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The silent war.

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The silent war.

Old 11th Sep 2018, 21:12
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The silent war.

Just a "heads up" as they say. This is a repeat of a programme about submarine operations during the cold war that was on a while ago. Absolutely fascinating - especially the interviews with the Russians. B.B.C. 4 22.00 Tuesday 18 th.
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Old 11th Sep 2018, 21:38
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Sound interesting. Will definetly be on my ‘to watch’ list. Used to know a ground handler that was an ex submariner on Hunter-Killers. During the Falkland war, while most of the RN went south, they went North to maintain a guard against the Soviets.
I also have vivid childhood memories (aged 9) of visiting a Olympus class Diesel-Electric submarine in Ipswich docks just before she was sold to Canada. A couple of years ago I met an ex crew member of her! (publican of my sister’s local pub.) Small World.

Last edited by Jump Complete; 11th Sep 2018 at 21:49.
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Old 12th Sep 2018, 00:01
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This has several surprising (to me) mentions of strategic use of systems.


https://www.quora.com/How-did-World-...und-6000-miles
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Old 12th Sep 2018, 00:20
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I also have vivid childhood memories (aged 9) of visiting a Olympus class Diesel-Electric submarine in Ipswich docks just before she was sold to Canada. A couple of years ago I met an ex crew member of her! (publican of my sister’s local pub.) Small World.
Do you mean Oberon Class HMS Olympus by any cance? sold to Canada in 89
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Old 12th Sep 2018, 01:48
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Met an electronics engineer once who claimed to have crashed one. He was working on a passive sonar system; due to a bug in the software it collided with the yacht they were shadowing.
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Old 12th Sep 2018, 07:50
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An erstwhile friend of mine was on the planes of a hunter killer a long time ago. During a "sneaky beaky" they collided with a Russian sub and the Russian Navy had an exercise running nearby. As the Russian sub shot to the surface (and was subsequently lost), the surface ships abandoned the exercise and set about hunting and depth charging HM Sub. This went on for 3 days before they managed to creep away. As they neared the Scottish coast, a boat load of dockyard maties met them and set about putting in place a wood and canvas structure to cover the damage to the fin. The sub was put in a floating dock and stayed hidden in that while repairs were carried out. During the original incident, my friend who was big, stocky lad put the planes to "hard to dive" and froze. He literally had to be knocked out by another member of the crew to get him to relinquish his hold on the planes before the boat dived into the sea bed. He eventually spent quite some time in hospital, learning to speak again, such was the degree of the shock he suffered.
I wish I could remember the name of the boat now. No doubt it will come back to me, probably around 03:00 as these things do!
Aah! I didn't have to wait until 03:00, the name just came back to me; HMS Warspite.

Last edited by KelvinD; 12th Sep 2018 at 20:59. Reason: Added name of submarine
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Old 12th Sep 2018, 09:09
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Originally Posted by Danny G View Post
Do you mean Oberon Class HMS Olympus by any cance? sold to Canada in 89
Yes, that would be it. 89 would have made me 13, just the right age to be fascinated by it, I guess.
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Old 12th Sep 2018, 15:00
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I visited the Historic Dockyard at Chatham last year and took a tour of HMS Ocelot, the Oberon Class submarine they have on display there. It is certainly an impressive vessel but I do not think the submarine service would be my first choice of career. I also read the "Silent Deep" last year and found it a fascinating record of the submarine service since the war and I have a deep admiration for all those who who served.
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Old 12th Sep 2018, 17:20
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Walked through the USS Nautilus in Groton. Quickly realised it was not for me. Not...at...all.
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Old 12th Sep 2018, 17:39
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You can walk 'through' an X-craft at Duxford. It has been
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Old 12th Sep 2018, 20:56
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I sneaked a day out on a submarine in South Africa. I was employed in the submarine support section but such was dearth of work (as they never went out!) I was more often to be found working on surface vessels. However, on one of those rare days when one of their subs went out, I wangled a day out on the pretence I was there to check on some bit of kit or other. Never again! Those French built Daphne class boats were renowned as death traps anyway but what alarmed me, after the excitement of the dive wore off, was the creaking and clanking as the pressure began to build on the hull. Thank God we were back in time for tea!
I pulled a similar stunt re "ongoing work" on one of their destroyers (Jan van Riebeeck, previously HMS Wessex) and had a glorious day sailing from Simons Town round the Cape of Good Hope to Capetown at a reported 30 knots. Destroyers of that era (built in WW2) had a low waist in terms of freeboard so the bow wave was seen going by at 5 ft higher than we were. A much better day out than on the bloody sub!
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Old 12th Sep 2018, 23:51
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Originally Posted by KelvinD View Post
An erstwhile friend of mine was on the planes of a hunter killer a long time ago. During a "sneaky beaky" they collided with a Russian sub and the Russian Navy had an exercise running nearby. As the Russian sub shot to the surface (and was subsequently lost), the surface ships abandoned the exercise and set about hunting and depth charging HM Sub. This went on for 3 days before they managed to creep away. As they neared the Scottish coast, a boat load of dockyard maties met them and set about putting in place a wood and canvas structure to cover the damage to the fin. The sub was put in a floating dock and stayed hidden in that while repairs were carried out. During the original incident, my friend who was big, stocky lad put the planes to "hard to dive" and froze. He literally had to be knocked out by another member of the crew to get him to relinquish his hold on the planes before the boat dived into the sea bed. He eventually spent quite some time in hospital, learning to speak again, such was the degree of the shock he suffered.
I wish I could remember the name of the boat now. No doubt it will come back to me, probably around 03:00 as these things do!
Aah! I didn't have to wait until 03:00, the name just came back to me; HMS Warspite.
This incident is featured in one of the programmes - it's a two parter.
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Old 13th Sep 2018, 06:56
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Thanks Phil. I shall be watching.
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Old 13th Sep 2018, 14:10
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Blind Man's Bluff is a GREAT read about the USN nuclear sub force during the Cold War. Truly amazing what they got up to.

There's a late WW2 U-Boat recovered from the Baltic and now docked in Bremen harbour. Well worth a visit.

I'm afraid I disgraced myself. Blame Das Boot. Shouted "ALARMMMMM!!!" in the conning tower and was asked to leave.

Worth every Euro.
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Old 14th Sep 2018, 02:40
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The Oberon class HMAS Ovens is on display in Fremantle for a walk thru / crawl thru tour.
That tour clears up any images of a group meeting around the periscope(s), unless it is
a meeting of anorexic dwarfs.
I could heft my bulk through the pressure hatches. But only just.
Cozy. Very cozy.

I sat next to a Kiwi on a CX flight two weeks ago who had been a cook on subs .
He mentioned how only he, as the cook, and the Captain were allowed daily showers; very brief ones though.
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Old 14th Sep 2018, 07:51
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My first job on one of the S. African Daphne class boats was to remove a ground/air radio for repair. Getting it out involved lying on the deck, curled around the periscope standard with people stepping over me as they passed by. Horrible job!
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Old 14th Sep 2018, 08:14
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Originally Posted by KelvinD View Post
An erstwhile friend of mine was on the planes of a hunter killer a long time ago. During a "sneaky beaky" they collided with a Russian sub and the Russian Navy had an exercise running nearby. As the Russian sub shot to the surface (and was subsequently lost), the surface ships abandoned the exercise and set about hunting and depth charging HM Sub. This went on for 3 days before they managed to creep away. As they neared the Scottish coast, a boat load of dockyard maties met them and set about putting in place a wood and canvas structure to cover the damage to the fin. The sub was put in a floating dock and stayed hidden in that while repairs were carried out. During the original incident, my friend who was big, stocky lad put the planes to "hard to dive" and froze. He literally had to be knocked out by another member of the crew to get him to relinquish his hold on the planes before the boat dived into the sea bed. He eventually spent quite some time in hospital, learning to speak again, such was the degree of the shock he suffered.
I wish I could remember the name of the boat now. No doubt it will come back to me, probably around 03:00 as these things do!
Aah! I didn't have to wait until 03:00, the name just came back to me; HMS Warspite.
I heard the same story the submarine was HMS Alliance I can send you the video if you pm me your email address
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Old 14th Sep 2018, 13:55
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my video taken back in 2007 the spying info is at the end of the clip

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Old 14th Sep 2018, 16:44
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Jack: I think he was retelling a personal account, rather than an account from HMS Alliance. My oppo's account was that they had been tailing the Russian sub, recording engine and prop sounds. The way they did that meant sitting directly astern of the Russian boat in the Sonar blind spot and matching their own revolutions to those of the Russian. This was going very well and when the Russian boat stopped, Warspite also stopped directly astern. When the Russian boat started to move again, Warspite again matched propellor revolutions. What they didn't know was the Russian boat had gone astern and Warspite was going ahead. There was an almighty smash and Warspite initially headed for the bottom, out of control (plus my mate's efforts on the forward planes!) They immediately surfaced with the Russian boat parked on their deck. The Russian boat slid off and was lost. The ships of the nearby surface fleet spotted this and "it all went wrong"!
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Old 14th Sep 2018, 17:12
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From my Page 220, #4383 on "Pilot.s Brevet" Thread:
Danny samples Life (Under) the Ocean Wave (Part I)It seems that the Navy decided to extend the hand of friendship to these light-blue people come among them. HMS Vernon was selected to invite a small number (three or four, IIRC) at a time from Thorney, for a day's instructional "course" on torpedoes ! As we knew nothing (and had absolutely no need to know anything) about these, it is hard to resist the conclusion that this was just a "jolly", but no less welcome for all that.

Shortly after our arrival at Thorney, I was detailed as one of the first groups nominated for this, and went over to Portsmouth, as advised, in battledress. In the morning they told us all about the fearful things, but the little I recall is that they come in two sizes (18 and 21 inch dia) and hydrogen-peroxide torpedoes are a Bad Idea, and that shoehorning any kind into the subs is a tricky business.

The gilt on the gingerbread came after lunch: a trip round the bay in a submarine ! For this task they had selected an "S" Class 'boat', the "Subtle" . I gathered that she was an old vessel eking out her last days on odd jobs. Our Captain was a mere Lieutenant, and I think he had a Sub-Lieut and just a skeleton crew. We embarked rather apprehensively; but all managed to get aboard without disgracing ourselves by falling into the harbour or down any ladders.

First we were assembled together for a short instruction on the use of the Davis Escape Apparatus (gulp), and then the noisy diesels cranked up and there was much smoke and a lot of "Let go forrard" and "Let go aft" business familiar to everybody from the films. We had now been marshalled up to the conning-tower to see how things were done.

He didn't hit anything on the way out (although some ships did seem a trifle close), and soon we were chugging along, making for the open sea (Solent, actually). On the way, all hands not needed to work the ship (two men and a boy ?) were mustered on the foredeck for a touching little ceremony probably unchanged since Nelson's day.

At the top of a large bluff was a signal station: we would pass quite close under this. As we neared the spot, someone blew a whistle *, the troops came to attention, our Ensign was dipped, the Captain saluted: we all saluted, as clearly it was the thing to do. Far above us, a great Ensign slowly dipped and rose in acknowledgement. Obviously we were "booking-out". This procedure was repeated on the way back, so that a hue and cry could be raised if we didn't turn up on time.

And then we were running in open waters with the land receding behind us.

As this is rather a long story, I have chopped it into two, this is the natural break, the rest tomorrow - with luck.

* (tongue-in-cheek to tease Union Jack - of course I know it's the Boatswine's Pipe !)

Evenin', chaps,

Danny42C.


Sun's over the yardarm !
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