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What Car? Would you not buy?

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What Car? Would you not buy?

Old 27th Sep 2018, 20:11
  #101 (permalink)  

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Keyless entry... My son worked for a car hire company; his boss was a total w****r, always trying to catch out his employees for minor indiscretions - he seemed to like giving out "disciplinaries" as the company called them.

The "boss" delivered a brand new Mondeo to a customer who needed the car in a hurry to drive to Scotland. It had keyless ignition. The customer was waiting and desperate to set off so the engine was left running, he jumped in and roared off up the A1 to his important appointment. Some time after my son's boss got back to the office he realised he still had the key for that car in his pocket....

Made my son's day!
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Old 27th Sep 2018, 20:50
  #102 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by ShyTorque View Post
Keyless entry... My son worked for a car hire company; his boss was a total w****r, always trying to catch out his employees for minor indiscretions - he seemed to like giving out "disciplinaries" as the company called them.

The "boss" delivered a brand new Mondeo to a customer who needed the car in a hurry to drive to Scotland. It had keyless ignition. The customer was waiting and desperate to set off so the engine was left running, he jumped in and roared off up the A1 to his important appointment. Some time after my son's boss got back to the office he realised he still had the key for that car in his pocket....

Made my son's day!
Try that in our car and you get caption warnings "key out of car""and loud bongs.
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Old 28th Sep 2018, 11:38
  #103 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Uplinker
Muscle memory means that left and right feet deliver entirely different pressures even though you think they are the same.
Exactly. Unless you have raced or rallied cars, your left foot is unlikely to have the fine control and feel required to left-foot brake subtlety and effectively.
The other exception being pilots of course. I do a lot of trial lessons and a large percentage of first-timers will have the aircraft pointing at the left edge of the taxiway at their first braking attempt. They feed in a measured amount of braking on the right pedal, but will just hammer down the left one as they're used to.

Apologies for aviation content...
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Old 28th Sep 2018, 16:01
  #104 (permalink)  
 
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Sorry but I am rather old fashioned and would not like to do my travels across France in any car that does not have a full size spare wheel.
Not many new cars come with this item now. (for info have a VW Passat Estate)
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Old 28th Sep 2018, 16:38
  #105 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Mike6567 View Post
Sorry but I am rather old fashioned and would not like to do my travels across France in any car that does not have a full size spare wheel.
Not many new cars come with this item now. (for info have a VW Passat Estate)
Optional on some cars, mine came with an emergency spare (at a cost) threw it out and replaced it with one of the car's winter tyres. Reverse in winter. Bay is large enough for a full size.
And what car would I not buy? Anything Land/Range Rover. Late nineties experience with two Discos still.....grumble, grumble, %$£"& and BWM (Who owned them at the time.)
Per
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Old 28th Sep 2018, 18:06
  #106 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by wowzz View Post
I can see the point of keyless entry. What I cannot fathom is the credit card sized card that Renault use, which you have to slot in, and then press the stop star button. No advantage whatsoever over a key, just bigger to carry around, and you can't combine it with any other keys.
Wowzz, You forgot to mention wedging a chip fork and a bit of cardboard in with the 'credit card' to flex it enough that the fatigued solder joint on the induction coil makes contact with the PCB (once you jiggled it around for a minute or two). Not many Renaults will be used as get away cars though...
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Old 28th Sep 2018, 18:15
  #107 (permalink)  
 
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I had the misfortune to have a ride with one of those ‘left foot brakers’ some years ago. In heavy London traffic, he held a constant throttle opening with his right foot, and moderated speed by repeated jabs at the brake pedal with his left. Knowing what was going on, I could then distinguish them as their brake lights were on all the time: up to then I assumed it was a faulty car, but in fact it was a faulty driver.
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Old 28th Sep 2018, 20:48
  #108 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Mike6567 View Post
Sorry but I am rather old fashioned and would not like to do my travels across France in any car that does not have a full size spare wheel.
Not many new cars come with this item now. (for info have a VW Passat Estate)
This is a pet hate of mine.

The problem is the politicly driven emmission laws.
Improve power to weight ration, and you emit less.
Removing the spare wheel, removes weight!

It should be mandatory to have the spare available as an option, and have somewhere to stow it.
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Old 28th Sep 2018, 21:15
  #109 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Mike6567 View Post
Sorry but I am rather old fashioned and would not like to do my travels across France in any car that does not have a full size spare wheel.
France wouldn't bother me, but discovering that I only had a fake spare wheel in a hire car on Vancouver Island, which was good for something like 50km, when the nearest garage was something like 100km (of gravel roads) away ...
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Old 28th Sep 2018, 21:44
  #110 (permalink)  
 
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Full sized spares are essential when driving in regional areas (hundreds of km to next town). Remote areas even more so - some carry two spares!
'Run-flat' tyres cannot even get you (safely) to the next town.
Four flats in 40+ years - three 'foreign' objects spiking the tyre; one where the valve stem 'melted' !!
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Old 28th Sep 2018, 23:36
  #111 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Mechta View Post
Wowzz, You forgot to mention wedging a chip fork and a bit of cardboard in with the 'credit card' to flex it enough that the fatigued solder joint on the induction coil makes contact with the PCB (once you jiggled it around for a minute or two). Not many Renaults will be used as get away cars though...
Fortunately I have never had one with a card long enough to go down the chip shop fork route! I did have a Safrane in days of old - enormous squishy leather front seats - it was like driving a three peice sofa, with fuel economy to match!
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 08:02
  #112 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Uplinker View Post
Exactly. Unless you have raced or rallied cars, your left foot is unlikely to have the fine control and feel required to left-foot brake subtlety and effectively.

Left foot braking is all very well, and I did it myself, but if you drive a mix of manual and auto cars as I do, you might find out the expensive way that it is much safer to use your right foot for go and stop, your left foot only for clutch or just bracing your body through the corners.

Autos donít need a foot on the brake and accelerator pedals at the same time. (manuals do if you are heeling and toeing, but that is only really for racing). Autos either have torque convertors or auto clutches to hold them on an up-slope*, and some cars hold the brakes on for you when you push the pedal twice and then move your foot onto the accelerator for you to do a hill start.
If one practices enough, then one trains the muscles to work properly. LFB is a great technique for really improving the smoothness and progress in a drive - and I'm talking open road here, not city driving - by allowing a later transition from braking to being on the gas, and a smoother transition as well.

I've driven with an individual who'll LFB in a manual, and if he needs to, will move LF to the clutch, RF to the brake, and then heel and toe. All seamlessly done and lovely to watch. For an example by a master, watch Walter Rohrl...
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 08:04
  #113 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by Mike6567 View Post
Sorry but I am rather old fashioned and would not like to do my travels across France in any car that does not have a full size spare wheel.
Not many new cars come with this item now. (for info have a VW Passat Estate)
Why? Is it the 50km limit or is it 50kph limit? And why France?

We picked up a piece of steel like an arrow head an route the the ferry. Put the small wheel on and of course no space to put the punctured tyre anywhere though they had provided a bag. My children had to make space for the wheel.

First garage in Cherbourg just shrugged. Drove o another 20-30 miles and next garafer. Chap was brilliant, stopped work replaced the tyre and we were fixed. Had it been an odd tyre not in stock then it would have been a Green Flag moment.
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 08:49
  #114 (permalink)  
 
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Always a manual, always diesel and always European. I know Japanese cars are more reliable but they have no soul or style. Korean cars are plain awful and we won't even get started on American cars. That said, I live in Singapore and cannot afford one anyway but when on my hols and I rent a car, that what I try to adhere to. It doesn't always work, as I have had a Nissan Juke, or should that be Joke, what a piece of garbage it was...
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 10:05
  #115 (permalink)  
 
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Good point about the full size spare wheel, I hired a Volvo XC90 and ended up with a flat rear tyre, unfortunately unrepairable. Managed to limp it as far as the nearest tyre center on the space saver, luckily they had the unusual sized tyre in stock and luckily it was in the UK where distances between towns aren't that great.

When renting a car, take it as an opportunity to try something different. I enjoy driving a Mercedes or BMW for a few days but wouldn't want to be saddled with the ownership costs. Korean cars have improved immensely in the last few years and are nearly on a level with the Japanese. I'll take reliability and lower running cost over soul anytime.
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 10:40
  #116 (permalink)  
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Four flats in 40+ years - three 'foreign' objects spiking the tyre; one where the valve stem 'melted'!!
To the other extreme; Admittedly it was when I worked on a Seismic Survey Crew in the Aussie Outback (otherwise known as the GAFA) driving Toyota Landcruiser Diesel Utes, that I once set a record;

Seven flat tyres on one 12 hour working day!

And of course you had to fix them yourself at the end of the day's work!

When fixing the seventh and final one of the day; From splitting the rim to throwing the repaired wheel onto the back of my ute was timed, independently, at precisely seven minutes!
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 10:54
  #117 (permalink)  

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My car doesn't carry a spare wheel at all! Reason being that it has a limited slip diff and there is a size difference between the front and rear wheels (so you would need two spares to avoid diff damage). It was originally fitted with "run-flat" tyres, which are great for handling and grip, but not so good for comfort (there's a lot of bump-thump).

I got a hole in a rear tyre and drove it to a major tyre dealer, only to be told that it could be up ten working days to get a replacement because there were none in UK! I fitted a pair of normal tyres instead, which still had to be ordered in but only took three days(!). I now carry a latex injection/inflation pump and an old fashioned tyre repair kit, just in case I get another flat and can't get recovery (of which I'm fully aware, might be help, but might not).
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 11:57
  #118 (permalink)  
 
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ShyTorque, would not the front and rear wheel still have the same circumference?
Per
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 13:06
  #119 (permalink)  
 
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I said I'd never have a car which had no spare wheel, but by now that pretty well means I can't have a new car. Best compromise was to get the estate version and carry a spare in the boot - modern wheels are so big that one would completely fill the boot of the equivalent saloon (if you could get it in there)..
Other bit of poor design logic are the so-called four wheel drive systems that are front drive and only give you driven rear wheels when it "thinks" you need 'em - i.e. when it notices that poor grip has let go. A real four-wheel-drive system won't get into that state as easily and if it does the clever stuff can change the front/rear proportioning if it "thinks" it would help.
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Old 29th Sep 2018, 15:27
  #120 (permalink)  

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Originally Posted by Ancient Mariner View Post
ShyTorque, would not the front and rear wheel still have the same circumference?
Per
No, the rear wheels are larger in diameter as well as in width. The slight issue is that there is no room in the boot well for a spare wheel of sufficient diameter (tried that, a standard wheel won't go in).
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