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BREXIT

Old 27th Feb 2020, 13:00
  #4821 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Sallyann1234 View Post
No-one has claimed that "China has higher food standards than the US". We all know that isn't true, and it wasn't said above.

What was correctly said is that the US allows use of Ractopamine, which falls below even the low Chinese standards. If China falls in with the other 159 countries that also ban the stuff, that is a pretty good indicator it is not fit to be used.
Well as has already been pointed out New Zealand and Canada allow its use and, this is just a personal opinion of course, I would much rather trust the food standards of those countries than China.
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Old 27th Feb 2020, 13:02
  #4822 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Cornish Jack View Post
So why the issue over Chlorinated Chicken? - after all people are not going to rush out and buy something that is more expensive and arguably of lower quality
This appropriately named contributor makes a valid case for his area of interest - profit above all else. Unsurprisingly, he/she ignores the more obvious consequences - our 'Government's' antipathy towards the less well-off. Apart from the domestic budget imperative of the lowest paid, the lack of (and intentional reduction of) resources for such as schools, hospitals etc., will drive that section of the population into the grubby rip-off section of our 'entrepreneurs'. "Let them eat cake"
Well if that were true then the less well off would be the last people to eat Chlorinated chicken because it is higher in price than non-chlorinated chicken. Apparently.

Chlorinated Chicken would be the preserve of the rich and famous.
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Old 27th Feb 2020, 15:56
  #4823 (permalink)  
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How to cut off your nose to spite your face......simple !.....lets start with our "taking back control " and something called the European Arrest Warrant...

https://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/...arrest-warrant
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Old 27th Feb 2020, 16:09
  #4824 (permalink)  
 
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Having read through the histrionic preamble from various people, you get to the important part of the article:

The UK’s loss of the EAW became inevitable after Brexit; the treaty only applies to EU member states. Both sides are looking for alternative arrangements to surrender criminal suspects and convicted offenders. The EU wants to establish “effective arrangements” for extradition, while the UK would like an agreement based on EU surrender agreement with Norway and Iceland, which came into force in 2019.
In actuality the government is doing what it is supposed to be doing by looking at ways of converting EU laws that no longer apply to the UK now we have left, and already have an alternative that the EU is happy with and the UK has put forward as a valid alternative that does the same job.
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Old 27th Feb 2020, 16:42
  #4825 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by Exrigger View Post
Having read through the histrionic preamble from various people, you get to the important part of the article:



In actuality the government is doing what it is supposed to be doing by looking at ways of converting EU laws that no longer apply to the UK now we have left, and already have an alternative that the EU is happy with and the UK has put forward as a valid alternative that does the same job.
Actually, you don't. Your selective quote is precisely that, a quote you suggest summarises the whole article content. Which it doesn't.

Contributors should read the article in full , gritted teeth optional for some as it's in the Guardian, for a considerably more pertinent analysis.
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Old 27th Feb 2020, 17:20
  #4826 (permalink)  
 
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Actually I did read the whole article, and assume you are saying that the article, in the main, has little to do with the EAW which includes the extradition process, and that it is no longer valid for the UK as a Non-EU member now, or that the EU/UK is looking to replace the EAW with something similar, given that the headline of the article states:

UK to withdraw from European arrest warrant

The remainder of the article appears to be making assumptions about the government on security arrangements that need to be re-negotiated, as they expire in 6 months, and I would assume include EU specific laws/regulations that also will not apply anymore to the UK, again this is a separate subject to what the Guardian story was alluding to by its title and a good part of the article which included my quoted part.

However, as always, I bow to those who interpret said articles as they consider pertinent to their outlook and their belief that I am wrong in some way just because I do not see it the same way.
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Old 27th Feb 2020, 17:40
  #4827 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by Exrigger View Post
Actually I did read the whole article, and assume you are saying that the article, in the main, has little to do with the EAW which includes the extradition process, and that it is no longer valid for the UK as a Non-EU member now, or that the EU/UK is looking to replace the EAW with something similar, given that the headline of the article states:




The remainder of the article appears to be making assumptions about the government on security arrangements that need to be re-negotiated, as they expire in 6 months, and I would assume include EU specific laws/regulations that also will not apply anymore to the UK, again this is a separate subject to what the Guardian story was alluding to by its title and a good part of the article which included my quoted part.

However, as always, I bow to those who interpret said articles as they consider pertinent to their outlook and their belief that I am wrong in some way just because I do not see it the same way.
Actually, with regard to your last sentence, I'm somebody who is perfectly happy with people making their own interpretations, even if they are wrong, unlike some who have the expectation everybody will think as they do or will be told to think in the same manner.

The article was not misleading, neither did it resort to histrionics , the tabloid rags forte, not the Guardians, and contained valid concerns from a variety of credible sources.
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Old 28th Feb 2020, 18:16
  #4828 (permalink)  
 
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Chlorinated chicken because it is higher in price
I have seen nothing whatsoever to suggest that - indeed I would be happy were it so. However the thought that our Transatlantic cousins might invest extra resources in quality control of foodstuffs when McD's and pizzas are the menu of choice, beggars belief! The post Brexit enthusiasm for allowing imports of this particular version of chicken owes more to the potential for profit than aid for stretched budgets. I earnestly look forward to being proved wrong in this respect! ... and the prospect of Marcus Wareing rushing to incorporate such delights in his fine dining.
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Old 28th Feb 2020, 19:12
  #4829 (permalink)  
 
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So Boris is basically telling it's neighbours to f off and is spreading doubt that the UK will honour a treaty that the UK only just signed. Not a good start.

There are three countries in the world who can do that: USA, China and Russia. The UK, despite it's history and current status can't do that unpunished.

Boris is being childish, or thinking he's still running an election campaign, just like Unca Donald. This is costing international respect.

The UK has always been a sovereign country. Being member of a union is like marriage, you give and take. UK is still bound by a number of obligations. If e.g. Finland gets attacked, the UK is bound to send troops. But having to comply with e.g. aviation standards that the UK has been part of developing and agreeing is not acceptable.

UK people running businesses that ex- or import stuff from/to neighboring countries, or people working for such outfits must be biting their nails...

It seems the UK wants to be left alone to sort out what it really wants, and it looks like that it shall.
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Old 28th Feb 2020, 21:38
  #4830 (permalink)  
 
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I just have a feeling that a No Deal Brexit is going to be the final ingredient that turns the corona virus crisis into a catastrophe that will make the 2008 crash look like a little local difficulty.
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Old 28th Feb 2020, 21:41
  #4831 (permalink)  
 
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Not only does Boris seem to have no wish to even start negotiations with the EU but he doesn't seem particularly interested in looking after his domestic voters, nor his nationals overseas ... be it the Corona virus situation or the erosion of voting rights in any country. His behaviour seems petulant at best, and I only hope that the damage done after his term of office can somehow be reversed. Perhaps the population of the UK needs more help than it thinks ... or is likely to get.

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Old 28th Feb 2020, 21:51
  #4832 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by dr dre View Post
Food prices in Germany are already lower than the UK:

https://www.numbeo.com/cost-of-livin...United+Kingdom
really. Did they cover all of both countries. Were variations in rent taken into account at restaurants.. were excise duties on beer adjusted for ?
Did they allow for the variation of the choice of food on offer.
‘post brexit food will be cheaper in the UK .. regardless of what the Germans pay for sausage and dry rolls
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Old 28th Feb 2020, 22:02
  #4833 (permalink)  
 
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post brexit food will be cheaper in the UK .. regardless of what the Germans pay for sausage and dry rolls
.... but have you considered the quality of the sausage meat .... and not all German rolls are dry ....
It's often the case that cross-border food shopping is not only linked to price differentials, but quality and diversity!
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Old 28th Feb 2020, 22:27
  #4834 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Cornish Jack View Post
Chlorinated chicken because it is higher in price
I have seen nothing whatsoever to suggest that - indeed I would be happy were it so.

Post #4811 from 'dr dre'

"And how could the food prices possibly fall in the UK? For one transport costs are greatly increased compared to the EU, and then there’s the blunt truth that good in the US isn’t cheaper than the UK already, as this shows:"
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Old 29th Feb 2020, 07:47
  #4835 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Alsacienne View Post
.... but have you considered the quality of the sausage meat .... and not all German rolls are dry ....
It's often the case that cross-border food shopping is not only linked to price differentials, but quality and diversity!
Absolutely right! That's why there are some products that we buy from France and Germany in particular that we bring back home and use in our every day cooking. The breadth of choice in German and French supermarkets (the bigger ones, not the "discounters") is greater than we get here in UK, and the predominance of "ready meals" in UK grocers is not replicated in many mainland European countries where the art of home cooking appears not to have died out, even though they too, live "busy lives".
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Old 29th Feb 2020, 08:32
  #4836 (permalink)  
 
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Notts - it was so but across Europe people are moving in the British direction - sandwiches bought and brought back to the office for lunch, eating separately and not en-famille. The rise of places like Pret-a-manger. and sushi bars

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Old 29th Feb 2020, 08:36
  #4837 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by ATNotts View Post
Absolutely right! That's why there are some products that we buy from France and Germany in particular that we bring back home and use in our every day cooking. The breadth of choice in German and French supermarkets (the bigger ones, not the "discounters") is greater than we get here in UK, and the predominance of "ready meals" in UK grocers is not replicated in many mainland European countries where the art of home cooking appears not to have died out, even though they too, live "busy lives".
" Ready meals " would be a perfect example of how food which is currently prevented by the UK's standards from entering the supply chain would now become a source the consumer would have no idea as to the origins and quality.

Quite why, apart from being lazy and gullible to adverting / marketing strategies the British consume so many is a puzzle. They all tend to be bland, boring and tasteless. As for German rolls being dry. clearly the poster has never eaten any.
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Old 29th Feb 2020, 09:22
  #4838 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by cashash View Post
Post #4811 from 'dr dre'

"And how could the food prices possibly fall in the UK? For one transport costs are greatly increased compared to the EU, and then there’s the blunt truth that good in the US isn’t cheaper than the UK already, as this shows:"
US

vs

UK
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Old 29th Feb 2020, 10:19
  #4839 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Krystal n chips View Post
" Ready meals " would be a perfect example of how food which is currently prevented by the UK's standards from entering the supply chain would now become a source the consumer would have no idea as to the origins and quality.

Quite why, apart from being lazy and gullible to adverting / marketing strategies the British consume so many is a puzzle. They all tend to be bland, boring and tasteless. As for German rolls being dry. clearly the poster has never eaten any.
I agree, German rolls are some of the tastiest rolls you'll get anywhere, and the variety on the average breakfast buffet is tremendous. Add to that the choice of cheeses, cold meats, cereals, yogurts, cakes, eggs (done in a variety of different ways) and decent coffee and to me a German breakfast gives the "full English" a real run for it's money - I'd go as far as to say I prefer it.

It wasn't always so however, go back 20 or so years are getting a fresh bread roll on a Sunday was a rarity, as were cooked eggs, unless they were boiled - that is boiled rock hard!!
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Old 29th Feb 2020, 10:53
  #4840 (permalink)  
 
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FACT - There is considerable enthusiasm among UK importers (NOT producers!) to allow this form of chicken to be imported.
FACT - I am unaware of ANY UK food distributor who operates as a 'not-for-profit' outlet.
QED
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