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The no brake bike case

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The no brake bike case

Old 31st Aug 2017, 20:13
  #161 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Blacksheep View Post
Given that most MAMILS are using their bicycles solely for exercise purposes - i.e. they are not going anywhere in particular - most of them really are just jogger substitutes
"Putney Bridge" joggers. My point is it's the type of person, not the activity, and certainly not what they're wearing.
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Old 1st Sep 2017, 12:30
  #162 (permalink)  
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Ah, women and cycling ......

https://www.theguardian.com/world/20...icture-caption

How hilarious....for some, no doubt it was, as will be the caption when they read the link.
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Old 1st Sep 2017, 12:37
  #163 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by PrivtPilotRadarTech View Post
"Putney Bridge" joggers. My point is it's the type of person, not the activity, and certainly not what they're wearing.
I tend to agree, but also suspect that there is something psychological, or perhaps physiological, associated with exercise that tends to make some people more aggressive. I've read a bit about the "endorphin rush" that runners (and presumably cyclists) get, and recall a colleague, who was a bit over weight and was advised to take up running. He ended up pretty much addicted to running, lost a great deal of weight and found that if he didn't go for a run he got symptoms a bit like drug withdrawal symptoms.

Could it be that some of the chemical changes induced by sustained exercise cause aggression?

It seems counter to the argument that suggests that exercise is a good way to calm aggression, in people who are so inclined, but may be there are other effects, too.
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Old 1st Sep 2017, 12:53
  #164 (permalink)  
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It seems counter to the argument that suggests that exercise is a good way to calm aggression, in people who are so inclined, but may be there are other effects, too.
About 30 years ago I was at odds with one of my older brothers over a couple of things for a while; any telephone conversation with him would inevitably raise my blood pressure.

A couple of time after slamming the phone down I was totally unable to concentrate on anything else, so jumped on my bike and rode five or ten miles, putting all the pent-up anger in to climbing the hills en route. I didn't allow the aggression to put me in conflict with any other road users or in jeopardy. Felt so much better afterwards, fitter too.

I get angry riding my bike only when the stupidity of other road users puts my life at risk; and so I'll have a go.

Last edited by treadigraph; 1st Sep 2017 at 13:16.
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Old 1st Sep 2017, 13:15
  #165 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by VP959 View Post
I tend to agree, but also suspect that there is something psychological, or perhaps physiological, associated with exercise that tends to make some people more aggressive. I've read a bit about the "endorphin rush" that runners (and presumably cyclists) get, and recall a colleague, who was a bit over weight and was advised to take up running. He ended up pretty much addicted to running, lost a great deal of weight and found that if he didn't go for a run he got symptoms a bit like drug withdrawal symptoms.

Could it be that some of the chemical changes induced by sustained exercise cause aggression?

It seems counter to the argument that suggests that exercise is a good way to calm aggression, in people who are so inclined, but may be there are other effects, too.
I think people are just more inclined to be aggressive these days in general. Not sure you can blame exercise as car drivers can be very aggressive, and they're sat down......
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Old 1st Sep 2017, 13:43
  #166 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by andytug View Post
I think people are just more inclined to be aggressive these days in general. Not sure you can blame exercise as car drivers can be very aggressive, and they're sat down......
There's something weird that goes on when some people get behind the wheel of a car, though, as if being strapped in to a steel box on wheels brings about some sort of personality change.

The type of car makes a difference, too. I found that I turned into a bit of a bully on the road when I owned a big 4 x 4 for a while. As soon as I changed back to a smaller car my attitude to other road users changed for the better. It wasn't something I consciously did, it was a wholly unconscious reaction to driving something big, or perhaps having a higher seating position.

I suspect it's the latter, as I've tended to drive more defensively when I've owned low slung cars, perhaps something to do with feeling more vulnerable being lower down.

Quite why a few runners and cyclists behave so aggressively remains a bit of a mystery. It's a pity we tend to notice this minority and that their behaviour tends to tarnish the reputation of the majority.
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Old 1st Sep 2017, 18:54
  #167 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by andytug View Post
I think people are just more inclined to be aggressive these days in general. Not sure you can blame exercise as car drivers can be very aggressive, and they're sat down......
I agree. Driving is where I encounter the most dangerous, rude, and aggressive behavior. Of course, I'm not cabin crew...
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Old 1st Sep 2017, 19:05
  #168 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by VP959 View Post
The type of car makes a difference, too. I found that I turned into a bit of a bully on the road when I owned a big 4 x 4 for a while. As soon as I changed back to a smaller car my attitude to other road users changed for the better.
Another thing that seems to change one's attitude is driving around in a car with one's name on election posters in the windows - somehow that seems to involve a month of slight more polite driving
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Old 1st Sep 2017, 20:15
  #169 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Krystal n chips View Post
[I]

As probably the least misogynistic poster on here ...
If you say so K&C but I still think that you would get a ticking off from your pal 'Polly' for using such sexist language.

And, feel free to point out spelling or grammar mistakes as you wish. Unlike you I will not take umbrage.
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Old 2nd Sep 2017, 06:17
  #170 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by VP959 View Post
Quite why a few runners and cyclists behave so aggressively remains a bit of a mystery. It's a pity we tend to notice this minority and that their behaviour tends to tarnish the reputation of the majority.
Momentum? Even stop start running and weaving uses a bit more energy, probably why flat running is more popular than cross country.

Fast cycling also has momentum and they want to preserve it. Same to an extent with large cars. Trucks are the best example where they maintain there 56mph come what may.

PS
On reflection, like one of the political parties

Last edited by Pontius Navigator; 2nd Sep 2017 at 06:42.
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Old 2nd Sep 2017, 08:08
  #171 (permalink)  
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Even stop start running and weaving uses a bit more energy
So, if they are doing it for the excercise, they should welcome the opportunity to expend more energy.
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Old 2nd Sep 2017, 08:40
  #172 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Pontius Navigator View Post
Momentum? Even stop start running and weaving uses a bit more energy, probably why flat running is more popular than cross country.

Fast cycling also has momentum and they want to preserve it. Same to an extent with large cars.
A car can however regain momentum with the application of a tiny amount of effort from the right foot. Getting a bike back up to 16mph (or whatever your cruising speed) is much harder work.
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Old 2nd Sep 2017, 08:48
  #173 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Gertrude the Wombat View Post
A car can however regain momentum with the application of a tiny amount of effort from the right foot. Getting a bike back up to 16mph (or whatever your cruising speed) is much harder work.
But we're talking about cyclists - if they find themselves short on energy they just pop a few more pills or top up on the doped blood.

PDR
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Old 2nd Sep 2017, 08:58
  #174 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by PDR1 View Post
But we're talking about cyclists - if they find themselves short on energy they just pop a few more pills or top up on the doped blood.
I've never done either.
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Old 2nd Sep 2017, 08:59
  #175 (permalink)  
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GTW, about cars, you are right, but never the less I think many in larger cars do try to preserve momentum.

Now VP said he unconsciously behaved more aggressively in a large car. This is probably age related as the young males can behave very aggressively in your small 'wannabe hot' hatch.
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Old 2nd Sep 2017, 16:03
  #176 (permalink)  
 
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That might be part of the explanation for many cyclists wobbling dangerously around the middle of the road at junctions rather than stopping and putting their feet down. That and the shoes fixed to the pedals I guess.
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Old 3rd Sep 2017, 14:04
  #177 (permalink)  
 
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Douches gonna douche regardless of whether on foot, driving a car, or biking.
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Old 4th Sep 2017, 09:39
  #178 (permalink)  
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I regularly meet a particular cyclist on the way to work in the mornings, heading into Hatofeld as I am leaving. He is unusual in that he rides a "lying down" bicycle - he has to lie supine with his chin on his chest and his feet up at head height. It looks most uncomfortable. He is the most aggressive cyclist I have ever seen, waving his fists and shouting at passing cars (opposite direction too, not overtaking). I put it down to obsessive behaviour - I mean, if he feels unsafe on his strange machine, why not switch to a normal bicycle?
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Old 4th Sep 2017, 09:44
  #179 (permalink)  
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like this...

lying down bicycle.jpg
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Old 4th Sep 2017, 12:10
  #180 (permalink)  
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BS, lots like that in Lanzarote usually with a flag pole.
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