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Tesla and Lithium

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Tesla and Lithium

Old 3rd Jul 2020, 00:11
  #1081 (permalink)  

Controversial, moi?
 
Join Date: Oct 2000
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I agree with all that VP959 says. Tesla software updates are a pain. The last major update I received turned the voice recognition system from brilliant to utterly useless! After much experimentation I can now get the system to recognise my commands 50% of the time if I use an American accent!

Tesla are, as a company, arrogant, disorganised and frustrating. They are clueless at being car dealers despite the individual staff members being attentive and personally helpful, the organisation lets them down.

Tesla showed the world how to build a useable long range electric car. I have had mine 3 years and now covered 46,000 miles. No major faults and I still enjoy driving it. Where Tesla scored over every other manufacturer was that they installed a Europewide rapid charging network purely to charge Teslas. I can charge elsewhere if on a long journey but have never needed to. My realistic range before stopping is around 250 miles (rarely do you drive further and deplete the batteries to less than 10%). Unlike the more modern Model 3 my Model S will gain around 170 miles for 30 minutes charging.

PDR1's experience with a Zoe is lamentable. Just to correct a possible misconception when you consider the energy required to propel, in my case, over 2 tonnes of car the energy required for heating is actually a very small proportion of the overall energy requirement. Only if you insist on driving to the point where energy remaining becomes critical does the car start to turn off ancillaries like heating. What does make a difference is air temperature and in my experience winter consumption is around 20 - 25% greater than the warmer months. Energy for heating, lighting, radio, etc. do not enter my thoughts. Tesla heating and ventilation works as well as any conventionally powered car.

Last edited by M.Mouse; 3rd Jul 2020 at 00:31.
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Old 3rd Jul 2020, 04:58
  #1082 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2006
Location: Auckland, NZ
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Originally Posted by PDR1 View Post
I don't know which generation this car is, but it is about 5 months old.

PDR
Deliveries of the latest generation started in 2020; but I believe that you can still buy the previous gen; so it could be either. The charge port of DC charging varieties has a couple of extra big plugs at the bottom (like the number 8 has been squeezed in the middle) which provide lots of electrons at great pace, rather than having to get AC current and convert it onboard to DC to fill up the batteries.

The Zoe was designed to be a city car, which is why they didn't go to the expense of putting DC charging in; most people driving in and out of the city (or in it only) will rarely charge away from home so battery size and charge rates aren't all that important. This is why we have two EVs, my Tesla, which is used on my commute and longer trips, and my wife's i3, which is a commuting and shopping trolley and has never left Auckland since arriving here on a ship 3 years ago and, even moreso I don't think has been more than 20km from Auckland's CBD!
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Old 3rd Jul 2020, 21:42
  #1083 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Here
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Originally Posted by PDR1 View Post
which is essentially an old-fashioned permanent DC motor but with "synthetic" commutation instead of a commutator and brushes.
Hmmm.

I am not an electrical engineer however I think that from the descriptions I have seen that a brushless DC motor is best described as an old-fashioned AC motor powered by synthetic AC created by some electronics from a DC supply.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brushl...electric_motor
"... are synchronous motors powered by direct current (DC) electricity via an inverter or switching power supply which produces electricity in the form of alternating current (AC) ..."
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Old 4th Jul 2020, 18:02
  #1084 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2015
Location: Farnham, Surrey
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Originally Posted by jimjim1 View Post
Hmmm.

I am not an electrical engineer however I think that from the descriptions I have seen that a brushless DC motor is best described as an old-fashioned AC motor powered by synthetic AC created by some electronics from a DC supply.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brushl...electric_motor
"... are synchronous motors powered by direct current (DC) electricity via an inverter or switching power supply which produces electricity in the form of alternating current (AC) ..."
No, I'm afraid this is not the case - the BLDC is a very different animal to the "old-fashioned AC motor" (whether in synchronous or induction forms). The speed of a synchronous motor is determined by the frequency of the applied AC voltage, and if they lose synchronisation they stop (and melt due to the loss of back EMF to limit the current drawn). They require sinusoidal voltage to operate efficiently, and the power is regulated by either varying the applied voltage (if you need to be efficient) or phase-angle chopping of the voltage (if you don't). The speed of a BLDC motor is determined mainly by the applied voltage and partly by the load. A DC voltage is applied to a set of windings and then switched to another set of windings when the rotor moves through a set angle, as measured by either an angular position sensor or by the back-emf pulse of the pole passing the permanent magnet. The power of the BLDC motor is controlled by chopping the applied DC voltage. This is exactly the same as a conventional DC motor except that the switching of applied voltage between phases is achieved using an electronic controller rather than a rotating mechanical switch. At a detailed level the magnetic circuit designs (and required characteristics) are also necessarily very different.

PDR
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