offline  
Old 28th Apr 2019, 15:37
  #12 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2002
Location: West Wiltshire, UK
Age: 66
Posts: 369
The bamboo I laid downstairs is on a concrete floor with underfloor heating pipes, so nailing wouldn't have been a good idea! As I had to bond the stuff down on the ground floor, I opted to do the same upstairs as well. Ours is the same thickness from the sound of it, 12mm, tongue and grooved boards.
VP959 is online now  
Old 28th Apr 2019, 16:50
  #13 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Cambs
Posts: 89
Many thanks for the advice. Whatever we choose, the tiles are coming up to expose the base. We have always had carpets, so I had little knowledge of alternatives apart from laminate; now, having looked at Amtico we start again. I knew the answer would be out there.
SB
Slow Biker is offline  
Old 28th Apr 2019, 19:30
  #14 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: ESSEX
Posts: 212
If it’s a solid floor tile it
SARF is offline  
Old 28th Apr 2019, 19:53
  #15 (permalink)  
I don't own this space under my name. I should have leased it while I still could
 
Join Date: Dec 2002
Location: Lincolnshire
Age: 76
Posts: 16,553
Originally Posted by SARF View Post
If itís a solid floor tile it
We had a choice and opted for tile over screed and Wet UFH. My son in law opted for oak timber.
We had laminate, never again.
His oak looked good but started to show some wear in traffic areas.
Our tiles look good and are warm under foot with the UFH.
Tiles are less forgiving if you drop a cup or plate on them.
​​​​His latest project in his new home is tile.

I won't say where but you can get 0% credit on tiles, you can also get 15% if your tiler can get a discount. Expect to pay £20-£25 per as metre plus adhesive for having them laid.
Pontius Navigator is online now  
Old 28th Apr 2019, 19:58
  #16 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: ESSEX
Posts: 212
Buy cheap buy twice..

get quality tiles.. find a quality tiler and pay up..
‘then buy rugs and bin every two years
SARF is offline  
Old 28th Apr 2019, 20:01
  #17 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2012
Location: ESSEX
Posts: 212
Obviously if the house is worth it. Don’t spend a few grand on a ground floor flat
SARF is offline  
Old 29th Apr 2019, 17:02
  #18 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2001
Location: Toronto
Posts: 2,185
When taking out old carpet, wear at least a dust mask.
RatherBeFlying is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

Copyright © 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.