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Cafe bans young kids

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Cafe bans young kids

Old 31st Aug 2017, 16:49
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Cafe bans young kids

Coffee shop owner defends no children policy - BBC News

I started a new thread, as there's no religion involved in this one :-) These days most coffee shops/cafes seem to be occupied by people on laptops taking advantage of the free wifi and clutches of mums with prams and accompanying kids. Anyone else is in jeopardy of being squeezed outing more ways than one. This cafe owner has a 'theme establishment' whereby antiques are displayed throughout and for sale and is concerned that younger kids <12 will, or perhaps have damaged property whilst mum/dad/carer is enjoying the ambience and has forbade them entry. I can't say that I blame him, as no-one seems to want to be a parent these days, but he'll be slaughtered by mumsnet and social media and then by the outraged who will sue etc etc.
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 17:06
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No problem with this. It's his business and he can admit, or deny who he wants. Obviously he might take a hit by barring kids, but I'm sure he's done his sums.

As for Mumsnet and the professionally offended, so what!
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 17:11
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Is this even important enough to make the BBC News?

- or PPRuNe?
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 17:18
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his cafe in brixham is an Aladdin cave of Cunard Line memorabilia - very valuable and irreplaceable items on display

he is correct to say this is not really the place for most under 12's and anyone with a brain should see that
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 17:38
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Does he exclude mothers with babies?
If not, at what age does a 'child 'become undesirable?
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 17:42
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Is this even important enough to make the BBC News?

- or PPRuNe?
Yup

anything that might turn out controversial among the members here is worth bringing up as long as it's not political
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 17:43
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On checking in at what they thought was a posh hotel, they asked us if we wanted a table in their posh restaurant for dinner. As almost all the weekend was free (flights, hotel, hire car)[#] we reckoned we could afford the dinner (which wasn't free).


So "yes please", we said, and agreed a time. As we were leaving the desk we thought to warn them "oh, and we'll be needing a high chair". They cancelled our restaurant booking and recommended their cheapo caff instead.


[#] Time share sales gimmick.
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 17:49
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Originally Posted by lomapaseo View Post
Yup

anything that might turn out controversial among the members here is worth bringing up as long as it's not political
Is there a hate crime such as being child-ist? If not, someone will shortly call for one!
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 17:51
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I have children and grandchildren. Perhaps because of that, I prefer restaurants that are NOT child friendly!
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 17:52
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the cafe is fabulous if you like old ocean liner stuff - me at aged 9 or 10 would have loved it but i guess a was geeky like that
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 18:07
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There is a significant market for "child free" establishments. Some (and I include ourselves in this category) have nothing at all against kids (we were all kids once) but do like to be able to go somewhere where they won't have to endure screaming, out of control, children.

I doubt we're alone, as it's noticeable that there are increasing numbers of TV adverts for "kid free holiday destinations". I don't see it as discrimination, just a matter of catering to a specific market segment.

A few years ago I booked us in for an anniversary short break in a Tudor spa hotel, that advertised itself as a peaceful retreat from the noise and bustle of everyday life, with country walks and cycle rides accessible from the hotel grounds. There were all the usual spa hotel features, like a pool, various treatments to keep my other half happy, etc, and I booked a room with an Elizabethan four poster. We expected the hotel to live up to it's advertising blurb, but stupidly I didn't think to check some of the hotel review sites.

We arrived to find the car park practically full with high-end tractors (Porsche Cayennes, Range Rovers, etc) which didn't bode well. The reception area was an indication of things to come, with out-of-control children running around everywhere, screaming their heads off. Our evening meal was a nightmare, with very spoilt kids being allowed to just do as they pleased, with zero control by either parents of staff. After breakfast the next morning, where a screaming toddler in a high chair at the table next to us, was given an iPad as a meal tray, with moving graphics, and it's food was piled directly on the screen as an inducement for the child to stop screaming and eat, we checked out and went home for some peace and quiet.

It was interesting to read the reviews of the place on Trip Advisor later, as there were stacks of people complaining that their stay had been similarly blighted by out-of-control children. It seems the place had specialised, perhaps by accident, in being a place for the parents of spoiled kids to stay, but just failed to mention that in their advertising.

If we want a civilised break away from children now, we tend to go down to Burgh Island Hotel(http://www.burghisland.com ). They don't allow children under 12, still insist that guests dress for dinner and don't have TVs in the bedrooms. Pure bliss, I can highly recommend it.
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 18:53
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It's funny the way things go - I lived in France for three years and often ate out. Children were almost always taken with parents BUT they all behaved themselves - even the young ones. If (rarely) they didn't, they were promptly corrected by the parent.
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 18:55
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When my youngest was 3 or 4, we went to a posh hotel for Mother's Day.

The (Italian?) waiter was superb and collared the youngster to help him lay the cutlery on the surrounding tables.
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 19:15
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Once you have had kids from 0-20. You need a break. Good,luck to the new place. If it was near me I'd go
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 19:20
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I have a ten (almost eleven) year old son and an eighteen month old daughter. I have no problem with any business deciding that they wish to be child free. I'll just spend my money elsewhere, no skin off my nose.
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 20:56
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Daughters booked us in to the Ritz for afternoon tea. We all settled down including 2 year old grandson.

Later a gentleman came over and said his heart sank when he saw a toddler coming in and sitting at the next table. He then congratulated mum on his excellent behaviour. A couple of years later aged 5, he had grown out of that phase. I am pleased to say that age 12 he is again well behaved.
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 21:07
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There's an error in the logic. My wife could go in and she's more likely to accidentally smash pots than any kid ...

E.g. earlier this year she made a big thing about buying some new crockery "for best". We've got at least three half sets of other crockery that used to be complete....
She bought the what was probably the second most expensive stuff in the shop. A few weeks ago I was emptying the dishwasher and asked her where five of the six new cereal bowls had gone and why the ones in the cupboard were of a totally different shape.

"Well, they've gone....." came the vague answer.

"Gone where?" asked I. Then I noticed a chunk out of yet another kitchen floor tile.....
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 21:07
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I second the comment about French children , Italian too for that matter . Always seem to be well behaved in restaurants , they don't need the kids menu either .
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 21:25
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I have two (now adult) children and I can clearly remember taking one or either of them out of eating establishments because they'd become wriggly and bored, giving wife, remaining sprog and other diners the chance to enjoy their meal without the pleasure of the accompaniment of a toddler's tantrum. Sometimes, Mrs and I even did car park supervision shifts and took it in turns!

I'm all for this guy's policy. Too many parents nowadays seem to feel that they need to prove their fecundity by allowing their sperm spawn to rampage uncontrolled around any establishment. Our two soon learnt that unless they behaved appropriately, they missed out on the enjoyment of a sociable family treat.
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Old 31st Aug 2017, 21:29
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Originally Posted by VP959 View Post
There is a significant market for "child free" establishments. Some (and I include ourselves in this category) have nothing at all against kids (we were all kids once) but do like to be able to go somewhere where they won't have to endure screaming, out of control, children.
Try a decent Italian restaurant then - our experience wass that if one of our babies started crying a waiter would appear to carry it up and down and entertain it whilst we got on with our meal in peace.
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