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Journalistic standards

Old 29th Sep 2018, 16:26
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Journalistic standards

From USA Today

Fossils of a new, giant species of dinosaur have been discovered in South Africa, a study published Thursday reports.The creature, which lived some 200 million years ago, was about twice the size of a modern-day African elephant. It was also the largest land animal alive on the planet at that time, according to the study.
Known by the Latin name Ledumahadi mafube, it weighed over 26,000 pounds and stood about 13 feet high at the hips.
Now I did not take Latin at school. French and German yes, Latin no.

But I'd be prepared to bet that Ledumahadi mafube is not Latin.
It may be its scientific classification, but it's not its Latin Name.
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 16:33
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Apparently Ledumahadi Mafube means "a giant thunderclap at dawn" in the Sesutho language - at least that's according to another journalist (Independent)
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 17:05
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Apparently Ledumahadi Mafube means "a giant thunderclap at dawn" in the Sesutho language - at least that's according to another journalist (Independent)
........Q E D
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 17:17
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A giant thunderclap at dawn is how I like to begin my day.
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 22:54
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USA Today and Journalistic standards in same post........................... there is a first, didn't relalise they knew of each others existence.
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 23:48
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Recently, "journalistic standards" is an oxymoron.
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Old 30th Sep 2018, 00:40
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" in the Sesutho language -" The correct spelling is actually "Sesotho"
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Old 30th Sep 2018, 01:53
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At least they got the first letter correct! It should be Linnaean name.
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Old 30th Sep 2018, 11:09
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in the Sesutho language -" The correct spelling is actually "Sesotho"
There are many examples of words like this which are transliterations into English where the spelling changes over time. Thus the Koran appears to be called the Quran, or even the Qu'ran now (what's that apostrophe all about?), Mao Tse Tung became Mao Ze Dong, Calcutta is now Kolkata etc. In all cases the original words haven't changed, just some academic somewhere has decided that their way of transliterating is better.

On the other hand I notice that my local Chinese hasn't yet started doing Beijing duck!
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Old 30th Sep 2018, 11:48
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just some academic somewhere has decided that their way of transliterating is better.
I believe that's called "progess". It's why most of us (Daily Mail readers excluded, of course) are no longer neanderthals.
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Old 30th Sep 2018, 12:21
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Most nineteenth century (or earlier) attempts at transliteration fell very wide of the mark.
Most current systems of transliteration are just as bad or worse.

Try transliterating กรุงเทพมหานคร
You could try saying Krung Thep Maha Nakhon, but you would still not be understood by a native Thai speaker.

Thank god the Thais are still happy calling it Bangkok.
And thank him again that they don't want you to use the full name:- Krung Thep Mahanakhon Amon Rattanakosin Mahinthara Ayuthaya Mahadilok Phop Noppharat Ratchathani Burirom Udomratchaniwet Mahasathan Amon Piman Awatan Sathit Sakkathattiya Witsanukam Prasit
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Old 30th Sep 2018, 13:11
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Originally Posted by Tankertrashnav View Post
Thus the Koran appears to be called the Quran, or even the Qu'ran now (what's that apostrophe all about?)
It's actually the Qur'an, not the Qu'ran. The apostrophe signifies, in this case, a glottal stop which practically guarantees that no native English speaker will be able to pronounce it correctly.
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Old 30th Sep 2018, 22:03
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I find the major news sites often littered with minor spelling and grammatical mistakes, reflecting I suspect an overall fall in the quality of journalism over the last few decades. The quality of the "Red Tops"* in the 90's were better than the broadsheet* rubbish we see today. Standards have not been maintained.

*For the benefit of non-UK readers, red top are aimed at primarily working class/uneducated masses being slightly sensationalist (have red front-page headers, similar to the NY Post in content?) whereas broadsheets (reflecting I believe the original size of the paper) were allegedly for the more refined middle classes and above. Naturally I read the red tops myself....
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Old 30th Sep 2018, 22:12
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Originally Posted by flash8 View Post
I find the major news sites often littered with minor spelling and grammatical mistakes, reflecting I suspect an overall fall in the quality of journalism over the last few decades. Standards have not been maintained.
I agree - I don't know whether it is a decline in basic English or just laziness and allowing autocorrect programmes to alter text without the writer checking that the finished article reflects their intentions.

And not just the major news sites (although they should know better) but also the the local newspaper articles are littered with grammatical errors or just typos - indicating a lack of proof-reading.
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Old 30th Sep 2018, 23:05
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hank god the Thais are still happy calling it Bangkok.
But they don't - they call it Krung Thep when speaking amongst themselves.- or at least mrsr1's family & friends do.
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Old 1st Oct 2018, 01:25
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Originally Posted by reynoldsno1 View Post
But they don't - they call it Krung Thep when speaking amongst themselves.- or at least mrsr1's family & friends do.
Sorry, should have said "Happy with US calling it Bangkok"

Got very confused coming back from Hua Hin once, looking for Bangkok (in Thai) on the road signs.
Could make out the "ng" letter in the middle, but it just didn't look right.

Finally worked out the Krung Thep once back at the hotel.
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Old 1st Oct 2018, 10:10
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Originally Posted by G-CPTN View Post
I agree - I don't know whether it is a decline in basic English or just laziness and allowing autocorrect programmes to alter text without the writer checking that the finished article reflects their intentions.

And not just the major news sites (although they should know better) but also the the local newspaper articles are littered with grammatical errors or just typos - indicating a lack of proof-reading.
I'd suggest that all too often it's simply the rush to be the first to get the news on to the web. Not checking spelling and grammar is only the beginning; facts often appear a little wayward too.
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Old 1st Oct 2018, 10:13
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It's actually the Qur'an, not the Qu'ran. The apostrophe signifies, in this case, a glottal stop which practically guarantees that no native English speaker will be able to pronounce it correctly.




Thanks for the correction about the position of the apostrophe, I rather thought it might be something to do with glottal stops. Half of the UK population seems to use the glottal stop now, which drives me mad, even my Oxford educated daughter tells me she lives in No'ingham

As you imply all of these attempts to reproduce the original pronunciation by transliteration are doomed to failure, as are misguided attempts to imitate foreign words. As an example I will always pronounce "trait" as written, and find that most English speakers' attempts to say "tray" come out as something you carry your drinks on, and nothing like how a Frenchman would say it.

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Old 1st Oct 2018, 12:31
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There are no journalistic standards any more, anything goes including if there is no story, make it up.
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Old 1st Oct 2018, 12:43
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Correct Doctor Druces.

There's no money in it anymore, many experienced journalists have been let go and there's very

few sub-editors and minimal or zero proof reading.

Advertising dollars are increasingly being spent with the likes of Google and Facebook rather than

traditional news outlets.
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