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'Day Zero' in Cape Town

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'Day Zero' in Cape Town

Old 1st Feb 2018, 19:28
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TWT
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'Day Zero' in Cape Town

https://www.citylab.com/environment/...y-zero/552113/


The dams are almost dry and severe rationing is about to begin. They're rushing to get desalination plants built. It will get worse before it gets better.

A city of 4 million people with precious little water will present major challenges to all residents.

Cape Town has the most breathtaking views of any city I've visited, I hope the crisis is resolved eventually and that they get a lot of rain when it's next due.
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Old 1st Feb 2018, 19:41
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I'm waiting for the blame game to begin.
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Old 1st Feb 2018, 19:41
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They need a lot of rain, before its next due.
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Old 1st Feb 2018, 19:43
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Originally Posted by meadowrun View Post
I'm waiting for the blame game to begin.
It has begun.

https://www.news24.com/SouthAfrica/water_crisis
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Old 1st Feb 2018, 20:16
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Same as the blame anywhere, snow in Britain, earthquake in California or nuclear reactor anywhere.
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Old 1st Feb 2018, 21:20
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I like the one where two people were bust trying to SMUGGLE water into Cape Town.

How do you smuggle water into a drought ridden city? It reminds me of the rationing period in the UK where the government were burning sugar so as to keep the supply in balance with the official ration.
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Old 1st Feb 2018, 21:21
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People have been warning about the collapse of South Africa's infrastructure for years. So the only real surprise is that this has taken so long.
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Old 1st Feb 2018, 23:50
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When the population of that fairly small area has increased by about a third in the past 15 or so years, one has to ask what increased water supply provisions were built? Drought or no drought, that has to be a very. very important question to ask.
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Old 2nd Feb 2018, 00:32
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Further in the future (but not that far) I can see Australia going the same way.

Meanwhile in Cornwall, in 40 years I have never seen my land so waterlogged. I wish I could flog some of the stuff to Cape Town!
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Old 2nd Feb 2018, 01:14
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If there is spare generation then Reverse Osmosis is a better and quicker solution than desalination plants.Plenty of trailer units can be in operation in days!
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Old 2nd Feb 2018, 01:37
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Originally Posted by oldpax View Post
If there is spare generation then Reverse Osmosis is a better and quicker solution than desalination plants.Plenty of trailer units can be in operation in days!
RO treatment of what? Sewage?
That's a hard package to sell.

Plenty of trailer units can be in operation in days!
That's an over-simplification but Yes. And only if you have them sitting around.

Southern Australia, with similar climate to South Africa is already in a similar situation. Stream inflows in the catchment areas have dropped dramatically over the last 30+ years despite annual rainfall not decreasing by much at all.
Perth population, as an example, has more or less doubled in the same period.
Water restrictions implemented 20+ years ago plus massive investment in desalination and waste water recycling into groundwater aquifers is keeping up with the problem s far, but the future looks rather bleak.
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Old 2nd Feb 2018, 01:45
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In the mean-time unlawful settlements continue to take water without restriction (I am not saying don't have water - but restrictions need to be managed somehow).
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Old 2nd Feb 2018, 02:31
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Desalinization plants and R.O. are expensive, require many to get volumes required for that size of requirement and do require a modicum of rational planning to get up and running.


I understand Rhodesia has lots of water and also a lot of not gainfully unemployed people. They could use a few Rand.
How about a long bucket brigade? The buckets would get lighter the closer they got to Cape Town as all the taxes, fees, theft and spillage are accounted for and then promptly lost.
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Old 2nd Feb 2018, 08:06
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How about an iceberg towed into False Bay?
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Old 2nd Feb 2018, 08:57
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Interesting article in NZ.
Drought is real? but dams and irrigation are not the answer | GREENPEACE New Zealand
In the Sameura dam area of Shikoku (Japan) where they have regular severe drought, farmers have stopped growing water-intensive rice and switched over to wheat.
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Old 2nd Feb 2018, 09:46
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[QUOTE=jolihokistix In the Sameura dam area of Shikoku (Japan) where they have regular severe drought, farmers have stopped growing water-intensive rice and switched over to wheat.[/QUOTE]

Really? Drought in Japan? References please, and not Greenpeace.
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Old 2nd Feb 2018, 09:55
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They used to deliver tankers of fresh drinking water to Gibraltar, I cannot see why the likes of that cannot be done.

Shortages of water between 1949 and 1986 led to the costly temporary expedient of importing water from the United Kingdom, the Netherlands or Morocco. On a few occasions, newly commissioned oil tankers were employed to carry up to 36,000 cubic metres (1,300,000 cu ft) of water at a time, taking advantage of their maiden voyages to the Middle East to carry the water in tanks that had not yet been contaminated with oil products
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Water_...n_in_Gibraltar

In the 90's Northumbria looked at similar going the other way as Gib has a desalination plant now.

whatever happened to

http://www.hyfluxmembranes.com/produ...on-vessel-fdpv



..

Last edited by NutLoose; 2nd Feb 2018 at 10:09.
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Old 2nd Feb 2018, 10:09
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Originally Posted by NutLoose View Post
In the 90's Northumbria looked at similar going the other way as Gib has a desalination plant now.
I find that difficult to believe, as Kielder Water holds 200 billion litres (44 billion gallons) and has underground springs ensuring that it always remains at high levels, regardless of the prevailing climate condition.
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Old 2nd Feb 2018, 10:30
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Yamagata Ken, the only good resources I can find are in Japanese.

This is in rather poor English and gives no real understanding: https://www.jstage.jst.go.jp/article...4/9_4_285/_pdf


Still it is well known that the north of Shikoku relies on the Sameura Dam, but unfortunately the nature of the shale there means that however much rain falls, it tends to drain away, so by early summer each year drought warnings begin to be issued. Some years are more severe than others, but the cities around the north of the island there are well used to having the pressure turned down, and down, and down again as the water level falls.
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Old 2nd Feb 2018, 11:56
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Originally Posted by WingNut60 View Post
RO treatment of what? Sewage?
That's a hard package to sell.



.....
Southern Australia, with similar climate to South Africa is already in a similar situation. Stream inflows in the catchment areas have dropped dramatically over the last 30+ years despite annual rainfall not decreasing by much at all.
Perth population, as an example, has more or less doubled in the same period.
Water restrictions implemented 20+ years ago plus massive investment in desalination and waste water recycling into groundwater aquifers is keeping up with the problem s far, but the future looks rather bleak.
So, if that is true, wouldn’t it be a good idea to stop the population growth, rather than be Lemming like?
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