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Brexit: The telephone box hampsterwheel

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Brexit: The telephone box hampsterwheel

Old 4th Jan 2017, 10:20
  #6341 (permalink)  
 
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Hat-Trick of Economic Good News to Kick Off 2017 - Guido Fawkes Euro Guido

Despite Brexit!
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Old 4th Jan 2017, 10:22
  #6342 (permalink)  
 
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Despite Brexit?
http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/business-38497998
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Old 4th Jan 2017, 10:37
  #6343 (permalink)  
 
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Oh look at that, despite Brexit B&M sales rose 7% cant be right
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Old 4th Jan 2017, 10:47
  #6344 (permalink)  
 
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Consumer borrowing is rather key in a capitalist society. Brexit won't change that.

I see we have a new word - Brexflation. Last month is was Brexshit. Whatever witty word play can we look forward to?

Next full price sales fell 0.4% in 54 days to 24/12/16. Directory sales INCREASED by 5.4%. It is still expecting profits to be within their target.

I see SKY News are full steam ahead with project doom & gloom. They are blaming Brexit for the failure of Newcastle-New York route. No mention of the high fares, poor reliability of the route nor the 30+ options we have daily between the two cities via 5 hubs. No mention of 10 years of a successful Dubai link. No mention of new EU routes & increased frequencies in EU routes. No mention of Ryanair increases of 20% on one route. No mention of 3 new Polish routes, launched, you guessed it, despite Brexit. No mention of our first direct link to Madrid. No mention of a recently upguaged Düsseldorf (EU) service. No mention of our booming daily ferry link to Amsterdam and e recent surge in visitors here spending money in our shops as the visitors benefit from a great exchange rate. But, let me guess, DFDS are foreign, therefore it doesn't count?

Last edited by HeartyMeatballs; 4th Jan 2017 at 11:43.
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Old 4th Jan 2017, 10:50
  #6345 (permalink)  
 
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Rob - it won't be true. It'll be fancy accounting. Or sumfen like that. Or the classic 'Brexit hasn't happened yet'. Good news in any way, shape or form is strictly prohibited.

It's hilarious how Brexit hasn't happened but it's definitely the cause of Next's woes. Any good news is rubbished as Brexit hasn't happened yet.

Got to love the consistency.

Here we have the institute of directors saying that 6 in 10 are optimistic.

http://www.thetimes.co.uk/article/bu...vote-90qw2bsvz
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Old 4th Jan 2017, 10:52
  #6346 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by ATNotts View Post
Project fear wasn't an exclusively remain effort, unless you have suffered memory loss, you might recall Turkey joining the EU imminently, and don't forget "project fantasy" £350m per week for the NHS!

And yes, I was, and am sceptical of many of the claims made in the remain campaign, to name one, the £4k plus that each family was going to be out of pocket.

We will only see the full consequences of June 23 (good or bad) until after the UK's exit from the EU, certainly not before Art. 50 is triggered
Acknowledging that until Art 50 is triggered the collective 'we' have no idea as to the eventual outcome is certainly a step in the right direction.
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Old 4th Jan 2017, 10:58
  #6347 (permalink)  
 
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It's hilarious how Brexit hasn't happened but it's definitely the cause of Next's woes. Any good news is rubbished as Brexit hasn't happened yet.
Got to love it
Hearty
Because it's fact Brexit hasn't happened all that has happened is the pound crashed on fears that we will come out of the single market no more no less

Because of that drop in the pound we have Brexflation starting
Sadly we import far more than we export so costs to the consumer will rise while the small exporting we do should also rise

All you are doing is promoting the single market and trade with the EU
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Old 4th Jan 2017, 11:04
  #6348 (permalink)  
 
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Errr, how much of Next's items come from the EU? I can't remember the last garment with 'Made in Germany' or 'Made in France' on the label. A good proportion will likely come from places far far away, well out of the single market.
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Old 4th Jan 2017, 11:08
  #6349 (permalink)  
 
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It's hilarious how Brexit hasn't happened but it's definitely the cause of Next's woes. Any good news is rubbished as Brexit hasn't happened yet.
I expected that of course. It's the standard answer to any 'bad' news.

Got to love the consistency.
Indeed. You Brexiters sitting at home on your pensions search the web for good news to post here, leaving out the bad stuff, so you can pat each other on the back.
If I post a link to something that pops up on the BBC, that of course isn't consistent.

Carry on now. I'll be back later after doing some work.
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Old 4th Jan 2017, 11:13
  #6350 (permalink)  
 
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30 years until I retire.

Fixed it for you:
You REMAINERS sitting at home on your pensions search the web for BAD news to post here, leaving out the GOOD stuff, so you can pat each other on the back.

Its a remainiac who posts doom and gloom daily after googling or reading the Guardian online.
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Old 4th Jan 2017, 11:25
  #6351 (permalink)  
 
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I am not sure I can remember a new year without one of the major retailers announcing a profits warning so linking the Next issue to Brexit is about as laughably ridiculous as it gets, pure desperation.
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Old 4th Jan 2017, 11:28
  #6352 (permalink)  
 
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Brexit is a convenient Brexcuse who a whole host of things that would have happened anyway, management failures, failed strategies or even the weather. If I was a business leader I certainly would use it as an excuse to protect my bonus.
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Old 4th Jan 2017, 11:30
  #6353 (permalink)  
 
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Not sure which is the bigger joke, business leaders blaming Brexit on their own failings or Remoaners swallowing that clearly risible idea.
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Old 4th Jan 2017, 12:01
  #6354 (permalink)  
 
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Errr, how much of Next's items come from the EU? I can't remember the last garment with 'Made in Germany' or 'Made in France' on the label. A good proportion will likely come from places far far away, well out of the single market.
Hearty

I used to fly as a FO for someone very close to that company in the fashion Industry. Back then the Material was bought in Turkey, Fashion designed in Italy and put together in the then low pay Chech Republic
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Old 4th Jan 2017, 12:16
  #6355 (permalink)  
 
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Although some are made in Turkey (sometimes by Syrian refugees), China, Cambodia and Bangladesh are the mainstay of British fashion retail suppliers. Not being in the single market will have zero impact. It's been a good while since I saw 'Made in Czech Republic' in any garment I have.

2016 was a disastrous year for Next.
-Adding £100,000,000 in Revenue.
-Adding £39,000,000 in pre tax profit, in line with expectations.
-1,100 jobs created, 600 of which are full time.
-Net increase of 11 new stores & 200,000 m2 of retail space
-Adding half a million new Directory customers.
-Directory sales up 5.4%.
-Plans several new large stores, in addition to new Silverlink flagship store and one in a new 24 store mall opening in Hull, a new mega store in Sunderland and numerous other new stores planned.

I best spend my Next gift card I received for chrismas before Brexit makes them go bust.

It is quick to moan about Brexit and the change of the value of the pound yet when the situation was reversed it failed to pass on exchange rate savings to Irish customers in 2009 and when the pound rises no doubt it will be very slow to pass any savings on. The pound has been strong for years yet I don't recall it being used as an excuse to reduce prices.

Last edited by HeartyMeatballs; 4th Jan 2017 at 12:47.
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Old 4th Jan 2017, 12:33
  #6356 (permalink)  
 
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Because of that drop in the pound we have Brexflation starting
Sadly we import far more than we export so costs to the consumer will rise while the small exporting we do should also rise
If we import far more than we export then the pound is overvalued, so a drop is hardly a disaster.
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Old 4th Jan 2017, 12:41
  #6357 (permalink)  
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Meet the Anglophile who could soon be Trump’s man in Brussels

This week, Dr Ted Malloch faces an Apprentice-style grilling at Trump Towers in New York to see if he will be hired as Donald Trump’s US ambassador to the EU. Like the President-Elect, he is in tune with the peaceful revolution of 2016 and argues that the liberal elite in Europe need to wake up to the new reality. “Davos-man is dead,” he declares. “Read the obituary. It is framed in the US election and all that Trump represents. The post-Berlin Wall globalisation consensus is over. Going around telling the locals that they are racists for opposing migration does not help. They are not racists, they are nationalists – and the reality is that just like homeowners they want to feel and see the benefits of home ownership or being a national. Building the country is now Trump’s political and economic imperative.”

Malloch understands that voters have lost patience with the so-called benefits of globalisation and it is now the turn of European politicians to catch up with that truth. “No longer do we need to have ultimate allegiance paid to corrupt international organisations,” he says, “and think that globalisation or its attendant trade deals will solve all our ills. It has disenfranchised extensive swaths of our populations. Those groups have seen their median incomes fall in the last decade and a half and their costs rise, while disproportionally suffering from under and non-employment. Thanks to blue-collar populism, these working people have now spoken and they have found a voice in Trump. His administration and what it will build is more about hope and change than rage.”

But Malloch will be no populist bull in a Brussels china shop. The former Oxford professor and current member of the Institute of Economic Affairs’ academic advisory council is an experienced diplomat, having served on many international bodies. During the Cold War, he served at an ambassadorial level in Geneva as deputy to the executive secretary of the UN Economic Commission for Europe. He speaks German and French and is a Europhile complete with a Scottish surname and Roosevelt family ties. Immediately after the US election, Malloch was invited to Brussels to address the distinguished EU Montesquieu Forum. “For all the turmoil, turbulence, and sheer reality-show melodrama of the 2016 US presidential campaign,” he told them, “the actual results deepen long-standing trends in the electorate rather than shatter them. You may think the Trump election is a so-called black swan event or as one commentator called it a ‘white lash’. It is not. Rather it is part and parcel of a much larger global pendulum swing towards populism and nationalism after decades of elitist globalism. These trends are perceived as problematic for governance, partisanship and democracy. But in fact they spell a different consequence, one that promises market-based solutions, more inclusive capitalism and greater participation and reassertion of national sovereignty.”

In conclusion, talking to the Brussels elite, he reassured them that it was not all bad news. “Yes, Trump’s success will embolden populist anti-establishment parties across Europe and around the world. Face it: this is the new reality but it is not necessarily injurious to democracy or Montesquieu’s original notions of a commercially based Republic. In fact, it could under the best circumstances and with the right personnel enhance both.”

Throughout the US election, Malloch was very close to Trump and was a key adviser. His insider’s view of the campaign, Hired (WND Books), with an afterword by Nigel Farage, is published this week. This insight makes him the perfect lightning rod for EU politicians to get a real understanding of where the Trump administration is coming from. “Make no mistake, Trump and his ilk are not anti-trade,” he insists, “and most certainly, as entrepreneurs and most importantly builders, firmly believe in market-based fairly played capitalism. They just don’t want or see the results of a long-term system rigged to benefit only the few, the well connected, the super-elites, who game the system or force their one-world globalism on the rest of us.”

There should be no fear either of him going native in the corridors of Brussels and taking a position against the UK. “In the UK, Brexiteers can take heart from the victory of another anti-establishment figure. His political sympathies for Brexit could lead him to prioritise a trade agreement with the UK once the country leaves the EU. It will also ensure a stronger US-UK Special Relationship.”
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Old 4th Jan 2017, 13:01
  #6358 (permalink)  
 
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Britain's food and drinks exports are defying Brexit doom-mongers | Daily Mail Online

Despite Brexit!
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Old 4th Jan 2017, 13:09
  #6359 (permalink)  
 
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Hearty

I flew for this Guy nearly 20 years ago so production points will have changed following the cheapest labour

Orac

From my posts you would imagine I am a remain supporter who would delight in the whole thing collapsing and ending up back in the EU heading for ever closer union

That is the last thing I want and up to the referendum fought the brexit corner
In that time I never once promoted sailing off into the distance but hoped we could place ourselves as close to the EU as possible with access to the single market

The USA do more trade with the EU than we do and don't think Trump will favour us with anything
Having told the EU to capitalise on Brexit he is obviously eyeing up greater trade with that block
I talk of asset stripping already with enactment of art 50 you will see a bleeding of financial service employment out of the UK

People talk of WTO but that itself will take up to five years to sort an dis not the quick fix some here think.
Longer term WTO would work but the damage will be in those five years

We really need a transition period of five years. Will the EU give that ? I don't think so
I think they are way ahead of us
They can regulate what they want and will do so to make our trading hard especially with financial services our life blood

We have companies like Nissan here for unfettered access to the EU what will we do subsidise them to stay and where do you stop.

But please don't think Trump will have that special relationship he will eye up a big market of developing EU countries and that will be his priority
All we can hope for is that the EU has problems between now and then

As for the government? They are running on denial and not facing reality and really need to get their act together because the EU hold all the cards
There has to be a better plan than Brexit means Brexit out means out
Those are the chants of a fool
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Old 4th Jan 2017, 13:29
  #6360 (permalink)  
 
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Germany inflation shock

Not that 1% is much of a shock
Indeed a little inflation oils the wheels of commerce....

Due to a rise in oil prices according to some

Hopefully the U.K. Inflation rate can also reach the heady and healthy heights of more than 1% and reach 2% even.
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