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UK Politics Hamsterwheel MkII

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UK Politics Hamsterwheel MkII

Old 8th Mar 2019, 16:42
  #5881 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Parapunter View Post
Mostly thanks to the useful idiots sold a pack of lies & manipulated by Russian money & troll farms in a massively flawed democratic exercise leading directly to a serious player in Europe becoming separated from the institutions shaping it's future. So yes, I just bet Vlad is pissing himself laughing.
PP, with respect, the fact you still spout this garbage says more about your own shortcomings than those you believe were manipulated in the way you describe. Remain LOST, and we are LEAVING. Time to face facts and get with the game....
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Old 8th Mar 2019, 16:49
  #5882 (permalink)  
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The perfect caption comp !......."how many trade deals have you secured Treeza ? "

https://www.theguardian.com/politics...er-brexit-deal
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Old 8th Mar 2019, 16:59
  #5883 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Exrigger View Post
The way I see it the current options are:

2. Donít accept the bad deal, default exit under WTO rules on the March 29th as per Article 50, sort out deals within the two-year transition period.
4. If deal re-negotiated and still Westminster reject deal, default exit under WTO rules at end of extension period & use any transition period to sort out deals.
Any one care to opine/guess what the likely outcome will be, or add any other options that I may have missed.
in both these scenarios there will be no transition period.
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Old 8th Mar 2019, 17:01
  #5884 (permalink)  
 
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This could catch on, we could replace our Parliament with Turkey's, duck's and chicken..

https://www.msn.com/en-gb/news/offbe...oat/ar-BBUwnv9
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Old 8th Mar 2019, 17:03
  #5885 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by back to Boeing View Post
in both these scenarios there will be no transition period.
Thanks for that, for some reason I had missed that difference :

https://fullfact.org/europe/will-the...leave-no-deal/
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Old 8th Mar 2019, 17:18
  #5886 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Sallyann1234 View Post
This thread is going down the same plughole as the previous ones. Will it last until 29th March?
like the discussion we will never know but, I would say no , or maybe yes, but then Iím not sure.
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Old 8th Mar 2019, 17:28
  #5887 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Exrigger View Post
Thanks for that, for some reason I had missed that difference :

https://fullfact.org/europe/will-the...leave-no-deal/
Bearing in mind that it has not been possible to reach a satisfactory exit deal within the allotted time (as firmly predicted two years ago), I am wondering what are the chances of reaching a satisfactory trade deal with the two year period - assuming of course that there is such a period.

Which of our esteemed negotiators, fresh from their exit deal up, will be representing the UK?

How will this negotiation be reconciled with a parallel negotiation with the US, whose requirements are likely to conflict considerably with those of the EU?

March 30th will only be the start of the next painful stage, so it's good that the country is in such capable hands.
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Old 8th Mar 2019, 17:48
  #5888 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by andrewn View Post
PP, with respect, the fact you still spout this garbage says more about your own shortcomings than those you believe were manipulated in the way you describe. Remain LOST, and we are LEAVING. Time to face facts and get with the game....
What respect? And what garbage? If I'm wrong, let's see the evidence.
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Old 8th Mar 2019, 17:51
  #5889 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Exrigger View Post
2. Donít accept the bad deal, default exit under WTO rules on the March 29th as per Article 50, sort out deals within the two-year transition period.
It is utterly mind-boggling that people are still saying things like that. But then there are people who think "no deal" means we don't leave.

Hint: the transition period is part of the deal. If there is no deal there is no transition period.
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Old 8th Mar 2019, 18:08
  #5890 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Gertrude the Wombat View Post
It is utterly mind-boggling that people are still saying things like that. But then there are people who think "no deal" means we don't leave.

Hint: the transition period is part of the deal. If there is no deal there is no transition period.
That has already been pointed out, and acknowledged, but thanks again , as to the first comment, I merely put down the options as I see them and asked what people might consider to be likely and if they can offer any other opinions on any options I may have missed.

As a matter of interest, are you saying that a default exit is not one of the options that is still possible, would be interested in why, especially as that is currently the Article 50 legal position if no deal is agreed, or have I missed a change to that position?
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Old 8th Mar 2019, 18:09
  #5891 (permalink)  
 
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And if there is no deal, we will be negotiating everything. Goods, services, transport, access to Europe, energy, medicine, you name it. The cavalier arrogance of leavers is profoundly depressing.
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Old 8th Mar 2019, 18:17
  #5892 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Parapunter View Post
And if there is no deal, we will be negotiating everything. Goods, services, transport, access to Europe, energy, medicine, you name it. The cavalier arrogance of leavers is profoundly depressing.
Yes, you got that one correct, donít get too depressed please.
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Old 8th Mar 2019, 18:17
  #5893 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Sallyann1234 View Post
Bearing in mind that it has not been possible to reach a satisfactory exit deal within the allotted time (as firmly predicted two years ago), I am wondering what are the chances of reaching a satisfactory trade deal with the two year period - assuming of course that there is such a period.

Which of our esteemed negotiators, fresh from their exit deal up, will be representing the UK?

How will this negotiation be reconciled with a parallel negotiation with the US, whose requirements are likely to conflict considerably with those of the EU?

March 30th will only be the start of the next painful stage, so it's good that the country is in such capable hands.

Chances are less than zero....

That's exactly why PM May's whole Exit strategy has gone in this direction - keep the UK in the EU ( however tenuously ) because that is the main objective of the majority of Politicos in the UK and those in the EU member countries plus, of course, the Brussels Mafia.

At the end of the day, she has never been a Leaver ( for whatever reason ) and most certainly won't allow 29th March to come and go without some sort of arrangement which keeps the UK attached to the EU. The fact that the EU agreed to her proposal is proof enough that it is not in the UK's best interests if the the UK is really, really, really going to kiss goodbye / stick a finger up ( take your pick ) to the EU.

And with PM May's 'deal' leaving the UK still attached to the EU and no time limit on the length of time the EU might ' need ' for dotting the 'i's and crossing the 't's for any agreements to be negotiated after March 29th, this situation finally and now unalterably has all the look of those other referenda - France, Ireland, Holland - when the EU supporting politicos and apologists lost the referendum but eventually overturned or simply ignored the result.

I've taken the champagne out of the fridge and put it back in the cellar.







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Old 8th Mar 2019, 18:18
  #5894 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Exrigger View Post
As a matter of interest, are you saying that a default exit is not one of the options that is still possible, would be interested in why, especially as that is currently the Article 50 legal position if no deal is agreed, or have I missed a change to that position?
A "default" exit is by definition still possible, as it is whatever the default would be if nothing else was agreed, this is simply what "default" means.

In this case the default is a no-deal crash out, and it is still possible, and to me it seems rather more likely than May's "deal" (which isn't actually a deal, as the importing stuff isn't in the withdrawal agreement but in the political declaration, and that has no legal force, so rather than a "deal" one might better describe it as a "blind #brexit").

But it doesn't have a transition period. So we wouldn't be limited to having to clear up the mess in two years, which is just as well as it would be rather a big ask - we'd have decades to work at it.
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Old 8th Mar 2019, 18:21
  #5895 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Hussar 54 View Post
I've taken the champagne out of the fridge and put it back in the cellar.
Ours is staying in the cellar until we've heard from at least two reputable sources (which sadly doesn't include the BBC these days) that A50 has been revoked.

So that'll give us a choice between drinking warm champagne or waiting a couple of hours before we join in the street parties.

I suppose we could do both - drink warm champagne immediately and cold champagne later.
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Old 8th Mar 2019, 18:42
  #5896 (permalink)  
 
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There is a difference to what peoples aspirations/wants/needs are in this matter and what I put forward for debate, We know how fervently people believe in what they want to happen and what they think of those who have a different opinion. I was merely looking at what option could be the most likely out of a list I made up from across various media outlets, or any other combination/option I may have missed that would be feasible, but instead all one gets is more verbose opinions on how much some people don't want an exit at all, along with the odd insult thrown in for good measure.
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Old 8th Mar 2019, 19:15
  #5897 (permalink)  
 
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To paraphrase the great man, the government are in the stickiest situation since Sticky the Stick Insect got stuck on a sticky bun, not sure how they are
going to extract themselves from this one. Every option seems to piss off plenty of people...

My contention, however, as absurd as it seems, is that the government are trying to deliberately engineer a hard Brexit surreptitiously, it fits perfectly into a future Tory ideology far more closely than any other option.
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Old 8th Mar 2019, 19:22
  #5898 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Hussar 54 View Post
....

I've taken the champagne out of the fridge and put it back in the cellar.
Champagne?? Pahh!!

There's much nicer English grown 'bubbly'!!
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Old 8th Mar 2019, 20:02
  #5899 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by NoelEvans View Post
There's much nicer English grown 'bubbly'!!
There's some tolerable Oz stuff, but I've never come across anything English - specifically what do you recommend?
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Old 8th Mar 2019, 20:12
  #5900 (permalink)  
 
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Just so you know I am having to do a real days work plumbing instead of drinking tea and being bored on turn around's. Hence no responses to project fear PPRuNe. As far as I can tell cock all changed and 29th zero extra fuel required or loaded.
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