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"Public School" Boys.

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"Public School" Boys.

Old 31st Jan 2019, 08:23
  #41 (permalink)  
 
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I have a rather different take on schooling. At my primary school I was always in the top two in the main subjects in exams. I'm guessing that this was because I am good at maths and have a very retentive memory. My parents were shocked that I didn't get a grammar school place. We didn't have an 11+ in the year that I went up and the headmaster chose those he wished to go. Interestingly it was split 9/3 between girls and boys, maybe reflecting his habit of sitting comely eleven year old girls in his lap!

Anyway, when I got to SecMod it was clear that this had happened all over town and that the Chosen ones had maybe been selected on criteria other than intelligence. The unintended consequence of this was that those who had been deselected formed an elite at the SecMod. A disproportionate number of those went on to over achieve so I think that in a way what occurred was a creation of this Public School Effect in a different environment. I must admit that something that went with it was a kind of arrogance too, so maybe it's inevitable.
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Old 31st Jan 2019, 08:24
  #42 (permalink)  
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On accents, I noticed how among officer aircrew any accents tended to homogenize to one pan accent. I put this down to the size of the aircrew cadre and the limited interaction with ORs. In fact where Ops Assistants etc worked predominantly with aircrew their accent, if any, would fade too.

I knew one RO on my nav course who had been encouraged to take elocution lessons to loose his Brummie accent if he wanted to get on. He did and retired as a sqn ldr. Initially his new accent was rather odd but that changed over time.
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Old 31st Jan 2019, 18:28
  #43 (permalink)  
 
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Lonewolf_50

Ive only just seen your post. Youre absolutely right. I have no right to expect grown up conversation on this forum. I dont know what I was thinking.

Withdrawing back to my own little world again now.

BV
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Old 1st Feb 2019, 05:20
  #44 (permalink)  
 
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My experience of boarding school goes back to the 60's where discipline was the order of the day. Education came second. If the staff and prefects did to what they used to do today they would be jailed for gross abuse.
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Old 1st Feb 2019, 06:35
  #45 (permalink)  
 
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I remember the late Digby Mackworth in our first public speaking exercise at OTU, telling us of the punishments meted out at his English public school. We Australian state school ex-students were shocked at the brutality that was accepted there, even though our schools were pretty savage in those days.
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Old 1st Feb 2019, 09:04
  #46 (permalink)  
 
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Roger Cooper who was arrested in Iran in 1985 and then spent 5 years in an Iranian prison said on his release, "Anyone who has been to an English Public School can survive an Iranian gaol."
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Old 1st Feb 2019, 09:22
  #47 (permalink)  
 
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My 2 boys were local state village (very good) primary, and scholarship independent secondary. The second, because his school didn't do the A levels he wanted, announced he would do 6th form at a London state college (living with his brother. When asked did his brother know, said 'I haven't told him yet'.)

During his first term there, one of the girls in has class said (apropos his unwanted advice) 'it's all right for you mature students'. In his first job, working for the Home Office Immigration Dept., the office were asked to send a 'responsible officer' to reception where the security chap was having trouble with a large gentleman of Caribbean extraction; he calmly went and sorted things out. (I'm not sure if the rest of the office were waiting to hear the outcome).

The attitude to life taught in a good school has pluses as well as minuses.
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Old 1st Feb 2019, 10:02
  #48 (permalink)  
 
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This seems an odd thread. Has the feel of a troll to invite scorn and dump opprobrium on a minority who had no more choice in their education than other minorities have on their gender, colour, ethnicity, sexual orientation and (in many cases) religion.

I attended a small, 400 pupil, secondary modern in semi-rural Derbyshire (not far from where our favourite class warrior has washed up). The great majority of pupils in a year group left at 15/16; very few stayed on for O/A levels.

My children and grandchildren attended/attend state schools. But, like many on here I have close acquaintances, work colleagues and family friends who went to public school and/or sent their children to public school. My son-in-law went to public school. I have also spent the last 20 years in teaching environments that have a significant number of ex-public school pupils.

Of course I have met and worked with a few arrogant people who turned out to be ex public school pupils. But, on balance, I reckon I have encountered far more people with a chip on their shoulder.
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Old 1st Feb 2019, 10:19
  #49 (permalink)  
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For some reason I've just remembered Michael - I beg his Eminence's pardon - SIR Michael Palin's excellent character from Ripping Yarns, School Bully played by Ian Ogilvy...

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Old 1st Feb 2019, 10:44
  #50 (permalink)  
 
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"You miserable little tick!" Palin eventually gets the job when Ogilvy goes off to take up the post of school bully at Eton. Very funny.

I once met a teacher who had been on the staff at Cheltenham College at the time when Lindsey Anderson made the film "If" there, his satire on public school education. Apparently the head and governors, attracted by the money on offer, were happy to allow the film to be shot there during the summer vacation. They were less than happy when they saw the result, and thought they had been conned. Very good film though.
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Old 1st Feb 2019, 10:52
  #51 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Dutystude View Post
I attended a small, 400 pupil, secondary modern in semi-rural Derbyshire (not far from where our favourite class warrior has washed up).
Hes emigrated to Staffordshire, please try and keep up (although hes been rather quiet of late) !
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Old 1st Feb 2019, 11:09
  #52 (permalink)  
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"If" is a superb film - particularly the late Graham Crowden arriving in class on his bicycle.

I went to a private boarding school - one of those places where the word "class" only applied to a group of peers being taught a particular subject in a particular room; we had people from all walks of life and depth of pocket, many kids from parental overseas postings (there was quite a Kenyan cadre, black and white!) and best of all, girls!
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Old 1st Feb 2019, 11:27
  #53 (permalink)  
 
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Still have the soundtrack to IF on vinyl.

Unlikely that we will see this shown on terrestrial TV but, if (see what I did there) you are interested, there is a very poor copy on YouTube.
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Old 1st Feb 2019, 17:16
  #54 (permalink)  
 
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I have a DVD of the film which includes an interview with a number of those who took part on both sides of the camera. Malcolm MacDowell recalled filming the fantasy scene in the transport cafe where Travis ends up rolling on the floor with the waitress, played by Christine Noonan. Originally they were to remain fully clothed, but MacDowell suggested to director Lindsey Anderson that it might be improved if they were to end up naked. Andersen replied "OK, but you have to ask Christine". MacDowell did just that, and was rather pleased when she replied "I dont mind!"
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Old 1st Feb 2019, 17:34
  #55 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Dutystude View Post
Unlikely that we will see this shown on terrestrial TV but, if (see what I did there) you are interested, there is a very poor copy on YouTube.
It has certainly been shown in the past on terrestrial TV.
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Old 1st Feb 2019, 19:54
  #56 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by DaveReidUK View Post
It has certainly been shown in the past on terrestrial TV.
I missed that.

My son has the DVD. Think I might borrow it for a bit of nostalgia.
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Old 2nd Feb 2019, 16:55
  #57 (permalink)  

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"If" was brilliant. Reminded me of my Public School - right back in the days of fagging and floggings.
"I know you're up to mischief Mac, though I can't prove it. So I'm just going to flog you on general principles"

Went to a "Prep" school before that - now that WAS a nightmare - Dickens would have recognised it.
Savage bullying, sodomy, rotting food, cold (ice on the washbasins in the morning), brutal beatings.
Mockney was fashionable, along with casual vandalism of anything vandalisable.

Never learned anything much, apart from a degree of low cunning and how to lie successfully

Mac

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Old 2nd Feb 2019, 17:16
  #58 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by Mac the Knife View Post
"If" was brilliant. Reminded me of my Public School - right back in the days of fagging and floggings.
"I know you're up to mischief Mac, though I can't prove it. So I'm just going to flog you on general principles"

Went to a "Prep" school before that - now that WAS a nightmare - Dickens would have recognised it.
Savage bullying, sodomy, rotting food, cold (ice on the washbasins in the morning), brutal beatings.
Mockney was fashionable, along with casual vandalism of anything vandalisable.

Never learned anything much, apart from a degree of low cunning and how to lie successfully

Mac

But you clearly managed to avoid a career in politics or the military despite being eminently qualified for both......

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Old 2nd Feb 2019, 20:55
  #59 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Dutystude View Post
I attended a small, 400 pupil, secondary modern in semi-rural Derbyshire (not far from where our favourite class warrior has washed up). The great majority of pupils in a year group left at 15/16; very few stayed on for O/A levels.
I attended a small Grammar School in Derbyshire (New Mills) but wasted my time there as I had no conception of education, learning or progression. And if your surname wasn't Bradley, Larkum or one or two other notable local families you were unlikely to "get on". Fortunately I left at 16 with 3 "O" levels and got out of the place by joining the RAF as a Boy Entrant Telegraphist, 12 years later that training & experience let me join the Civil Service as a Radio Officer and I retired as an HEO in 2003.
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Old 3rd Feb 2019, 07:34
  #60 (permalink)  
 
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A question from a colonial who attended a "private school": Why are UK private schools known as "public schools" which are really the antithesis of what they really are. Here in Oz "public schools" are those operated by the Government of the various states and which are open to all, regardless of socio economic class.

Is there a rational explanation?
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