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UK Politics Hamsterwheel MkII

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UK Politics Hamsterwheel MkII

Old 25th Jul 2019, 08:28
  #9161 (permalink)  
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New Cabinet, courtesy of Politico London Playbook:

Sajid Javid, chancellor: Euroskeptic who backed Remain then wished he hadn’t. Promoted from home secretary. Son of a Pakistani-born bus driver, as he may have mentioned. Fought his way up from the toughest streets in England to earn £3-million-a-year at Deutsche Bank. Arch-Thatcherite. So pro-market he once described ticket touts as “classic entrepreneurs.” Stood back while the U.K.’s largest steelworks went bust. Went on holiday while Tory MPs revolted over business rates. Keeps getting promoted anyway. Likeable bloke. Oddly robotic.

Dominic Raab, foreign secretary and de-facto deputy PM: Vote Leave campaigner. Son of a Czech-born Jewish refugee. Quit Theresa May’s Cabinet in protest over the Brexit deal he helped negotiate. In government just long enough to learn that quite a lot of Britain’s trade come through Calais. Loves Brexit anyway. Former Foreign Office lawyer and David Davis protťgť. Not a feminist. Addicted to chicken caesar baguettes from Pret-a-Manger. Also pinches strawberry split ice lollies from his kids. Black belt at karate. Fluent in Portuguese.

Priti Patel, home secretary: Vote Leave campaigner. Daughter of Ugandan-Asian newsagents. Sacked from Theresa May’s Cabinet for holding secret meetings with the Israeli government while “on holiday” in the Golan Heights. Proper right-winger who loves Margaret Thatcher. May or may not want to bring back hanging — but unlikely to get the chance, either way. Former lobbyist who once worked for the tobacco industry, if this Observer story is right.

Michael Gove, chancellor of the duchy of Lancaster: Vote Leave campaigner. Adopted son of an Aberdeen fisherman. Promoted from environment secretary, now tasked with driving no deal through Whitehall. Unfailingly courteous. Not entirely trusted by his new boss, for obvious reasons. Reforming minister; reformed coke-head. Ex-Times journalist married to the Daily Mail’s star columnist. Smartest man in government by a country mile. Once starred in a movie with Christopher Lee.

Ben Wallace, defense secretary: Now the government’s highest-ranking Remainer. Former ski instructor. Promoted from security minister; the main beneficiary of Jeremy Hunt’s refusal to accept a lesser role. Former British Army captain, now in the job he always craved. Long-standing friend and ally of Boris Johnson, which probably helped. Said last year that a no-deal Brexit would be a serious risk to public safety. Probably now wishes he hadn’t.

Steve Barclay, Brexit secretary: Keeps his job. Brexiteer from the north of England. Tory son of a Labour trade unionist. Trusted by Team Boris to negotiate with fellow silver fox Michel Barnier. Already being briefed against by “EU sources.” Former lawyer and British Army lieutenant.

Andrea Leadsom, business, energy and industrial strategy secretary: Vote Leave campaigner. Ex-Cabinet minister who resigned in protest over the Brexit deal she approved. A mother, as she may have mentioned. Former City banker. As a Treasury minister, was described by one official as “the worst we’ve ever had.” As an energy minister, she once announced: “When I first came to this job one of my two questions was: ‘Is climate change real?’ The other was ‘Is hydraulic fracturing safe?’ And on both of those questions I am now completely persuaded.”

Matt Hancock, health secretary: Tiggerish Remainer. Cricket enthusiast. One of only a handful of Cabinet ministers to keep their job. Ran for leadership to increase his profile, then backed Boris because “he’s going to win and needs good people around him.” Spent the last month performing verbal gymnastics on TV and radio explaining why he disagreed with everything he’d previously said. Was convinced all this would lead to a big promotion. Instead he gets to keep the same job. First task is to start burying all his old policies that his new boss won’t like.

Gavin Williamson, education secretary: Machiavellian ex-fireplace salesman. Former Remainer who now loves Brexit. Former Mayite who now loves Boris. Former defense secretary who now loves schools. Former chief whip who still loves chief whipping. Sacked from the Cabinet less than three months ago for allegedly leaking state secrets. Still denies it was him. Has a pet tarantula which was banned from the ministry of defense. Expected to now bring Cronus back to Whitehall. Mark Sedwill may not be impressed. State-educated.

Amber Rudd, work and pensions secretary: Also now handed the women and equalities brief. Avid lifelong Remainer, until about 10 days ago. Managed to keep her job despite backing Jeremy Hunt. Big brother runs the People’s Vote campaign, which should make family gatherings fun this autumn. Theater buff. Recently enjoyed Henry VI at the Globe because “it’s about a king who takes over from another king, and then has the same problems.” Appeared in “Four Weddings and a Funeral.”

Robert Jenrick, housing, communities and local government secretary: Big promotion from Treasury minister for a young Remainer. Pleased Team Boris with a joint op-ed backing Johnson early in the campaign. Former lawyer. Famous for owning several expensive houses — will now be in charge of building many more. Pick of the bunch is this lovely Grade I-listed pilein Herefordshire. First Cabinet minister ever to be born in the 1980s.

Liz Truss, international trade secretary: Reformed Remainer who now loves Brexit. Reformed Lib Dem who now loves free markets. Yorkshire lass. Has not landed the big job she was hoping for after abandoning her leadership hopes. That viral party conference speech about opening pork markets in Beijing must have left an impression on the new PM. New opportunities to travel should be good for her Instagram, at any rate. Will hopefully keep on winding up colleagues with mischievous speeches.

Grant Shapps, transport secretary: Former Remainer now reconciled to Brexit. Disciple of LBJ, via Robert Caro. Team Boris spreadsheet king. So confident in his own abilities he handed Johnson a sealed envelope with voting numbers in it before the result was announced. Man of many names. Flies his own plane; now has his own train set too. The only Cabinet minister guaranteed to do a better job than his predecessor.

Theresa Villiers, environment secretary: Vote Leave campaigner. Sacked from Theresa May’s Cabinet when she became PM in 2016. Former lawyer and MEP. Big on animal welfare and wants more U.K. farming to be free range. Wrote in 2017 that “we should not be afraid to ask those countries who wish to sell into our market to commit to acceptable standards of animal welfare.” So probably not a fan of chlorinated chicken. Descended from royalty. Makes her dispatch box debut in a couple of hours.

Robert Buckland, lord chancellor and justice secretary: Another big promotion for a Remainer who penned the joint pro-Boris op-ed with Jenrick and Rishi Sunak. Cabinet’s highest-ranking Welshman. Jovial chap. Former solicitor-general and prisons minister, so unusually well qualified for the job. First lord chancellor in living memory who has actually sat as a trial judge. You can almost hear the legal world breathing a sigh of relief.

Nicky Morgan, digital, culture, media and sport secretary: Another arch-Remainer in a lower-ranked job. Sacked from Theresa May’s Cabinet when she became PM in 2016. Has been chairing the Commons Treasury committee since the last election. Hates expensive trousers. Loves expensive handbags. Irritated pro-Remain colleagues by signing up to the so-called Malthouse Compromise plan. Probably got her a job in the Cabinet, though.

Alok Sharma, international development secretary: Low-key Remainer now backing Brexit. Promoted from employment minister. Indian-born; Berkshire-bred. Worked with Boris at the Foreign Office; friends ever since. Played the part of Jeremy Hunt in Team Boris’ preparations for the leadership debates. Former accountant. Not the most exciting of politicians thus far.

Julian Smith, Northern Ireland secretary: Surprise inclusion for Theresa May’s chief whip who was expected to depart with the PM. Has spent months working closely with the DUP so understands the issues there well. Close ally of Gavin Williamson, which probably also helped.

Alister Jack, Scottish secretary: Farmer, businessman and hardline Brexiteer. Also grows Christmas trees for a living. First member of the 2017 intake to make the Cabinet. Already fully signed-up to a no-deal Brexit. Scottish Tory leader Ruth Davidson will not be impressed. SNP leader Nicola Sturgeon will be rubbing her hands with glee.

Alun Cairns, Welsh secretary: Remainer now reconciled to a sharp break with Europe. Champion marathon runner. Last remaining Cabinet minister appointed to their job by David Cameron.

Natalie Evans, leader of the House of Lords: Former think tank boss. Husband James Wild was just appointed deputy chief of staff in No. 10.

James Cleverly, minister without portfolio and Tory party chairman: Brexiteer. Promoted from deputy chairman; now tasked with getting the party machine ready for the inevitable general election. Another former British Army lieutenant. Worked with Johnson as youth ambassador at City Hall.

Also attending Cabinet: Though not full members … Chief Whip Mark Spencer … Chief Secretary to the Treasury Rishi Sunak … Attorney General Geoffrey Cox … Leader of the Commons Jacob Rees-Mogg … Housing Minister Esther McVey … Skills Minister Jo Johnson… Security Minister Brandon Lewis … Cabinet Office Minister Oliver Dowden … Energy Minister Kwasi Kwarteng.


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Old 25th Jul 2019, 08:35
  #9162 (permalink)  
 
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What is the position on young people voting for a political party in the UK?

At what age is a young person eligible to vote. Is it 18 years old. 16 years old. Or 15 years old?

If children aged 15 were eligible to vote for Boris Johnson because their parents stumped up the Tory Party 'Junior Membership' fee, why was that principle not extended to the 16 year old age group at the 2017 general election?

What if the latest Tory leadership contest had resulted in a 51 % / 49% split in favour of Hunt? Would the ERG have respected that result and honoured the will of the people ... or demanded a recount.
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Old 25th Jul 2019, 09:41
  #9163 (permalink)  
 
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I will unite the country says Boris-well to quote from The Right Stuff when Gordo Cooper asks how he can become a star on the local bars wall he gets the answer-you gotta die son . And thats the onkly way Boris might unite us in our Untied Ha ha Kingdom.

A gang of ultra right devious career minded goons for a cabinet isnt going to unite anything , the last time we were in this state was WW2 where Churchill took command of a country untied already united as we were in a shooting war and did a brilliant job for a couple of years. he also was supported a by a man of different views who he left to run the country. While Churchill;'ran' the war Clement Atlee ran the country and both en respected teach other and put their differences aside for the country. He also had the US Military and the Red army come to his aid by 1942 which obviously helped. This time the UK PM is likely to get more help from Vlad than America First Trump, who suppoeted us over Iran-oh that wasnt the US but France and Germany and now we have a PM who thinks he can renege on legitimate commitments made when UK was amemeber. Bit like agreeing with your neighbour to repave a common driveway and when its done say actually I am moving and wont pay my half. that will do the pound a greatd eal of good.

Not being invaded by Gemany is not the same as wrecking our economy and the hopes of our children to protect the cowboy end of the City of London's money laundering and tax evasion industry (the more legitimate end of the City is all foreign owned now anyway). As the Eu have decided that they will now go after the lawyers and advisors of thee crooked but quasi legal activities there are obviously powerful reasons for some traditional conservative voters to try and escape justice-might be hard though as the EU proposals are retrospective.

Mind you Boris has done some people a favour, most of my friends and acquaintances in the US now claim that he is even worse an embarrassment and disaster than Trump who at least sort of got elected. Boris was elected by .01666 pct of the population, ie two thirds of the members of a party that doesn't even have a majority-democracy British style or as its become now government by celebrity
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Old 25th Jul 2019, 09:44
  #9164 (permalink)  
 
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"What if the latest Tory leadership contest had resulted in a 51 % / 49% split in favour of Hunt? Would the ERG have respected that result and honoured the will of the people ... or demanded a recount". Posted by sfm818. I'm sure all parlimentarians would respect the result and honour the will of the people. It's the remainers who have difficulty doing that! The country will have to accept being less well off, just as if Jeremy Corbin wins the next election.
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Old 25th Jul 2019, 10:11
  #9165 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by yotty View Post
It's the remainers who have difficulty doing that! The country will have to accept being less well off ...
The country is already less well off. The pound devalued before Cameron had time to resign and May delivered significant price increases on foods and medicines ... before abandoning her attempt to negotiate a deal that will not further harm the economy.

Remainers have no difficulty understanding the risks presented by the rise of populism, or the method by which the ERG engineered the election of a new Prime Minister based on a personality cult, instead of hard, economic reality.


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Old 25th Jul 2019, 10:26
  #9166 (permalink)  
 
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Good for you sfm and the fact remains that the 'result' was years ago -into its fourth year after the referendum. We also have a collapsing car industry-the last of british Steel , god knows how many retailers in dire trouble and one of biggest inward investors-Japan saying a no deal Brexit means a Japexit from the UK . And as for our American 'friends' have you tasted Cadburys chocolate since they took over-shopped in Boots since they took over and thats before we let them sell their carcinogenic , GM , hormone infested foodstuff here at prices that kill the UK farming industry who are just waking up to that fact and realising there is no CAP for them anymore just worthless promises from
a clown with no money to do anything.
To say that the referendum vote should be respected is absurd its like saying labour won the last really clear General election and thus should remain in power until there is a tory majority of the same magnitude.
We all know it was a fix trading on the ignorance and stupidity of the average Sun and mail reader who just read the front page and then turn to celebs and sport .
Ok thats harsh and unkind but at least us stayers dont go in for death threats and vandalism and we put up with far far far more abuse than ever gets dished out by those who feel its ok to renege on debts and tell lies to deceive the vulnerable .
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Old 25th Jul 2019, 10:32
  #9167 (permalink)  
 
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pax britanica writes:
[color=left=#000000]Ok thats harsh and unkind but at least us stayers dont go in for death threats and vandalism and we put up with far far far more abuse than ever gets dished out by those who feel its ok to renege on debts and tell lies to deceive the vulnerable" .

Are you quite sure? Really?[/color]

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Old 25th Jul 2019, 11:08
  #9168 (permalink)  
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Great post # 9174 ORAC....sums them up nicely.

However, what is disturbing is the number of former military ........if ever the minimal level of competency could be lowered, their background will ensure this happens.
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Old 25th Jul 2019, 11:23
  #9169 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Krystal n chips View Post
Great post # 9174 ORAC....sums them up nicely.

However, what is disturbing is the number of former military ........if ever the minimal level of competency could be lowered, their background will ensure this happens.
Yes we know you had a bad experience in/with the forces, but your continued carping about it doesn't show you in a good light. Likewise your frequent sarcasm directed at VP959 gets very wearing.

You occasionally make a good and even relevant political point, so why don't you stick to doing what actually works and you might actually be respected for?
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Old 25th Jul 2019, 11:23
  #9170 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by sfm818 View Post
What is the position on young people voting for a political party in the UK?

At what age is a young person eligible to vote. Is it 18 years old. 16 years old. Or 15 years old?

If children aged 15 were eligible to vote for Boris Johnson because their parents stumped up the Tory Party 'Junior Membership' fee, why was that principle not extended to the 16 year old age group at the 2017 general election?

.
Difficult question that, personally I would say from the day they start paying NI and Tax, as it is their monies that are now being spent by the UK PLC, so they should have a say in how it is spent.

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Old 25th Jul 2019, 11:24
  #9171 (permalink)  
 
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A poor performance at the despatch box by Boris. The only thing that saved him was that grandad was worse.
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Old 25th Jul 2019, 11:47
  #9172 (permalink)  
 
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A quote from a speech a month or so ago. But worth reproducing here as we are going to find out where Boris really is at sooner or later

With a “new deal” impossible by October 31 - and all know full well it is, whatever they profess to believe - we shall seemingly either have a Prime Minister fully aware that “no deal” can be the only outcome on that date, hoping that the 27 deliver it for him, and genuinely not intending to seek an extension.
Or we have a PM who fully intends to seek an extension, calculating – wrongly, I fear - that, unlike his predecessor, he can deliver a Withdrawal Agreement with alternative arrangements to a backstop embedded in it, or guaranteed to come into force before it was ever triggered.
Or we have a PM who privately knows that the Withdrawal Agreement will not be reopened, but thinks he can sell it unchanged, accompanied by a changed destination in the Political Declaration, with some brio, charisma and bluster, to a Commons some of whom are desperate now to get anything over the line.
Or we have a PM who intends to make what he knows to be unnegotiable demands in order to have the pretext to go for an election which enables him, once the demands are rebuffed, to go to “no deal” if he can change the composition of the Commons to back it.
If it is the last, once you go to “no deal”, everything I have outlined earlier applies and we discover, painfully, that it is not sustainable and that the only route to a loose preferential trade deal lies by agreeing precisely what we are rejecting now. But with a lot more money.
As we now, for the second time in 3 years, see a new Prime Minister elected by a small group who think it falls to them to determine what the “will of the people” is - a peculiar view of liberal democracy in my view - perhaps we can dispense with the fantasies and falsehoods, and learn which of these 4 propositions we are facing this autumn.
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Old 25th Jul 2019, 13:07
  #9173 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Effluent Man View Post
A poor performance at the despatch box by Boris. The only thing that saved him was that grandad was worse.
I haven't seen it so can't comment, but lets face it. If you want a sober and statesmanlike demeanour or a polished performance at the despatch box then Boris was never your man. That's simply not his strength. Perhaps the question should be whether his performance enthused his own MPs and party members?
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Old 25th Jul 2019, 13:30
  #9174 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Andy_S View Post
I haven't seen it so can't comment, but lets face it. If you want a sober and statesmanlike demeanour or a polished performance at the despatch box then Boris was never your man. That's simply not his strength. Perhaps the question should be whether his performance enthused his own MPs and party members?
I saw part of it.
This Tweet from James Cleverly summed it up.

Iím not allowed to take photos in the chamber, but here is an artistís impression of the Labour benches.

🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁🙁😯😶😯😡😡 😕☹️


And as to your final point, they lapped it up.
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Old 25th Jul 2019, 13:34
  #9175 (permalink)  
 
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Despite being at the top of the political tree, I’ve always thought of the PM’s role as being more of a facilitator for others to enact or follow through on government policy once it has been settled on by the cabinet under the PM’s guidance. In this respect I think he is suited for the role, but that does not mean he will be ultimately successful in it, and of course, only time will tell.

He certainly appears to know how to work a room and energise people, I think the next two weeks will be critical. Varadker must surely be feeling nervous?
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Old 25th Jul 2019, 13:35
  #9176 (permalink)  
 
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I thought bercows dressing down of old mac Donald was too little, too late. Awful throwback that he is.
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Old 25th Jul 2019, 14:09
  #9177 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by yellowtriumph View Post
Despite being at the top of the political tree, Iíve always thought of the PMís role as being more of a facilitator for others to enact or follow through on government policy once it has been settled on by the cabinet under the PMís guidance. In this respect I think he is suited for the role, but that does not mean he will be ultimately successful in it, and of course, only time will tell.

He certainly appears to know how to work a room and energise people, I think the next two weeks will be critical. Varadker must surely be feeling nervous?
Having heard a bit of his Commons speech, I got the impression that he was going to withhold the £39bn we owe in the event of no deal. That's hardly going to facilitate any policies involving Europe, or any country that likes sovereign debts to be paid.

As for Varadkar, why should he be nervous? He has the full support of the EU and has already been promised billions of aid if needed.
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Old 25th Jul 2019, 14:20
  #9178 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by pax britanica View Post
A gang of ultra right devious career minded goons for a cabinet isnt going to unite anything .
But they aren't even slightly right wing. No matter how many times you say it. They believe in big government, a welfare state, redistribution of income and the NHS.
This makes them socialists.
.


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Old 25th Jul 2019, 14:21
  #9179 (permalink)  
 
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As for Varadkar, why should he be nervous? He has the full support of the EU and has already been promised billions of aid if needed.
And, as an outsider looking in, he and his deputy, Coveney, appear a darn sight more competent that our bunch of extremist lunatics - at least the ones that Prime Minister Buffoon has put in place.
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Old 25th Jul 2019, 14:23
  #9180 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Sallyann1234 View Post
Having heard a bit of his Commons speech, I got the impression that he was going to withhold the £39bn we owe in the event of no deal. That's hardly going to facilitate any policies involving Europe, or any country that likes sovereign debts to be paid.
The £39bn is not sovereign debts.
It is reparations. Punishment for leaving the EU.
To frighten all the other countries who should leave the EU into remaining in this evil undemocratic superstate.
.


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