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Best World War II Movies

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Best World War II Movies

Old 5th Mar 2018, 16:22
  #41 (permalink)  
 
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"What did you do in the war Daddy?"
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Old 5th Mar 2018, 16:47
  #42 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Krystal n chips View Post

Plenty to choose from, but thus far we've been spared a nomination for one of the worst "Ice Cold in Alex "....thankfully.
Not sure why anybody would think of 'Ice Cold' as being a bad film,it was well acted and highly entertaining and young Sylvia looked lovely .

What would have made KnC's blood boil though was that in the original book it was the Sgt Major that got the Lootenant Nurse - but obviously that was not deemed acceptable in 1958 and so Capt Anson got the girl LOL.
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Old 5th Mar 2018, 17:00
  #43 (permalink)  
 
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rog747 - I think your tastes are what might be described as catholic. Are there any WW2 films you don't like?

I see you include The English Patient. As I said to Mrs TTN when we walked out of the cinema - "well that's two hours of my life I won't ever get back". She had to restrain me from slashing my wrists half way through.

Awful!

(Oh and as for Pearl Harbor - that was a joke, right?)
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Old 5th Mar 2018, 17:08
  #44 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by tow1709 View Post
Rog747 - glad to see "the Sea shall not have them" get a mention. This was the very first film of any genre I ever saw on TV, being screened on the day we got our first TV back in 1961. I was allowed to stay up late and watch the end, despite school in the morning.

Another of the Sunday afternoon set was San Demetrio, London, telling the story of the salvaging of the petrol tanker of that name after the attack on convoy HX 84 by the German pocket battleship Admiral Scheer on 5 November 1940.
San Demetrio, London

not seen this thanks - will look out for it - maybe on talking pictures TV freeview CH 81 sky 343

edit - i do recall this - they wanted to save the tanker full of oil which was so needed

Last edited by rog747; 5th Mar 2018 at 17:19.
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Old 5th Mar 2018, 17:14
  #45 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Tankertrashnav View Post
rog747 - I think your tastes are what might be described as catholic. Are there any WW2 films you don't like?

I see you include The English Patient. As I said to Mrs TTN when we walked out of the cinema - "well that's two hours of my life I won't ever get back". She had to restrain me from slashing my wrists half way through.

Awful!

(Oh and as for Pearl Harbor - that was a joke, right?)
lol
well plenty i haven't mentioned especially those made in the 70's and 80's plus many US made films although from here to eternity perhaps should get a mention
i like the pacific war and would like to find some decent movies about it
well pearl harbor was one i thought i would like - the CGI was good and the nurses...

english patient i like for the photography - sort of out of africa - ish

i included ice cold in alex BTW
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Old 5th Mar 2018, 17:16
  #46 (permalink)  
 
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Did not immediately notice anyone mentioning one of my favorites---


-



PATTON!!
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Old 5th Mar 2018, 17:25
  #47 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by Tankertrashnav View Post



K & C - we have crossed swords on political matters many a time, but I have never been so shocked as at your description of Ice Cold in Alex as "one of the worst"! If you consider John Mills, Anthony Quayle, Sylvia Syms and Harry Andrews as "nondescript and not over talented actors" then I would like to hear who you do consider talented. Incidentally it was made in the same year as Bridge on the River Kwai, 1958 - a vintage year for WW2 films, and both of those are near the top of my list.
TTN.

We've had a difference of opinion over this before as well.

As I say, I consider all of the British films made about the war in this period to be nothing other than jingoism. Hackneyed plots / scripts / dialogue and equally ham acting, in particular from the first name on your list. His "character " acting was abysmal.

There was a series about the British film industry not too long ago and they more or less admitted it was a gravy train for a small pool of actors who obviously did very well given all they had to do was portray a stereotype of the character they were playing.

The ending to "Ice Cold in Alex" is dire....the bit where they are all in a bar drinking happily.

Anthony Quayle I will concede on however.

To be honest, I can't really think of any decent actors from that period.

Last edited by Krystal n chips; 5th Mar 2018 at 18:00.
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Old 5th Mar 2018, 18:58
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I thought 'The Hill' was pretty good showing another aspect of what also happens during wars.
Harry Andrews was very good as the RSM and Ian Hendry as the psychopathic NCO
' From here to Eternity' was a brilliant film with first class actors and script.
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Old 5th Mar 2018, 18:59
  #49 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Tankertrashnav View Post
I see you include The English Patient. As I said to Mrs TTN when we walked out of the cinema - "well that's two hours of my life I won't ever get back". She had to restrain me from slashing my wrists half way through.

Awful!
Well, it was aimed at a rather sophisticated audience!
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Old 5th Mar 2018, 19:12
  #50 (permalink)  
 
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Bit of a sucker for Murphy’s War and Hannibal jones with Oliver Reed.
Cat 3 of course
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Old 5th Mar 2018, 19:22
  #51 (permalink)  
 
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All quiet on the western front ( 1930 original )

Birdsong

Kilo 2 Bravo ( Kajaki)

Perhaps more in the anti war genre?
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Old 5th Mar 2018, 19:33
  #52 (permalink)  
 
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Sorry didnít RTFQ ! WW 11 only !
How about .. in a nautical vein
The cruel sea
Das Boot
Sink the Bismarck
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Old 5th Mar 2018, 22:00
  #53 (permalink)  
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Great input, and I have few disagreements (outside of rog747's list - seriously dude, Pearl Harbor a great movie?), and a handful that I'm not familiar with that I'll need to look into.
Finfly1, I did mention Patton as a great movie, I just can't get over them portraying the Germans using Patton tanks - they didn't even bother to try to hide it with some add-ons.
Oh, another honorable mention for Cat 2) (or maybe 2.5), "Hell is for Hero's" with Steve McQueen (I'm a big McQueen fan).

BTW, I'm hoping someone out there can help me with this - I have a memory fragment of a WWII movie that watched on TV with my dad roughly 50 years ago (so it's likely made before 1965). Anyway, the fragment is two Allied tanks (probably American) hide in barn while a couple German tanks are approaching. As the lead German tank is coming up out of a ditch - exposing the unarmored belly - the Allied tanks both fire, causing the German to actually flip over backwards (rather unlikely outcome I'd think, but obviously a memorable scene). I have no idea what movie that might be, and I've watched dozens of old WWII movies over the years hoping to find that scene with no luck. Any one know what movie that might have been?
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Old 5th Mar 2018, 22:05
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"Battle of the Bulge"?? (made in 1965)
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Old 5th Mar 2018, 22:40
  #55 (permalink)  
 
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"Conspiracy" (2001). Depiction of the 1942 Wannsee conference where the "final solution" was hammered out. Disquieting, to say the least.
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Old 5th Mar 2018, 22:55
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How about Conspiracy?

I thought the acting was superb
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Old 5th Mar 2018, 23:10
  #57 (permalink)  
 
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Old 5th Mar 2018, 23:51
  #58 (permalink)  
 
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Well, it was aimed at a rather sophisticated audience!
Ouch !

I was teaching at the time, and at school the next day one of our teachers told me she had been in tears during the film.

I told her I had been too!

The ending to "Ice Cold in Alex" is dire....the bit where they are all in a bar drinking happily.
Oh come on - that's the best bit! So good I remember Carlsberg used it for a TV ad about 20 years ago.
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Old 6th Mar 2018, 00:32
  #59 (permalink)  
 
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Just to add to the list:

Captain Correlli's Mandolin - light fiction with a serious undertone ...

To Hell and Back (Audie Murphy's 'autobiography')

And while I've both watched & read Stephen Ambrose's "Band of Brothers" be aware there is considerable fiction/exaggeration by him of Easy Company actions
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Old 6th Mar 2018, 00:57
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Originally Posted by Mr Mac View Post
Fury - ex tanker from late 70,s so know something of armoured warfare, and no Tiger would go charging into an open field at oncoming enemy armour.
I'm not disagreeing with your knowledge of tank warfare tactics, Mr Mac, nor your characterization of the Tiger battle being farfetched, however, overall the movie received praise from many a former tanker as to its accuracy and the director went to great pains to recreate many of the battle scenes:

Though at first glance, Fury may seem as if it's just another World War II movie with a stellar cast (I mean, Brad Pitt, Shia Labeouf, Jon Bernthal, Logan Lerman, Michael PeŮa, and Scott Eastwood? Yes, please), don't write it off as that just yet: While yes, the movie deals with the much-employed setting of World War II, it's actually much more true-to-life than it seems — even if it's not based on one singular story. From Street Kings writer/director David Ayer, Fury is actually based on a collection of true stories from real-life army veterans who spent their time during World War II in tanks, just like Pitt's tank crew in the film...

...The result was extensive research about soldiers who were real "tankers" during the war. In Fury , Pitt portrays US Army Staff Sergeant Don "Wardaddy" Collier, who's the head of a tanker crew maneuvering a Sherman tank across Germany in a single day toward the end of the war. According to the Charlotte Observer , Pitt spoke with veterans about their experiences, including a now 90-year-old man named Ray Stewart who fought at the Battle of the Bulge as a tank gunner and driver.



In the following, an account of the author of Death Traps: The Survival of an American Armored Division in World War II., Lt Belton Cooper shared a lone tanker's fight with a German infantry unit and was the story that inspired the movie Fury:
“In the fighting around Hastenrath and Scherpenseel, the tankers, without adequate infantry support, performed almost superhuman acts of heroism to hold on throughout the night. It was reported that one of the tankers, in his tank on a road junction, was the only surviving member of his crew but was determined to hold his position at all costs.

The lone tanker had previously sighted his 76mm tank gun down the middle of the road. He depressed the mechanism slightly and loaded a 76mm HE [high explosive—used against non-armored targets]. As the Germans advanced in parallel columns along each side of the road, he fired. The HE shell hit the ground about 150 feet in front of the tank and ricocheted to a height of about three feet before exploding.

The shock took the Germans completely by surprise. The American tanker continued to fire all the HE he had as rapidly as possible, swinging the turret around to spray the German infantry, who were trying to escape into the fields on both sides of the highway. Loading and firing the gun by himself was extremely difficult, because he had to cross to the other side of the gun to load and then come back to the gunner’s position to fire.

After exhausting his HE and .30-caliber ammunition, he opened the turret and swung the .50 caliber around on the ring mount and opened fire again. He continued firing until all of his .50-caliber ammunition was exhausted, then he grabbed a .45 submachine gun from the fighting compartment and opened fire with this. After using all the ammunition from his Thompson and his pistol, he dropped back in the turret and closed the hatch.

He opened his box of hand grenades and grabbed one. When he heard German infantry climb onto the back of the tank, he pulled the pin, cracked the turret hatch slightly, and threw the grenade. It killed all the Germans on the back of the tank and those around it on the ground. He continued to do this until all of his hand grenades were gone; then he closed the hatch and secured it.

By this time, the German infantry unit apparently decided to bypass the tank. From the vicious rate of fire, they must have assumed they had encountered an entire reinforced roadblock. When our infantry arrived the next day, they found the brave young tanker still alive in his tank. The entire surrounding area was littered with German dead and wounded. This, to me, was one of the most courageous acts of individual heroism in World War II.”
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