Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > PPRuNe Social > Jet Blast
Reload this Page >

Lava outbreak on Hawaii island

Jet Blast Topics that don't fit the other forums. Rules of Engagement apply.

Lava outbreak on Hawaii island

Old 6th May 2018, 10:44
  #21 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Japan
Posts: 761
The guy on the roof was lucky the wind was blowing the other way.
jolihokistix is offline  
Old 6th May 2018, 11:03
  #22 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Hawaii
Posts: 121
I don't think he would have been on the roof if it wasn't!
Hokulea is offline  
Old 6th May 2018, 11:14
  #23 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Hawaii
Posts: 121
Ironically, my first experience of an earthquake was actually in the UK! I was in Preston, Lancs. at the time.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1990_B...tle_earthquake
Hokulea is offline  
Old 6th May 2018, 12:11
  #24 (permalink)  
Gnome de PPRuNe
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Too close to Croydon for comfort
Age: 56
Posts: 7,426
Apparently I should have felt the recent Welsh earthquake where I was in NW Surrey but I didn't notice it... I was outside in a quiet garden at the time.

All the best to all you Hawaiians, hopefully damage will be just property and nothing more precious.
treadigraph is online now  
Old 6th May 2018, 16:56
  #25 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Posts: 390
Snoop Shake, Rattle, and Roll!

I lived in Daly City, California (a suburb of San Francisco), for a year back in the Second Millennium. The house in which I dwelled literally straddled the San Andreas fault and I was constantly paranoiac that "The Big One" would swallow me, the house, and most of San Francisco in one fell swoop. San Franciscans didn't seem at all worried about earthquakes, even though I read that downtown streets and sidewalks would be covered in plate glass shards shaken from skyscrapers to a depth of fourteen feet!

I left Baghdad by the Bay in 1984 having experienced not so much as an earthquiver. I wound up in Cincinnati where, on my second day, three strong jolts struck the city! The New Madrid fault was relieving a little pressure awaiting an encore rupture, the forerunner of which in 1811-12 rang church bells in Boston and caused the Mighty Mississippi to run backward. I am here to tell you that being in an earthquake leaves one with a feeling of complete helplessness! I wish our Hawaiian compatriots a rapid return to the beauty and serenity of that gorgeous island chain.

- Ed

Last edited by cavuman1; 8th May 2018 at 15:28. Reason: Insert Date
cavuman1 is online now  
Old 6th May 2018, 17:42
  #26 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: apogee
Age: 66
Posts: 60
San Franciscans didn't seem at all worried about earthquakes
Mostly too young to understand absolute terror and have the old - "Neverhappentomeitis".
meadowrun is online now  
Old 6th May 2018, 18:55
  #27 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: California
Posts: 344
meadowrun,
Not totally "Neverhappentomeitis", more of an awareness of what to do when it happened, being aware of your surroundings, building types, etc.
I lived in SF and the surrounds for 40 years and experienced 2 earthquakes, including the '89 Loma Prieta.
The one that really scared me though was in Hokkaido, Japan, which happened at about 10 pm.... I heard it coming and the 21-second shaking was very intense.
However, that video of the lava river running down the street is pretty damn scary!!!
f
fleigle is offline  
Old 6th May 2018, 19:09
  #28 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: apogee
Age: 66
Posts: 60
Awareness is a good thing but it's usually spread thin. How many people in SF did you know who had Disaster Preparedness Kits?
Any major city that experiences more than the bit of shaking and stuff falling off shelves they are somewhat used to (oh...7+ or so) will almost certainly descend into total panic amidst the fires, bodies and wreckage.....
and emergency services ???...
Snafu comes to mind, certainly for the first few (or more) days.

Up here, I have a vision of toppled high rise condos littering English Bay and afterwards - much improved views of the Coast Range mountains and much whining.
meadowrun is online now  
Old 6th May 2018, 22:31
  #29 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: California
Posts: 344
meadowrun,
There was little panic and lots of ordinary people helping out, as the filmed coverage showed.
I don't remember any SNAFU, or any shortages of food, water, or critical services.
The rescue efforts at the collapsed section of the Bay Bridge, and the freeway east of there were carried out in a professional manner.
Are you just doing the usual "look down your nose at anything that happens in the US?"
Take your snarky comments elsewhere.
f
fleigle is offline  
Old 7th May 2018, 00:01
  #30 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: apogee
Age: 66
Posts: 60
Just saying you (SF) haven't had a major since 1906 (est. 7.8). Not isolated damage ones - the pretty well overall, far reaching devastation type.
Not being snarky - we are as little prepared for it as anyone else really is.
meadowrun is online now  
Old 7th May 2018, 01:39
  #31 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: San Jose
Posts: 726
Originally Posted by meadowrun View Post
Just saying you (SF) haven't had a major since 1906 (est. 7.8). Not isolated damage ones - the pretty well overall, far reaching devastation type.
Not being snarky - we are as little prepared for it as anyone else really is.
Loma Prieta in 1989 did a fair bit of damage. The most we've had here since I arrived was a 4 on the local fault line. Normally it rumbles along with a string of 2-3 that don't propagate that far (I think we're on the same bit of bedrock so we feel them) but the 4 I felt in Sunnyvale. Apparently our big dogs were standing side by side in the doorway looking at my wife after it happened, so either they were blaming her for waking them up or they've read the old earthquake manual.
llondel is offline  
Old 7th May 2018, 01:51
  #32 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2001
Location: south of Cirencester, north of Lyneham
Age: 73
Posts: 1,248
My employer had a facility in Scott's Valley - very close to the Lome Prieta epicentre, and six months later, the devastation in Los Gatos had to be seen to be believed. Several employees had major home damage, and the company had a world wide appeal to employees for donations to help those affected. This raised some $15,000 and the company matched it to four times the employee donations......So much for uncaring employers.....One of my colleagues living up in the mountains near the summit around Highway 17 couldn't get home for three days because the road had disappeared, which was rough for his cats.
radeng is offline  
Old 7th May 2018, 02:29
  #33 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2013
Location: apogee
Age: 66
Posts: 60
For those who might be vulnerable to any major disaster this might be of interest, tho' most will be "not a bad idea, maybe I'll do it later".
And don't forget to fill the bathtub if you have one left.
What Do You Need In a Survival Kit | American Red Cross
meadowrun is online now  
Old 7th May 2018, 07:31
  #34 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Hawaii
Posts: 121
Having a "go bag" or survival kit is something that gets drummed into us continuously. I have one in the car and one in the house and suspect most others here have similar arrangements.

As for the latest updates, there are now ten fissures although some of the initial ones have quietened down, no-one knows if that will last. Very active seismicity continues but fortunately, there have been no large earthquakes since Friday. The latest civil defense message says 26 houses have been destroyed in Leilani. Cracks have opened up on highway 130 which is the only main route out of Lower Puna although we haven't been told where they are and it's not clear if they are due to volcanic activity or the earthquake, it would be very bad news if lava appears on that highway.

As mentioned above, everyone is helping each other out and most if not all of the evacuees are with friends or family outside the danger zone - others are in shelters. Some community members are setting up information points which shows how poor the official response has been. Although there are some bizarre and inaccurate social media comments, our own local social media network is 1) self-policing and 2) providing great information and support to all those affected.
Hokulea is offline  
Old 8th May 2018, 12:35
  #35 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: There and here
Posts: 2,076
Apparently Honolulu residents are being badly affected by VOG from the eruptions due to the prevailing winds.....
SpringHeeledJack is offline  
Old 8th May 2018, 18:30
  #36 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Southampton
Posts: 722
I did tour the volcanic areas of Lanzarote, which was very interesting, particularly the vast lava field from a previous eruption. Once it cools, it does leave rather a mess and it's obviously not something that can be cleaned up afterwards, unlike the removal of fallen down buildings.

I certainly wouldn't like to experience the feeling of helplessness that people must have, seeing that the lava flow is heading in their direction and knowing that it's not going to take any prisoners with regard to their homes.

Good luck to all those involved, I hope you all stay safe.
Saintsman is offline  
Old 9th May 2018, 02:08
  #37 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Japan
Posts: 761
If you were to line the road sides in susceptible areas with deep and wide ditches, would not any new lava tend to flow in the direction you wish, at least in a moderate flow?
jolihokistix is offline  
Old 9th May 2018, 05:57
  #38 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Hawaii
Posts: 121
The problem with the current activity is fissures are forming which is where the lava is erupting. The flows so far are relatively small and slow moving, but there's no way to predict where the next breakouts will occur. Many of the breakouts have occurred on the roads themselves (making them completely impassable). The second problem is the type of lava that's erupting. It's 'a'a which is slow moving but build up thick layers. It tends to go where it wants rather than follow ditches, although it will, in general, flow downhill. Then there are the dangerous SO2 emissions which are already causing severe problems.

Latest: after about a 24-hr period during which activity paused, we had two new breakouts today followed by a new emergency evacuation order for some residents near the eruption as it looks as if that community will get cut off. Lava has also destroyed the water lines to much of the area south and south-east of the eruption. A new line was put in but the recent breakouts threaten that one, and if that goes, thousands will be without water with only one difficult-to-navigate evacuation route. The main highways to that area have been closed due to cracks which may become new fissures.
Hokulea is offline  
Old 9th May 2018, 06:01
  #39 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2013
Location: Everett, WA
Age: 65
Posts: 3,064
I had a week long vacation on the Big Island with my extended family a couple years ago. My sister and I took a 3+ hour helicopter tour (money amazingly well spent), and we spent the better part of an hour around Kilauea. Amazing views (yes we got to see a boiling lava cauldron), although I couldn't help but think about how bad would be if we had an engine problem and had to land 'soon' (to be fair, it was my first ride on a helicopter - I continually had to remind myself that our lift wasn't overly depend on forward speed - my subconscious was constantly screaming 'WE'RE GOING TO STALL' - I mentioned that to our pilot when we did a short fuel stop, he mentioned he'd had a 777 captain the week before that had warned him 'Don't worry if I scream'...). I found the creeping lava flows particularly interesting as they moved through forests of palm trees. The top of the lava was relatively cool, so as the lava advanced the base of the trees would burn and the trees would topple onto the cooler top layer - eventually the trees would dry out and some small fissure would ignite them - so you'd see these fields of lava with large numbers of palm trees laying on top - with random trees burning a hundred or more yards behind the advancing lava front.
Flying around the Big Island it's amazing to see how much of it consists of old - and not many so old - lava flows (including the massive muli-billion dollar development were we were staying - the complex was literally in the middle of a not so old lava flow). I suppose the locals just fall in love with the beauty, and accept that in order to live there they have to accept some risk that mother earth may decide to reclaim her property..

Last edited by tdracer; 9th May 2018 at 06:23.
tdracer is offline  
Old 9th May 2018, 06:44
  #40 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Hawaii
Posts: 121
I'm glad you had the opportunity to get that experience, tdracer- it's quite special, isn't it? Incidentally, that boiling lava cauldron disappeared over the last few days as the lava has drained away into the new eruption site. There's a concern here that if the lake drains below the water table then it's possible that there will be an explosive eruption at Kilauea's summit - it's happened before:

https://volcanoes.usgs.gov/volcanoes...alemaumau.html

And yes,people here know the risk and it is part of choosing to live here. The island is divided up into "lava zones" and your house insurance is based on that. Zone 1 and 2 are the areas with the most recent activity, so insurance can be expensive. The current eruption is in lava zone 1, so not unexpected.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lava_Flow_Hazard_Zones
Hokulea is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.