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A Couple of Dog Questions

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A Couple of Dog Questions

Old 30th May 2017, 16:29
  #21 (permalink)  
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On variety, watch how they tackle a Sunday roast. The Yorkshire Pud on top is first to go. If greedy they will swallow it otherwise chuck to one side to get at the meat. Broccoli will be last and one or two things discarded.
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Old 30th May 2017, 17:29
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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Broccoli will be last and one or two things discarded.
Just like me in that respect!
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Old 30th May 2017, 17:56
  #23 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by KenV View Post
My experience is that dogs mostly "live in the moment" and don't concern themselves with change and certainly not the "why" of change.
I'm not sure.


The Bassett hound that I shared a life with in my early teens was tolerant to my young nephew who would ride on her back and hold her ears as handlebars.
Never did she turn on him or anyone else - except if I (or anyone else) entered the room wearing an overcoat and a hat when she would growl loudly and threaten attack - probably due to 'abuse' by her previous owner (we got her from kennels where she had been sent).

We removed a kitchen cupboard and replaced it with her dog-bed, and during the day I could climb in with her without problem.
At some time during the evening she would be let out into the garden for a pee, after which she would retreat to her bed and would have taken my arm off if any attempt to disturb her was made - again probably a throw-back to her previous owner.

In the morning my mother would let her out into the garden for a pee, then she would bound up the stairs to my bedroom, burrow down the bedclothes and end up alongside me with her head on the pillow - yet she never attempted to venture upstairs during the day.

My point is that she didn't just live 'for the moment' as she had a strict routine that she kept to (together with aberrant behaviour).
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Old 30th May 2017, 18:59
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When I flew offshore if we arrived at our destination around mealtimes the galley would serve up a meal for the helicopter crew This would arrive on a nine inch foil container with the meal of the day. The contents would vary through the year depending on the temperature but they were always massive.

Sometimes on a double trip you would eat one meal and take the other home. My dog would demolish it instantaneously. It didn't matter what was in a rig meal, it went!.

From steak and chips to ham salad complete with pickled onions and gherkins, he loved it.

(We had one pilot who would take a spare rig meal home, calculate how much it would cost, bang it in the freezer and dock the estimated amount of his missus's housekeeping.)
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Old 30th May 2017, 20:11
  #25 (permalink)  
 
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An American cartoonist Berkley Breathed summed it up in one of his Outland cartoons called

"The ugly truth about your dog"
"Don't be fooled! Your Pooch is not thinking what you believe!!"

some snippets

When you are thinking
" Good ol' dogs their every thought is dedicated to us!"
He's thinking
"A Moose carcass. That'd be nice to roll around on.

You Say Good Boy
He's thinking
"I've been widdlin behind the hall armoire for nine years."

You say "I love you Wogums."
He's thinking
"I wonder if she'd taste like chicken..."

I remember another which had highlights of a dogs day, one of which was "I get to poop again tomorrow"
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Old 30th May 2017, 23:06
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Old 30th May 2017, 23:26
  #27 (permalink)  
 
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Saluki Zoomies 2 minutes after a high protein meal... instant sugar rush... instant conversion from 40mph couch potato to out and out loony...
Seen this loads of times with mine, now, unfortunately, passed away...

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Old 31st May 2017, 02:48
  #28 (permalink)  
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Please be careful about vigorous exercise for a dog shortly after it has had a meal. Common in larger dogs and dogs with long bodies. I have had, over the years, three Basset hounds with a rotated intestine, it is full of food, has weight, swings around and can go right over, this pinches off the blood at both ends and can be fatal if the dog isn't on the operating table within about forty minutes. Sometimes it can be unwound via the throat but an operation is the most usual way. Once it has happened the vet will often carefully stitch it to the wall or muscle that surrounds it in order to stop it happening again. Very painful for the dog when it happens.
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Old 31st May 2017, 03:14
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Originally Posted by parabellum View Post
Please be careful about vigorous exercise for a dog shortly after it has had a meal. Common in larger dogs and dogs with long bodies. I have had, over the years, three Basset hounds with a rotated intestine, it is full of food, has weight, swings around and can go right over, this pinches off the blood at both ends and can be fatal if the dog isn't on the operating table within about forty minutes. Sometimes it can be unwound via the throat but an operation is the most usual way. Once it has happened the vet will often carefully stitch it to the wall or muscle that surrounds it in order to stop it happening again. Very painful for the dog when it happens.
Gastric Volvulus - it is excruciating and you are correct it needs super ungent treatment to avoid death.
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Old 31st May 2017, 07:56
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G-CPTN, we always have puppies. When we have two there is a definite CoC, top dog often tries to include us in the CoC. Once we sort out that argument things settle down but bed wars are quite normal.

Years ago we had mother and daughter and each had a wooden dog box. First to bed always bagged the smaller box and nothing would move her.

Later, another set, 3 this time, we only had room for two boxes. Dog three had to make do with a rug. One day she commandeered a bread tray.

They are infinitely resourceful. As the generations developed we had 3 in the car, bought a new comfy bed. Top dog instantly claimed it.
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Old 31st May 2017, 08:31
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Our first dog preceded our first born by a year. She was very protective. She would guard the pram when the baby was left outside shops, different world, would kick the door open at night when the baby was crying in the night.

She was also a natural hunter and killer. She would position herself on a walk well down wind of us on a parallel path or run downwind and search methodically into wind. We saw her do a kill once. She captured this rabbit then one neck bite, job done.
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Old 31st May 2017, 09:17
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Our first dog preceded our first born by a year. She was very protective.
They can also get insanely jealous. It is quite possible they will attack if given the opportunity.
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Old 31st May 2017, 15:29
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Originally Posted by rjtjrt View Post
Gastric Volvulus - it is excruciating and you are correct it needs super ungent treatment to avoid death.
We have a couple of Leonbergers, they get fed smaller meals multiple times a day rather than one big one once a day to reduce the risk of this. When we only had one, she would often leave food in the bowl and go back for it later. Now she doesn't, because she knows it won't be there (puppies eat anything they can find).
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Old 1st Jun 2017, 00:28
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Our Sheltie and Cornish cat would sell their souls for freshly roasted chicken. They would position themselves and stand guard in front of the oven once the chicken started to cook, not moving until it was removed.
Carving said chicken was a nightmare, as you had to fend off the cat's paw as she made blind sweeps over the table from below.
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Old 1st Jun 2017, 10:13
  #35 (permalink)  
 
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Please be careful about vigorous exercise for a dog shortly after it has had a meal. Common in larger dogs and dogs with long bodies. I have had, over the years, three Basset hounds with a rotated intestine, it is full of food, has weight, swings around and can go right over, this pinches off the blood at both ends and can be fatal if the dog isn't on the operating table within about forty minutes.
We had this happen to our 8 year old German Shepherd about 6 weeks ago.. In spite of owning GSDs for almost 50 years (she was our 4th) I am ashamed to say I had never heard of this condition in dogs before, and thought it only happened to horses and cattle etc. Before I realised that she wasn't just feeling sick but there was something serious amiss and took her to the emergency vet in the evening it was way too late. Watching what had been a happy healthy dog just a few hours before being put down was absolutely devastating.

We now have a lovely rescue dog (another GSD) and she is settling in nicely, but I still feel guilty that had I been better informed our previous dog may have been saved.
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Old 1st Jun 2017, 10:23
  #36 (permalink)  
 
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Woofie Puppins would wake me from a nap at 17:15 for his dinner, if I failed to serve dog dinner on time at 17:00

Eat half his 1kg of chicken necks and save space until he'd sampled the human cuisine, then finish his dinner...

Lick his chops for ages after eating Roquefort Cheese!

Steal Mersey Valley brand cheese off the coffee table if you gave him the slightest opportunity... He does not do this with any other cheese, I guess he can't help himself...

Knows about sixty distinct words.
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Old 1st Jun 2017, 12:04
  #37 (permalink)  

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Originally Posted by parabellum View Post
Please be careful about vigorous exercise for a dog shortly after it has had a meal. Common in larger dogs and dogs with long bodies. I have had, over the years, three Basset hounds with a rotated intestine, it is full of food, has weight, swings around and can go right over, this pinches off the blood at both ends and can be fatal if the dog isn't on the operating table within about forty minutes. Sometimes it can be unwound via the throat but an operation is the most usual way. Once it has happened the vet will often carefully stitch it to the wall or muscle that surrounds it in order to stop it happening again. Very painful for the dog when it happens.
I've always been very careful about this. I never rush around after a meal and will only ever own short bodied dogs.
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Old 2nd Jun 2017, 07:47
  #38 (permalink)  
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And as with Chef Bruz, dogs do plan ahead.

Our very first dog, maybe 9 months old, when we moved from our quarter en route Scotland (from whence she had come!) we night stopped in an hotel in London as we were going to a wedding.

Quite traumatic for a young dog. We hadn't noticed but she had stashed a dog biscuit in each corner of the bed room.

First thing I took her on a walk. Mrs PN meanwhile took a shower and this flooded the dining room below. On return we found our room stripped, bedding all bundled up and all our stuff gone. The dog meanwhile checked her stash, still safe, and sat in a corner guarding one.

Then another of her dogs, working on the principle of 'if I can't see, I can't be seen' used to hide her head in a cupboard during thunderstorms.

They do plan ahead and they do think ahead too.
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Old 2nd Jun 2017, 11:53
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Dogs have a simple philosophy. If you can't eat it or hump it then wee on it and walk away
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Old 3rd Jun 2017, 02:37
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My good lady purchased an item about the size of a tennis ball with holes at various points. Sold as a keep your dog occupied for hours toy. Idea was you filled the centre of the ball with food and pet would spend hours accessing the grub. Never get between a Beagle and grub. Took him all of ten seconds to figure out that tossing the ball in the air and causing it to spin would dispense said food via centrifugal force. Two or three tosses and job done.
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