Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > PPRuNe Social > Jet Blast
Reload this Page >

Paragraphs

Jet Blast Topics that don't fit the other forums. Rules of Engagement apply.

Paragraphs

Old 9th Dec 2018, 13:23
  #21 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Glasgow
Posts: 196
Originally Posted by nomorecatering View Post

Whats with this new trend in journalism

Where every new sentence is it's own paragraph.
Seeing you've started a thread appertaining to grammar - in your opening sentence, "whats" lacked its required apostrophe and further, the whole sentence needed a question mark.

Also, "it's", with an apostrophe, can only mean "it is" or "it has", nothing else. However, the possessive case, "its", never has an apostrophe. Not many people know that - particularly it seems, amongst PPRuNers! To verify, just type "it's or its" into your search engine.
seafire6b is offline  
Old 9th Dec 2018, 13:47
  #22 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Cambridge, England, EU
Posts: 3,438
Originally Posted by seafire6b View Post
Also, "it's", with an apostrophe, can only mean "it is" or "it has", nothing else. However, the possessive case, "its", never has an apostrophe. Not many people know that - particularly it seems, amongst PPRuNers! To verify, just type "it's or its" into your search engine.
Primary school English. So anyone who gets that wrong can't have done primary school English. So English can't be their native language, right? - wrong, it seems, as foreigners seem to be far less likely to get this wrong than people who supposedly have attended a UK primary school.
Gertrude the Wombat is offline  
Old 9th Dec 2018, 14:57
  #23 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Location: Location!
Posts: 2,141
Originally Posted by ian16th View Post
I'm pleased that I am not alone.
I had to Giggle it.
Now try looking up "exhaustipated" - if you're not too tired!

Jack
Union Jack is online now  
Old 9th Dec 2018, 21:18
  #24 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Out in the sticks in DE56
Age: 83
Posts: 559
Originally Posted by Gertrude the Wombat View Post
Primary school English. So anyone who gets that wrong can't have done primary school English. So English can't be their native language, right? - wrong, it seems, as foreigners seem to be far less likely to get this wrong than people who supposedly have attended a UK primary school.
Sadly, from my observations, there seem to be many primary schools which don't teach primary school English nowadays. (Discuss)
jimtherev is offline  
Old 9th Dec 2018, 21:29
  #25 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Cambridge, England, EU
Posts: 3,438
Originally Posted by jimtherev View Post
Sadly, from my observations, there seem to be many primary schools which don't teach primary school English nowadays. (Discuss)
Actually I think you've got a point there.

I was once involved in an exercise to give a bunch of computer science students some real-world advice about looking for a job once they'd finished their degree. We happened to mention in passing that "of course you had to get that sort of grammar right" otherwise the CV would go straight from the in tray to the bin - recruiters can spot things like that at a glance without actually reading the CV.

These kids started looking worried, then one of them put his hand up: "please sir, nobody has ever taught us that stuff".
Gertrude the Wombat is offline  
Old 10th Dec 2018, 05:05
  #26 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: adelaide australia
Posts: 272
Possessive apostrophes do my head in. I wish i'd never learned the contraction.

So many possessive apostrophes have been misused and abused in signage that they stand out like a dog's bollocks and I have an almost irresistable urge to correct them.
gileraguy is offline  
Old 10th Dec 2018, 08:13
  #27 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Glasgow
Posts: 196
gileraguy yep, but it's worth it. For instance - in written text and at a glance, you instantly know the difference between the dog's bollocks and the dogs' bollocks!
seafire6b is offline  
Old 10th Dec 2018, 09:23
  #28 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: Great South East, tired and retired
Posts: 3,735
Yeah, but its the dogs bollock's that get's me in the head...drive's me crazy...
Ascend Charlie is online now  
Old 10th Dec 2018, 10:35
  #29 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Perth, WESTERN AUSTRALIA
Age: 69
Posts: 846
WingNut60 is offline  
Old 10th Dec 2018, 10:58
  #30 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2007
Location: England
Posts: 450
Originally Posted by gileraguy View Post
Possessive apostrophes do my head in. I wish i'd never learned the contraction.

So many possessive apostrophes have been misused and abused in signage that they stand out like a dog's bollocks and I have an almost irresistable urge to correct them.
You mean like this one?
Moped Scroat's and the new tactics by the Met.... Ram Them
Sallyann1234 is offline  
Old 10th Dec 2018, 11:15
  #31 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 1999
Location: England
Posts: 1,042
Originally Posted by gileraguy View Post
Possessive apostrophes do my head in. I wish i'd never learned the contraction.

So many possessive apostrophes have been misused and abused in signage that they stand out like a dog's bollocks and I have an almost irresistable urge to correct them.
Why not get rid of apostrophes? They generate more trouble than they're worth. They're undetectable in spoken language so why include them in written language? In cases such as the ambiguity relating to Uncle Jack and his horse the solution is to express the intent unambiguously in words which do not require apostrophes. The Spanish and German languages manage without them.
Discorde is offline  
Old 10th Dec 2018, 12:12
  #32 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Glasgow
Posts: 196
Discorde, by its very nature, written language must be more precise. These two statements (repeated from a DaveReidUK post), have entirely different meanings:

"Not forgetting the famous American example, regarding the difference between

a business that knows its shit, and

a business that knows it's shit"

seafire6b is offline  
Old 10th Dec 2018, 12:18
  #33 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: south of Cirencester, north of Lyneham
Age: 75
Posts: 1,261
I had a manager - quite a telented engineer of about my age - whose written English was so appalling because of the mis-use of grammar that all of us in the group would have to ask him what information he really meant to convey.
radeng is offline  
Old 10th Dec 2018, 12:28
  #34 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2006
Location: Lemonia. Best Greek in the world
Posts: 1,731
My elder daughter when she was younger wrote some great little stories, full of imagination and colour. But without paragraphs.
It took ages to get her to use paragraphs.
Ancient Observer is offline  
Old 10th Dec 2018, 13:27
  #35 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 1999
Location: England
Posts: 1,042
Originally Posted by seafire6b View Post
Discorde, by its very nature, written language must be more precise. These two statements (repeated from a DaveReidUK post), have entirely different meanings:

"Not forgetting the famous American example, regarding the difference between

a business that knows its shit, and

a business that knows it's shit"

If the sentence you quote was spoken to you you'd deduce the meaning from the context. If you're expressing an opinion in writing, then choose an alternative form of words so the meaning is clear and unambiguous.

The purpose of language is communication.
Discorde is offline  
Old 10th Dec 2018, 16:56
  #36 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Glasgow
Posts: 196
Originally Posted by Discorde View Post
If the sentence you quote was spoken to you you'd deduce the meaning from the context. If you're expressing an opinion in writing, then choose an alternative form of words so the meaning is clear and unambiguous.
The purpose of language is communication.
However to "choose an alternative form of words so the meaning is clear and unambiguous" could often and unnecessarily lengthen written communications. If I may say, even within that sentence, your use of the words "clear and unambiguous" is an example of tautology, and unnecessarily lengthening the message.

When writing, I simply the follow the rule of imagining myself in the recipient's place. It's by no means limited to "expressing an opinion". It might equally be a report, an instruction, directions or a description - or even a just quick handwritten note. That maxim applies particularly when corresponding with people I don't know personally; it's then obviously important to use clear, concise and grammatically correct English. For instance, "the lady's handbags" or "the ladies' handbags" - prove that use of the simple apostrophe instantly informs specific detail - avoiding ambiguity, essential in written language. All that, yet without additional text or even "an alternative form of words", which would merely clarify what a missing apostrophe would have signified!

That's effective communication.
seafire6b is offline  
Old 10th Dec 2018, 20:25
  #37 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2014
Location: Surrey
Age: 64
Posts: 185
Slight thread-drift,but I'll post here anyway,as we seem to now be talking about unambiguous communication.

I used to travel frequently to the Midlands.and used to return via M40 and A34.On the slip-road from the motorway,there was for years (perhaps still is),a sign which read: FOR A34 NEWBURY USE BOTH LANES.
Am I alone in thinking that the only way to comply with this instruction,would be to straddle the white lines in the centre of the road ? I really wanted to,but never did.
The substitution of the word 'BOTH' with 'EITHER',for the sake of only 2 additional letters would have spared me much anxiety.
ex82watcher is offline  
Old 10th Dec 2018, 20:42
  #38 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: Bedford, UK
Age: 68
Posts: 1,292
That's not a new trend, been that way for years. Reflects their audience.
Mr Optimistic is offline  
Old 10th Dec 2018, 21:59
  #39 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Reading, UK
Posts: 13,819
Originally Posted by ex82watcher View Post
I used to travel frequently to the Midlands.and used to return via M40 and A34.On the slip-road from the motorway,there was for years (perhaps still is),a sign which read: FOR A34 NEWBURY USE BOTH LANES.
Am I alone in thinking that the only way to comply with this instruction, would be to straddle the white lines in the centre of the road ? I really wanted to,but never did.
It's only a problem if you think the sign is aimed at you specifically, as an individual. If, as seems more likely, it's a collective instruction to everyone, then provided there is at least some traffic in each lane you are all complying.

for the sake of only 2 additional letters would have spared me much anxiety
Try not to fret about it.
DaveReidUK is online now  
Old 10th Dec 2018, 22:09
  #40 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Perth, WESTERN AUSTRALIA
Age: 69
Posts: 846
There are those (my brother, for example) who sometimes seem incapable of speaking unambiguously, let alone writing unambiguously.
Even when prompted repeatedly they (he) can find multiple responses to express an answer to a simple question such that the it's never fully answered.
Absolutely infuriating. Yet, I don't think that he's doing it intentionally.

It may have something to do with previous exposure to politics and unionism.
WingNut60 is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.