Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > PPRuNe Social > Jet Blast
Reload this Page >

Trapped in a Thai Cave

Jet Blast Topics that don't fit the other forums. Rules of Engagement apply.

Trapped in a Thai Cave

Old 3rd Jul 2018, 02:25
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: apogee
Age: 65
Posts: 59
Trapped in a Thai Cave

9 Days, but they've been found.
Now there is the really, really, difficult bit.
Rescue by committee.
https://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-44691457
meadowrun is offline  
Old 3rd Jul 2018, 02:31
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2014
Location: Mainland
Posts: 27
Splendid news that they've been found.
Will be continuing to follow this with interest.
Karearea is offline  
Old 3rd Jul 2018, 04:12
  #3 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Australia
Posts: 37
Was great news to wake up to this morning. Been following it since the start. Must admit I was starting fear the worst.
Lantern10 is offline  
Old 3rd Jul 2018, 04:39
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Balikpapan, INDONESIA
Age: 68
Posts: 535
I thought this was going to be like the one last week on the couple from Nigeria; or was it Kenya?
WingNut60 is online now  
Old 3rd Jul 2018, 10:11
  #5 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2003
Location: closer to hell
Age: 48
Posts: 904
Dunno what all the fuss is about. I've been stuck in a few wet Pattaya beach caves before and no one came to rescue me
troppo is offline  
Old 3rd Jul 2018, 10:33
  #6 (permalink)  
Resident insomniac
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: N54 58 34 W02 01 21
Age: 75
Posts: 1,859
The concept of these youngsters being 'trapped' (albeit safely) for weeks - maybe months - raises questions of how they will be looked after (and whether their 'guide' will be held responsible - or whether the parents will be just relieved that they are alive).

It will be a fascinating story to follow.
G-CPTN is offline  
Old 3rd Jul 2018, 10:40
  #7 (permalink)  

Avoid imitations
 
Join Date: Nov 2000
Location: Wandering the FIR and cyberspace often at highly unsociable times
Posts: 12,698
As a father I can only imagine what the parents of these young lads must have already gone through (let alone the trapped ones themselves) and there's still a long way to go yet.
I hope this ends well, for all concerned.
ShyTorque is offline  
Old 3rd Jul 2018, 10:44
  #8 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: SW England
Age: 73
Posts: 3,821
Memories of the rescue of the Chilean miners back in 2010 (was it really 8 years ago?) That took over 2 months but ended well. Amazing what human ingenuity can achieve. I guess these lads will have a long wait as well, but it's all looking good for an eventual rescue.
Tankertrashnav is offline  
Old 3rd Jul 2018, 10:47
  #9 (permalink)  
Danny42C
Guest
 
Posts: n/a
A couple of OBEs should be on the way, surely ? - (probably not, as they're not footballers !)

(reminds me of one of Kipling's "Plain Tales from the Hills: "At Twenty-Two")
 
Old 3rd Jul 2018, 12:19
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: There and here
Posts: 1,908
The boys looked remarkably 'ok' if you imagine that they've been in the cool dark for nearly 2 weeks. It's great that they've been found and are well. A question, how did locals who would have the best information on weather and safety get themselves into such a quandary ? Tourists, you could understand, but perhaps not locals who apparently visited each week after football training.
SpringHeeledJack is online now  
Old 3rd Jul 2018, 12:22
  #11 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Florida
Posts: 5,303
From what I read they are still trapped,....... found yes

much more for this drama and follow on book and movie deals

What are the possible moves from this point?
lomapaseo is offline  
Old 3rd Jul 2018, 12:48
  #12 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 1998
Location: south coast
Posts: 404
There was talk this morning of getting full facial diving gear ( oxygen equipped) to them and then training them to dive over a period of time and then each " returning" through the ( now) flooded caves one at a time......
Barcli is offline  
Old 3rd Jul 2018, 14:25
  #13 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: South Africa
Age: 83
Posts: 1,327
Originally Posted by Danny42C View Post
A couple of OBEs should be on the way, surely ? - (probably not, as they're not footballers !)

(reminds me of one of Kipling's "Plain Tales from the Hills: "At Twenty-Two")
OBE's?

Aren't George Medal's appropriate in these circumstances?

TTN is the expert in this area.
ian16th is offline  
Old 3rd Jul 2018, 14:30
  #14 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2008
Location: South Africa
Age: 83
Posts: 1,327
Originally Posted by Barcli View Post
There was talk this morning of getting full facial diving gear ( oxygen equipped) to them and then training them to dive over a period of time and then each " returning" through the ( now) flooded caves one at a time......
An added complication, as if any were needed, but I saw it reported, that none of the kids can swim!!!!

As for comparing this to the Chilean episode, in Chile, the victims were adult miners. Well versed in underground procedures. Here we are dealing with children. The mental problems for them must be horrendous.
ian16th is offline  
Old 3rd Jul 2018, 14:36
  #15 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Canadian Shield
Posts: 536
I did a couple of years caving back in the late 80s. On one trip near Ingleton, Yorks, three of us were stuck for 20-30 mins when our lamps all failed after a 3-hr trip turned into 5-hrs after heavy rain flooded our intended exit route.

For anyone who has not done it, it is hard to describe TOTAL darkness. It is like a physical thing. You can wave your hand right in front of your face and there is NOTHING.

30 mins for us felt like hours. And we knew help would definitely be coming. How those guys held it together for 10 days is quite incredible. A real achievement.

OBEs for those UK rescuers who flew out. Yes. Definitely!

As they themselves said: "Brilliant!"
er340790 is offline  
Old 3rd Jul 2018, 14:51
  #16 (permalink)  
Resident insomniac
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: N54 58 34 W02 01 21
Age: 75
Posts: 1,859
Originally Posted by er340790 View Post
For anyone who has not done it, it is hard to describe TOTAL darkness. It is like a physical thing. You can wave your hand right in front of your face and there is NOTHING.

30 mins for us felt like hours. And we knew help would definitely be coming. How those guys held it together for 10 days is quite incredible. A real achievement.
Something that I had not considered.
Any torches or sources of light would have run out long ago.
At what stage did they find their refuge?
What activities (such as bodily functions) have those boys had to perform in total darkness? - with risk of falling into the water . . .

I understand that the temperature is quite warm (26 degC?), but to those used to tropical temperatures that is probably 'cold'.

No food? Hard to keep body core temperature stable?
G-CPTN is offline  
Old 3rd Jul 2018, 15:53
  #17 (permalink)  

Controversial, moi?
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
Location: UK
Posts: 1,575
It was an extraordinary example of Thai culture how polite the English speaker was when talking to the divers. He ended with very polite and profuse thanks despite their ordeal being far from over.
M.Mouse is offline  
Old 3rd Jul 2018, 16:13
  #18 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2017
Location: Republic of Texas
Posts: 92
I'm a cert deep water, wreck, cave, and open water diver. Looking at the BBC info on where they are trapped, having these kids try to SCUBA out is amazingly perilous. These kids will have to go from not knowing how to swim, to advanced SCUBA dive techniques all while mostly in murky, dark water, with a hard roof overhead. I'm not saying it can't be done, but the obstacles to success in going out by SCUBA are very high. First problem is that there is no such thing as a childs full face SCUBA equipment. It just isn't made. Maybe a small full-face mask will fit some of them, but - it's going to leak water. It will no question at all leak water. Next is that there are sections where it's so tight that appears one can't wear their own tank, and that means taking the tank off, and pushing it ahead or you(or behind, not recommended), and then recovering it on the other side. I've done this in dark water, and the orientation and confusion factor is very high. Add in low visibility water, and it becomes near impossible.

I understand why they are trying to pump out the sections first. If the water level can get down just enough to keep their heads out of the water and wade through that is far better than any kind of SCUBA method for these kids. Learning cave diving at 13 years old, in a dark cave, while scared spit-less is a recipe for failure. Hope it goes well.
ethicalconundrum is offline  
Old 3rd Jul 2018, 16:46
  #19 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2014
Location: australia
Age: 77
Posts: 185
The problem is this is just the start of the rain season here in Chiangrai. The caves are usually closed from the 1st of july but in this case that was a little too late. They expect that if they wait the waters will rise and make it even harder. Great work from all, the Thai people and divers and the overseas divers who probably have a wider range of rescue diving techniques than the generally well trained Thai Seals.
Aparently they are now looking if hyperbairc chambers will be needed as they have been breathing pressurised air for 10 days,
It is great they have been found, they have been lucky though this is just the start.
harrryw is offline  
Old 3rd Jul 2018, 17:12
  #20 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2010
Location: Balikpapan, INDONESIA
Age: 68
Posts: 535
Originally Posted by G-CPTN View Post
The concept of these youngsters being 'trapped' (albeit safely) for weeks - maybe months - raises questions of how they will be looked after (and whether their 'guide' will be held responsible - or whether the parents will be just relieved that they are alive).

It will be a fascinating story to follow.
Thankfully, the "litigation culture" of the west has not yet overrun the Thai / Buddhist culture.

As to the kids not being able to swim, I think something may be lost in the translation there.
Maybe they meant "unable to swim underwater", or whatever.

Most, though not all Thai kids can swim. They have been brought up on the banks of a klong or river.
Maybe some of the city kids miss out, but not many.
WingNut60 is online now  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.