Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > PPRuNe Social > Jet Blast
Reload this Page >

The Death of DIY??

Jet Blast Topics that don't fit the other forums. Rules of Engagement apply.

The Death of DIY??

Old 3rd Dec 2018, 19:31
  #21 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2009
Location: Australia
Posts: 434
Originally Posted by UpaCreak View Post
Maybe DIY is not everyones bag. No1 Son in law (35) is computer genius, software writer, and amazing chef, but doesn't know which way to hold a screwdriver. I can manage to just about cook scrambled eggs, and work a laptop, but I have built several scale model live steam locomotives.
My SIL is the same in just about every detail. Daughter is the same, except that she can DIY pretty well. Just as well someone in the house can.
Hydromet is online now  
Old 3rd Dec 2018, 20:56
  #22 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Southampton
Posts: 658
If something needs doing, my kids will call me. I tell them it’s easy, but they won’t have it and having seen one of them attempt to do some painting, well it’s better that I start the job rather than correct their efforts...
Saintsman is offline  
Old 3rd Dec 2018, 21:28
  #23 (permalink)  

Controversial, moi?
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 1,539
Before becoming a pilot I was in the building trade. I could write a book on some of the disastrous, and often dangerous, things I have seen done by DIYers. I have no problem if someone wants to carry out DIY but at least recognise what talents, or lack of, are present and seek advice from someone who knows what they are talking about.

Things have never been helped when there used to be a series of publications called 'W****s Good Idea Book No.xx'....How to rewire your house or some other ludicrously simplified explanation of how to carry out a major job. At least the more dangerous areas of DIY wiring have been outlawed.

Coupled with the often appalling levels of DIY workmanship the big stores sell an extraordinary amount of cheap and nasty materials. Recipe for disaster.
M.Mouse is offline  
Old 3rd Dec 2018, 21:31
  #24 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Search me - I only just got out of bed ....
Age: 74
Posts: 445
I've always been inclined to DIY if at all possible. I had to out on the farm. This extended to items of farm machinery, several trailers, plumbing and electrical, a couple of significant towers for amateur radio work and the aluminium to decorate them. I'm a bit more selective these days because of aging bones. Mind you, I'll only go so far. My cooking ability pretty finishes at making toast.

One of my SIL will have a go at anything; the other has never demonstrated the the inclination or the ability.

Australia's biggest hardware chain (Bunnings) still seems very crowded every time I visit. People must still be doing stuff somewhere. Ditto for Ikea. Perhaps not all is lost just yet.
FullOppositeRudder is offline  
Old 3rd Dec 2018, 21:36
  #25 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Australia
Posts: 147
DIY in Australia is booming. The hugely successful (in Oz at least) hardware conglomerate "Bunnings" is full of people every weekend. I am going there soon to get the materials for a new floating floor to be installed (by me of course) in my new shed. All the tools I need will be there and there is a huge range of flooring styles available.

The shed also needs a rainwater tank and associated roof plumbing - also available at Bunnings. And I just finished painting it inside and staining it outside, guess where I went to get the materials?

I am far from alone.
Bull at a Gate is offline  
Old 3rd Dec 2018, 21:47
  #26 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Balikpapan, INDONESIA
Age: 66
Posts: 450
In my opinion it all goes back to "how or where would they ever start to develop any manual dexterity or the nous for DIY.

My generation could all fix a puncture in a bike tyre by the time we were 10 YO.
And our exposure to things mechanical (and electrical) progressed from there.
I caried out my first car engine change before I was 15.

Now, it's Leggo blocks until they're 15. And gaming on the z-Pad.
Not the same!
WingNut60 is online now  
Old 3rd Dec 2018, 21:57
  #27 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 401
I always take my tool box when visiting my daughters properties. Plenty of jobs, lamps to change, self build furniture to construct, batteries to change in toys, advise on what can be built, plumb,wire at suitable price/location
there men fix my phones / laptops buy the drinks etc in exchange





Trinity 09L is offline  
Old 3rd Dec 2018, 21:57
  #28 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Balikpapan, INDONESIA
Age: 66
Posts: 450
Originally Posted by Bull at a Gate and also FullOpposte View Post
DIY in Australia is booming. .....
I am far from alone.
You are quite correct.
But I think that is a different category of DIY from that of the original post.
More like kit assembly, or most of it is.
Not a lot of technical skill or manual dexterity required.
WingNut60 is online now  
Old 3rd Dec 2018, 22:06
  #29 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: UK
Posts: 74
I agree ( 3 kids in their 20's who have successfully ignored months of DIY projects going on around them)

Labour rates in recent years made getting a tradesman in cheaper than buying the tools each time they checked, plus woodwork and metalwork no longer seen as exciting at school so there's also fear of messing it up.

Older generation have the tools and the skill and the experience -> confidence. OK it took a week to paint the room but it's lovely
Younger generation do consider DIY but not in the way we did 30 -40 years ago. A week of evenings is incredibly boringly "long" and DIY has no bragging power :-)
Jetstream67 is offline  
Old 3rd Dec 2018, 22:11
  #30 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: Out in the sticks in DE56
Age: 80
Posts: 540
If it's fun - i.e. mechanical / simple electronic / small cosmetic / 'make me a gadget to...' then I'm up for it. And usually a trawl on line will find any component I need.
If it needs lots of energy / ladderwork / getting filthy or exhausted then at my time of life it's 'get a man in'.
But there's a workshop down at the bottom of the garden with lots of stuff in I couldn't afford earlier in life - so why not use it?
jimtherev is offline  
Old 3rd Dec 2018, 22:12
  #31 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2009
Location: UK
Posts: 74
Originally Posted by Bull at a Gate View Post
DIY in Australia is booming. The hugely successful (in Oz at least) hardware conglomerate "Bunnings" is full of people every weekend. I am going there soon to get the materials for a new floating floor to be installed (by me of course) in my new shed. All the tools I need will be there and there is a huge range of flooring styles available.

The shed also needs a rainwater tank and associated roof plumbing - also available at Bunnings. And I just finished painting it inside and staining it outside, guess where I went to get the materials?

I am far from alone.

FYI Bunnings UK retail DIY venture just went spectacularly bust as they totally failed to recognise that DIY is no longer sexy over here in the UK for the under 40's

The over 40's and UK tradespeople bought what they knew they needed from trade outlets that were cheaper and happy to sell to anyone who knew what they needed and why.
Jetstream67 is offline  
Old 3rd Dec 2018, 22:13
  #32 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Cambridge, England, EU
Posts: 3,398
Originally Posted by Jetstream67 View Post
Labour rates in recent years made getting a tradesman in cheaper than buying the tools each time they checked
That's usually the case. But not quite always - I just bought a 7.50 tool in order to repair something that would have cost 45 to replace, so you can win occasionally.
Originally Posted by Jetstream67 View Post
plus woodwork and metalwork no longer seen as exciting at school so there's also fear of messing it up.
Neither was on offer at my school. My grandfather was, on the other hand, a woodworking teacher (after being a cabinet maker). He did occasionally have a go at showing me how to do things, but it was blindingly obvious that it would take years of full time work to get as good as him (I've got some of his stuff) so I never tried.
Gertrude the Wombat is offline  
Old 3rd Dec 2018, 22:20
  #33 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: A better place.
Posts: 1,509
Thing that struck me about DIY while living in London was that there was f*ck all room or space to do me hammering, sawing and store me tools.
Density of population - no man shed etc.
Noise, dust, major pain in the arse.
B&Q was good in terms of range of stuff needed - prices were very reasonable - most of my power tools are British.
But here in the great Southern Land - plenty of space to make noise, mess and fix or build things!
Saturday is not complete without a trip to the man Supermarket.
Son and mates recently completed science project building an electric motor - 6 lads out in the garage using all Dad's power tools and making a huge mess.
No fingers/limbs were lost and they all got full marks.
So I'm not too sure about the under 40s bit.
tartare is offline  
Old 3rd Dec 2018, 22:49
  #34 (permalink)  
Psychophysiological entity
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Tweet Rob_Benham Famous author. Well, slightly famous.
Age: 79
Posts: 4,632
This self-congratulatory ramble does have a punch line - and a moral to the story.

I've done most everything since I was one year old. I managed to plunge Colchester library into darkness during the war and flooded the hospital waiting room (huge, with Parquet flooring) while learning about wiring and cast iron plumbing.

First job, take down old red-brick chimney, extend slate roof, and install the first north facing window where the fireplace used to be. Second, a 10' X 8' book shelves backing onto what was a very 60's open staircase. All solid mahogany, 3/4" that would support Britannica on a shelf with ease. Then a 300 sq ft kitchen with 5th bedroom above. That cost 1800 quid including the planning application. Okay, it was in 1978.

Years later I moved half the roof up and forward using 17' RSJ's to span the lifted area, installed another bathroom under and then rewired the 113 sockets and introduced two consumer units with the new-fangled RCCD's. I then oak panelled my den and a walk-in cupboard. A thousand quid's worth of American oak to get the height, and Chinese oak for the panels. Six weeks of detailed work using a router, but finishing with chisels to give the hand made look to surfaces. There was not a single finger mark on the light oak. The box section around the vertical plumbing in one corner took a week to do. It had to be removable for pipes and ever increasing alarm and data cables. Hiding wires and pipes has been a fetish of mine since sproghood when I drilled holes in my Hercules crossbar to take lighting wires to the dynamo.

Yadda yadda yadda.

DIY in the genes? Could be. The semi-siblings I discovered in 2001 had worked extensively on their homes, and both had zoned the heating to save running costs. My boiler-house contained the controls for the three zones and two hot water circulation systems to give instant hot in the furthest bathroom.

I can still hear the estate agent's voice on the phone. "Mr Rivets, we just want you to stop". DIYing, that is. I was just finishing the grouting to the laundry. Nice it was. Bloody nice. Kitchen had three sinks and the laundry offered the fourth - under a suspended ceiling with spotlights. The sink from there was going into the integral garage as the 5th sink.

I then picked the wrong moment to sell the house and may as well not have done one single job.

But it got worse.

One visit home to the UK, the Rivetess comes back to a summer rent flat and says, 'There's a load of broken oak on the front drive.'

'NO! Can't have done . . . can he?' Yep, he had. Stripped the lot off and for some reason pulled down the brick built and newly tiled side building that was the walk in cupboard, and water softener room, and log drying store, and . . .

He removed the tiles from the 'Half Bathroom' downstairs and blue washed the plaster. The tiles were very expensive (a bloke that had called selling kitchen stuff, who'd done tiling as his main trade, told me the standard was as good as he could have achieved. Secret was, I'd built the loo and it was planned around a tile size and very accurate.)

SO F42^$#^@$# what? Bloody Nora! The tiles, along with all those spares hidden away, had gone.

He's uprooted a lovely weeping birch that was taller than the house, and torn down a garden wall that was capped with home cast . . . erm, caps. I think the fine oak is now just a stump. A big stump. Its boughs were 10" diameter.

Evening after evening I'd realise that I hadn't cleaned the cement mixer, or I hadn't brushed off the mortar from new brickwork. (It has to be done just as it has dried but is not hard. - next morning will NOT do. )

All in all, a waste of a good chunk of my life.

Or was it? The doing of it. It carried on in the US. Something used to drive me to just do jobs. Two days to hang the front door? The Rivetess suggested. Two weeks, more like. And that's exactly what it took to hang a $1000 door I'd paid $90 for. It was dead centre, dead vertical and shut like a Rolls Royce, but the people that bought the house couldn't have given a toss - but it pleased me every time I closed it.
Loose rivets is offline  
Old 3rd Dec 2018, 23:10
  #35 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: Asia
Posts: 414
Being able to change a tap washer used to be a basic measure of DIY competence, now you need to buy a whole new tap.

My son complained about his bicycle being broken, turns out that the chain had come off and it didn't occur to him to try and put it back on.
krismiler is online now  
Old 3rd Dec 2018, 23:34
  #36 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Balikpapan, INDONESIA
Age: 66
Posts: 450
Originally Posted by krismiler View Post
My son complained about his bicycle being broken, turns out that the chain had come off and it didn't occur to him to try and put it back on.
You might want to explain to him one of the more dire consequences of the chain coming off.
And no, I don't mean having to walk home.
WingNut60 is online now  
Old 3rd Dec 2018, 23:35
  #37 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2009
Location: Search me - I only just got out of bed ....
Age: 74
Posts: 445
One of the reasons why DIY would appear to have retained popularity in OZ is that several of the TV gardening programs started to include minor DIY segments - painting / decorating flower pots and the like. This morphed into redesigning a complete garden corner, and then in time sprucing up the back verandah, building a pergola / barbeque / garden shed. Before you could snap a drill bit it went on to renovations to a room / rooms / almost the whole house. All this on an entire TV program if you don't mind. Other networks copied and for a while you were hard pressed to avoid these DIY programs, always with a tradie type bloke taking advice from a by no means unattractive female brandishing a new cordless electric drill or paint roller or wrecking hammer about to take out a partition (or put one in somewhere). I rarely watch TV beyond the news and perhaps Whatshisname in a pink jacket on a train somewhere brandishing an increasingly dilapidated book on how it was a hundred years ago, but this DIY fad seems to diminished in its frenzy, perhaps even died out altogether. Perhaps it's been overtaken to the point of total extinction by a scourge of cooking and food shows - an even bigger waste of spectrum if you ask me.

I did change a couple of tap washers earlier in the week without destroying the entire plumbing network. Quite a neat job I thought.
FullOppositeRudder is offline  
Old 3rd Dec 2018, 23:35
  #38 (permalink)  
TWT
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: troposphere
Posts: 679
My generation could all fix a puncture in a bike tyre by the time we were 10
Yes. But that's because many of us had to or we'd be walking.

I carried a puncture repair kit on my bike and had to use it a few times on my cycling journey of 6 miles to school. Even if mobile phones were around back then it wouldn't have helped me. There was no-one to come and pick me up.

I did walk a few times pushing the bike in the rain when I didn't have a vulcanising kit available.
TWT is offline  
Old 3rd Dec 2018, 23:41
  #39 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Balikpapan, INDONESIA
Age: 66
Posts: 450
Originally Posted by FullOppositeRudder View Post
One of the reasons why DIY would appear to have retained popularity in OZ is that several of the TV gardening programs started to include minor DIY segments - painting / decorating flower pots and the like. This morphed into redesigning a complete garden corner, and then in time sprucing up the back verandah, building a pergola / barbeque / garden shed. Before you could snap a drill bit it went on to renovations to a room / rooms / almost the whole house........
.
Tim (the Toolman) Taylor?
WingNut60 is online now  
Old 4th Dec 2018, 00:23
  #40 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: Poplar Grove, IL, USA
Age: 52
Posts: 831
DIY is alive and well here in the Colonies. I will agree however there are masses of people who don't know which is the pointy end of a screwdriver. I am doing my best to keep it alive by doing small projects with my sons. My older boy and I are building an airplane (a Sonex Waiex 2 seater), and we totally rebuilt my '99 car. He drives it to school every day now. My younger son has built a human hamster wheel and has recently finished his second hovercraft. I have a '98 car in the project queue for his benefit as well.
IFMU is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.