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When is it time to say goodbye?

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When is it time to say goodbye?

Old 19th Aug 2017, 15:41
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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Loose;

Depression is an evil condition. Good luck.

I prefer to make friends chuckle . . .Good, My father's gravestone reads "Remembered with love and laughter."

Says it all about the man. For me, aspirational.

SND
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Old 19th Aug 2017, 20:38
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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Loose, I've known you on here for a long time - even bought your first book.
I think that as you age there is a tendency to get depressed at times. I have just emerged from a 'mauve' period caused by I know not what. During that short period I just wanted to be as obnoxious as I could - what a nerd?

Get a crayon (or lipstick if you are lucky) and write on the bathroom mirror "**** the lot of 'em", then read it out loud to yourself every morning. Does this do any good? I don't know but it's a good idea innit?

I do like the
"Remembered with love and laughter."
will try to get it on my own stone.
FF
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Old 19th Aug 2017, 21:14
  #23 (permalink)  
 
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As Allan Stewart Konigsberg a/k/a Woody Allen said: "I am not afraid of dying - I just don't want to be there when it happens!"

I read that 5 x 5!

Health, wealth, and happiness, and the time to enjoy them, my friends...

- Ed
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Old 19th Aug 2017, 22:01
  #24 (permalink)  
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funfly, thanks for that. Good story, shame about the book. (sung to the tune of Nice Video, shame about the song.)

I think trying to make serious theological argument in a science fiction story, and then wrap it up as literature - when one had no experience whatsoever - was a teensy bit pretentious. The sequel, which is really half the book, will probably never be written. There's a chapter where the protagonist really lets loose at the closely related Eternal being. He's reached a point where he can no longer watch the suffering, especially of children, on this beleaguered planet of ours. It gets very heavy, but I was full of the logic for the counter argument - the absolute need for non-intervention. But now I have reached a point where I can't find the flimsiest argument for these people to stand by and do nothing. How could any superior being do that? In the real world, that little boy in Barcelona last week - the little face looking into camera. Just one child out of thousands. Just what argument could anyone put forward for non-intervention? I'm losing the last dregs of my belief that it's vital for the development of souls.




I've gifted my body to Addenbrookes but I have to be within 40 miles to get a free ride in. I've suggested to the woman formally known as the Rivetess that she plonk me on a park bench with the acceptance letter tucked in me vest. She told me not to be silly. Just don't know what's happened to her sense of humour these days. Even the suggestion she give a substantial tip to the Iceland delivery man to keep me fresh didn't bring a smile. Heck, they go that way empty every dawn.

I sat here one evening and listened to a pal in NZ tell me about his self-dispatching kit. He was/is, so matter-of-fact about it all. $600 though. Blimey, don't want to part with that much.

Now, back to the stars. I feel another thread on gravity coming on. The most exciting puzzle to ever tease the human mind. That'll distract me for a while.
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Old 20th Aug 2017, 08:37
  #25 (permalink)  
 
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A good friend of mine heralding from from the Netherlands, informed me matter of factly that his mother had died by means of euthenasia a few weeks before. As with many of his countrymen, he has a very direct, sometimes shockingly so manner of being. This time, there was a part resigned, part hurt, part bravado on display. The mother had had breast cancer, recovered and then 3 years later it returned, though well within the manageable means of both patient and hospital. His mother, always a headstrong and forthright personality, simply decided that she had lived enough, had ticked all her boxes and simply didn't desire to go through more chemo/hormones etc, so as is legal under Dutch law made the arrangements, phoned her family to come and say goodbye and the next day discretely slipped away. Perhaps it's an elegant solution, but for me at least it's way too clinical and sudden....
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Old 20th Aug 2017, 09:14
  #26 (permalink)  
 
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Apologies Everyone but we've little time!

Son,36, with 3 little ones was diagnosed with terminal cancer during the week- 3 months!
If anyone has has any specific leads for trials,treatments,research for his prognosis
(Appendiceal Adenocarcinoma Stage 4) please send PM.
Grateful thanks and sorry for the intrusion to the thread.
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Old 20th Aug 2017, 09:29
  #27 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2017
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Way to go

Let Me Die A Youngman's Death - Poem by Roger McGough

Let me die a youngman's death
not a clean and inbetween
the sheets holywater death
not a famous-last-words
peaceful out of breath death

When I'm 73
and in constant good humour
may I be mown down at dawn
by a bright red sports car
on my way home
from an allnight party

Or when I'm 91
with silver hair
and sitting in a barber's chair
may rival gangsters
with hamfisted tommyguns burst in
and give me a short back and insides

Or when I'm 104
and banned from the Cavern
may my mistress
catching me in bed with her daughter
and fearing for her son
cut me up into little pieces
and throw away every piece but one

Let me die a youngman's death
not a free from sin tiptoe in
candle wax and waning death
not a curtains drawn by angels borne
'what a nice way to go' death
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Old 20th Aug 2017, 11:25
  #28 (permalink)  
 
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Loose,
I've written a 'book' containing anecdotes about things that I have encountered during my lifetime and the various people I have met. I travelled for 18 years around Africa and the Middle East in the 70s and have lots of stories.
It is not for publication but I have put it on the web and as I remember yet another daft thing I write another chapter about it. Maybe one day, just before I cast my mortal coil, I will give my kids the reference so they can read it all.
Just got back from a 12 mile bike ride this morning, unfortunately it has to be on an electric assisted bike but really enjoyed it.
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Old 20th Aug 2017, 11:32
  #29 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by funfly View Post
Loose,
I've written a 'book' containing anecdotes about things that I have encountered during my lifetime and the various people I have met. I travelled for 18 years around Africa and the Middle East in the 70s and have lots of stories.
It is not for publication but I have put it on the web and as I remember yet another daft thing I write another chapter about it. Maybe one day, just before I cast my mortal coil, I will give my kids the reference so they can read it all.
Just got back from a 12 mile bike ride this morning, unfortunately it has to be on an electric assisted bike but really enjoyed it.
Which reminds me, does anyone know if the chap that used to write the hilarious stories here about his dog ever got around to publishing the book he was going to write?

Those stories were usually the highlight of visits to this bit of PPRuNe, and lightened my day, in much the same way as the brilliant jokes that Ricardian posts on the "Friday Jokes" thread.
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Old 20th Aug 2017, 11:50
  #30 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by VP959 View Post
Which reminds me, does anyone know if the chap that used to write the hilarious stories here about his dog ever got around to publishing the book he was going to write?

Those stories were usually the highlight of visits to this bit of PPRuNe.
He sadly departed this life by his own hand.
For a while I maintained an 'archive' of the stories and supplied links to those who asked, but several changes of laptop mean that these links are now forgotten.
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Old 20th Aug 2017, 12:24
  #31 (permalink)  
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Boxkite, so sorry to read your devastating news. The survival rate for early diagnosis seems fairly good but I suppose the specialists have explored all the usual possibilities. Certainly, if I read anything, anything that may be a little known trial or research, I'll PM you.
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Old 20th Aug 2017, 12:27
  #32 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by G-CPTN View Post
He sadly departed this life by his own hand.
For a while I maintained an 'archive' of the stories and supplied links to those who asked, but several changes of laptop mean that these links are now forgotten.
I'm sad to hear that. He had a talent for telling a great story, so funny that I'd be sat with tears running down my face with laughter at the antics of him and his dog. It's a great shame that the stories have been lost, too.

IIRC, wasn't the thread called something like "It's a dog's life"? I've searched and can't find it, so am guessing the thread went the same way as it's author.
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Old 20th Aug 2017, 12:45
  #33 (permalink)  
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VP959
As G-C says, the end for that particular sensitive writer was very unfortunate. His skills would I'm sure have developed to professional levels had there been time.

There was more than a little confusion about a certain run of printing - it was either done, or not actually done, or somewhere in between. It was perhaps just on his list of good intentions.


When he reviewed some of my writing, he had perhaps more awareness of the emotional strengths of one particular old lady than any other reviewer/writer's group/tutor. She was rather special, but most folk missed just how special.

The ending of his best friend's life was a tear-jerker. The end of his life was a tragedy - if only I'd known how bad things were I'd have made it over there for sure. His partner found him.


http://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/3785...ml#post5011722
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Old 20th Aug 2017, 13:04
  #34 (permalink)  
 
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We had a street party last night. I was one of the three last to leave, at 02:30, after numerous beer, some wine and other fun liquids.
The youngsters left around midnight.
I was also the one who this morning cleaned up the place and started to tear down the party tent.
Rolling the steel poles down the hill brought out a few bleary eyed "helping hands".
I'm 63 years young and better than the rest.
Per
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Old 20th Aug 2017, 13:22
  #35 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Loose rivets View Post

VP959
As G-C says, the end for that particular sensitive writer was very unfortunate. His skills would I'm sure have developed to professional levels had there been time.

There was more than a little confusion about a certain run of printing - it was either done, or not actually done, or somewhere in between. It was perhaps just on his list of good intentions.


When he reviewed some of my writing, he had perhaps more awareness of the emotional strengths of one particular old lady than any other reviewer/writer's group/tutor. She was rather special, but most folk missed just how special.

The ending of his best friend's life was a tear-jerker. The end of his life was a tragedy - if only I'd known how bad things were I'd have made it over there for sure. His partner found him.


http://www.pprune.org/jet-blast/3785...ml#post5011722

Thanks for the update on what happened, Loose, and thanks very much for the link to the thread. I shall sit an re-read it, although I rather think that it will be a more sombre read knowing the end story.

Thanks also for the member that sent me the pm.
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Old 20th Aug 2017, 21:52
  #36 (permalink)  
 
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I printed all of Foss's threads about Daisy/the Idiot. He had a rare talent. I didn't know what a happened. Such a waste, like many I sent him money for the famous book, the money meant nothing, but Foss made Daisy such a part of so many lives the money didn't matter, the joy he gave me on here was second to none. I Hope when he arrived on the other side Daisy and his parrot were there to greet him. We spoke a couple of times when the publishing thing was going on, I don't believe he wanted to deceive, he forced himself into a tight corner.

God Bless you Foss, and Daisy for making me laugh so much.

SND
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Old 20th Aug 2017, 22:22
  #37 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by Sir Niall Dementia View Post
I Hope when he arrived on the other side Daisy and his parrot were there to greet him.

God Bless you Foss, and Daisy for making me laugh so much.
Rainbow Bridge

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Old 21st Aug 2017, 03:19
  #38 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by G-CPTN View Post
For the rest of you, who, like me are in the twilight zone, what is your attitude for the next 20 years?
Are you working on your bucket list?
I'm still quite a way from 70, but I'm saving up for rejuvenation treatment, and doing my best to ensure I stay as healthy as possible until then. If you can make it to 90, it may not be too late for you, either.

And I'm tempted to get glow-in-the-dark genes inserted at the same time. It'll be great for Halloween.
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Old 21st Aug 2017, 09:51
  #39 (permalink)  
 
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By the time I was 30, I had lost eleven good friends who all died violently in RAF aircraft accidents; by the time I reached 45, eight more had departed thus. There were others that I knew of, but less well. Whenever I reflect on my very fortunate life experiences, I am always saddened and humbled by the thought that those guys never had the opportunity. No doubt others here can share similar feelings. And as I write, I'm aware that from recent conflicts there will be those who will recall even larger numbers.

So I'm thankful for the deck that I was dealt and the rest is, as they say, Que Sera Sera ----
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Old 21st Aug 2017, 10:16
  #40 (permalink)  
 
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Just sparing a thought for our member RedhillPhil who is seeing off his late wife on her final journey today (post #4). I am sure we are all thinking of you Phil.
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