Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > PPRuNe Social > Jet Blast
Reload this Page >

My Car is Knackered

Jet Blast Topics that don't fit the other forums. Rules of Engagement apply.

My Car is Knackered

Old 3rd Apr 2016, 13:16
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: In the boot of my car!
Posts: 6,000
My Car is Knackered

I met an owner of a 15 year Old Mercedes. He had it from new and the car had driven 270,000 miles.

His eyes lit up as he explained that it drives like a dream and was just about run in.

My car has just hit 80.000 miles and everyone is telling me to change it although its just coming up to five years old?

Is this the car industry marketing where we buy new cars and take massive depreciations for 3 years or is it really knackered at 80,000 miles?

Anything over 12000 miles per year and the salesman looks in horror anything over 50,000 total and its high mileage.

Last question? Doesn't anyone rebuild engines tart up their existing cars nowadays and give their car a new lease of life? Maybe cheaper than the huge depreciation suffered over three year ownership ?
Love my Audi TT RS Plus

Pace
Pace is offline  
Old 3rd Apr 2016, 13:24
  #2 (permalink)  
Paid...Persona Grata
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Between BHX and EMA
Age: 73
Posts: 236
I've just bought an 11 year old motor with 133K miles - to replace my 44 year old beast, only really because I've knackered my shoulders and need power steering. SWMBO is running a 200K miles 9 year old saloon.

So yes, some of us do keep them going, but with a proviso. Chassis parts, engine ancillaries and the odd bit of welding are all readily possible. Engine internals and computer control units are either difficult to get hold of, need unobtainable special tools for dis- and re-mantling, or are so expensive as to make keeping it on the road really difficult.
UniFoxOs is offline  
Old 3rd Apr 2016, 13:33
  #3 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2009
Location: In my head
Posts: 88
My car is 12 years old, and 113k miles. For the past year or two, I have driven low mileage. Never any problems with the engine/battery, which just keeps on running. Some issues with electrics - i.e. alarm, elec windows etc, otherwise fine.

Can I expect it to live for a while longer? It's a 2.4 170 bhp Volvo S80.

I would like to change it, unfortuntely my bank balance says not yet.
Helol is offline  
Old 3rd Apr 2016, 13:38
  #4 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Jan 2001
Location: In the boot of my car!
Posts: 6,000
Modern cars Can be higher mileage but tend not to rust like the classics so theoretically should have a far greater life.

It was no great shakes to get older engines rebuilt but what about the modern ones? Have the manufacturers made it difficult to keep these going so we all change for new every 3 to 5 years ? It doesn't suit the manufacturer for the cars to have a long life

Pace
Pace is offline  
Old 3rd Apr 2016, 13:45
  #5 (permalink)  
Resident insomniac
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: N54 58 34 W02 01 21
Age: 75
Posts: 1,859
Back in the 1960s, it was not unknown (by me) to strip down the engine and have the crankshaft journals reground so that new bearing shells could be fitted - the machining could be done at any one of a number of local small engineering workshops.
I suspect that you would struggle today to achieve such work.
G-CPTN is offline  
Old 3rd Apr 2016, 14:05
  #6 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Norfolk U.K.
Age: 63
Posts: 448
It was no great shakes to get older engines rebuilt but what about the modern ones?
Back in the 1960s, it was not unknown (by me) to strip down the engine and have the crankshaft journals reground so that new bearing shells could be fitted - the machining could be done at any one of a number of local small engineering workshops. I suspect that you would struggle today to achieve such work
A friend has suffered two engine blow ups with his Land Rover Discovery TDV6. The first was covered under warranty, but the second time he ended up with a hefty bill. He was told that LR won't supply any parts for re-builds - you have to have a complete engine. I did some searching at the time, and the TDV6 is apparently based on a Peugeot/Citroen lump. I also found a number of forum posts about rebuilding them, with one from deepest Africa suggesting that main bearing shells from a particular Toyota could be modified to fit...
The Flying Pram is offline  
Old 3rd Apr 2016, 14:19
  #7 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2006
Location: UK
Posts: 4,629
Back in the sixties you would lift the cylinder head off an engine and beside each bore would be the oversize it had been bored to. Oversize pistons to suit and the performance of fitting the rings. There then followed a careful running in period (1,000) miles where the new parts bedded themselves in.

Doesn't happen nowadays. Tolerances are so good that the engine can be assembled almost blindfold and modern lubricants ensure that it will stay that way for tens of, if not hundreds, of thousands of miles.

Modern rust treatments mean that the car is relatively rust free after years of use as opposed to crackling as it came out of the factory.

It's the electronics that kill a car. Some module goes and it costs a bomb to isolate it and then you pay through the nose for a replacement, if available.

After that there's a good chance it wasn't that, anyway.
Fareastdriver is offline  
Old 3rd Apr 2016, 14:52
  #8 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
Location: Southwold
Age: 67
Posts: 58
Originally Posted by Fareastdriver View Post
Back in the sixties you would lift the cylinder head off an engine and beside each bore would be the oversize it had been bored to. Oversize pistons to suit and the performance of fitting the rings. There then followed a careful running in period (1,000) miles where the new parts bedded themselves in.

Doesn't happen nowadays. Tolerances are so good that the engine can be assembled almost blindfold and modern lubricants ensure that it will stay that way for tens of, if not hundreds, of thousands of miles.

Modern rust treatments mean that the car is relatively rust free after years of use as opposed to crackling as it came out of the factory.

It's the electronics that kill a car. Some module goes and it costs a bomb to isolate it and then you pay through the nose for a replacement, if available.

After that there's a good chance it wasn't that, anyway.
I nearly sold my seven year old Merc C220CDi last November but failed to agree on the price. So I have kept it, now 167k on the clock and has averaged 50.6 mpg since January. I'm glad the potential buyer was too tight to meet my asking price of five grand. I would have replaced it with the same again and probably just parted with another five grand to get one two or three years newer. It's the best car I have ever owned and in four years and eighty thousand miles it's only had tyres and oil changes.
Effluent Man is offline  
Old 3rd Apr 2016, 15:18
  #9 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Midlands
Posts: 32
When I first started driving it was unusual to reach 100,000 miles without a re-bore and major rebuild, my first car was regarded as high mileage at 50,000 !

In those days one also avoided the first build of any vehicle and indeed the best cars were always the last of the current series after the introduction of a newer model.

Recently I was chatting with an automobile materials engineer who told me that this logic had now reversed and that the best cars to buy are at the start of production. Apparently as the build goes on the Manufacturers start to downgrade the quality of the components.

He also said that the German manufacturers had finally clicked on the fact that their cars were so well engineered that they go on forever. They have now decided that newer models will have a life of about 100,000 because there is no loyalty or money to be gained from people who are buying beyond the second owner. The emphasis is now to make the car last the typical lifespan of the typical first/second owner.

This is why, I am told that beyond 70,000 major components such as "sealed for life" automatic gearboxes, start to need attention. The conversation also revealed a disconnect between the German gearbox manufacturers view of sealed for life against in my case the Jaguar view, with the German's now speaking of 100,000 between a gearbox fluid and filter change, whereas Jaguar's view was that SFL meant just that and provided the car was maintained by a Jaguar dealer, they have paid for the replacement of a considerable number of gearboxes under this warranty.
Rail Engineer is offline  
Old 3rd Apr 2016, 15:28
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2012
Location: Planet Claire
Posts: 581
My big Audi S8 is 16 years old now and runs like a greyhound. Got 145,000 miles on it now.

Buy a known high quality product, and look after it.

The sealed for life thing is bollocks. Gearboxes, for example, need oil services. Engines need them too.

More frequent oil changes than specified never hurt an engine or a gearbox.
AtomKraft is offline  
Old 3rd Apr 2016, 15:38
  #11 (permalink)  
Resident insomniac
 
Join Date: Aug 2005
Location: N54 58 34 W02 01 21
Age: 75
Posts: 1,859
Originally Posted by Rail Engineer View Post
In those days one also avoided the first build of any vehicle and indeed the best cars were always the last of the current series after the introduction of a newer model.

Recently I was chatting with an automobile materials engineer who told me that this logic had now reversed and that the best cars to buy are at the start of production. Apparently as the build goes on the Manufacturers start to downgrade the quality of the components.
I bought a secondhand (at least) Austin Maxi which was one of the very last ones built.

When I had to service the rear brakes, I discovered that the parts fitted were not those specified as Austin Maxi.

Apparently, BL had struggled to sustain the build schedules and had substituted parts from other models.
G-CPTN is offline  
Old 3rd Apr 2016, 15:54
  #12 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2009
Location: SW England
Age: 72
Posts: 3,756
Got a 2001 Volvo V70 2.4 Estate with an automatic box. Bought it recently with 156k miles on the clock and frankly I think it will last longer than I will! Has a full service history, and unlike many estates it hasn't been mistreated, so cosmetically its more like a 5 year old car than a 15 year old one.

I remember buying a MkIII Cortina around 1974 with 55k on the clock and everyone shaking their heads and saying I was taking a risk with such a high mileage car. Things have definitely changed for the better.
Tankertrashnav is offline  
Old 3rd Apr 2016, 16:16
  #13 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Norfolk U.K.
Age: 63
Posts: 448
The sealed for life thing is bollocks. Gearboxes, for example, need oil services
That's all well and good, however you can't (easily) change the gearbox oil if there is no drain plug fitted! My mothers Vauxhall Agila requires a one time gearbox oil change at 20,000 miles, and to do it you have to remove a steel pan covering the final drive. Easy enough, but I objected to paying 9 for a gasket. Careful removal, cleaning and a smear of Hermetite Red did the job! I suspect that many "sealed for life" boxes only have a filler plug (and possibly not even that).
The Flying Pram is offline  
Old 3rd Apr 2016, 16:23
  #14 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 1999
Location: UK
Posts: 3,336
It is indeed the black boxes that will kill most modern cars. They are not repairable (being 'potted' so components cannot be changed) and can cost far more than the value of the car to replace.
Shaggy Sheep Driver is offline  
Old 3rd Apr 2016, 16:51
  #15 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2010
Location: milton keynes
Posts: 9
2003 Seat Toledo Tdi (VW engine) just clocked up 194K,apart from usual consumables, original. Still runs like new, apart from advisories past five MOT's know issues. Keep thinking about replacing but cant see the point? Did 550 miles last weekend around the North Yorks moors area, didn't miss a beat.
hammy21 is offline  
Old 3rd Apr 2016, 17:01
  #16 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2007
Location: London, New York, Paris, Moscow.
Posts: 3,633
Originally Posted by Shaggy Sheep Driver View Post
It is indeed the black boxes that will kill most modern cars. They are not repairable (being 'potted' so components cannot be changed) and can cost far more than the value of the car to replace.
Automotive ECU Testing - ECU Repair and Exchange

Just used these guys to test, repair and test my audi's ABS controller, lifetime guarantee, using the 'net to research the problem gives a fair degree of confidence this was the way forwards.

https://youtu.be/NxumtQskqTY

glad rag is offline  
Old 3rd Apr 2016, 17:50
  #17 (permalink)  
Paid...Persona Grata
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Between BHX and EMA
Age: 73
Posts: 236
Back in the 1960s, it was not unknown (by me) to strip down the engine and have the crankshaft journals reground so that new bearing shells could be fitted - the machining could be done at any one of a number of local small engineering workshops.
I suspect that you would struggle today to achieve such work.
There's still a few around. I've mostly used them recently for re-facing heads and fitting lead-free valve seats.
UniFoxOs is offline  
Old 3rd Apr 2016, 17:53
  #18 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: UK
Posts: 156
The Flying Pram

"A friend has suffered two engine blow ups with his Land Rover Discovery TDV6. The first was covered under warranty, but the second time he ended up with a hefty bill. He was told that LR won't supply any parts for re-builds - you have to have a complete engine. I did some searching at the time, and the TDV6 is apparently based on a Peugeot/Citroen lump. I also found a number of forum posts about rebuilding them, with one from deepest Africa suggesting that main bearing shells from a particular Toyota could be modified to fit".

I had a similar problem last year, took my Disco 4 to Land Rover Main Dealer, they said they would investigate the problem. After forgetting the car was in their car park for 2 weeks.
When I returned to pick it up, on finding that they hadn't even started on the vehicle, I was a tad annoyed.
They gave me a brand new engine, even though the vehicle was 3 years past the warranty end.
Surprisingly they would not guarantee the work.
So I put it on the market the following day.

I would not buy a Discovery 4 again.
Spunky Monkey is offline  
Old 3rd Apr 2016, 19:59
  #19 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Location: Midlands
Posts: 32
Originally Posted by AtomKraft View Post
...The sealed for life thing is bollocks. Gearboxes, for example, need oil services. Engines need them too.

More frequent oil changes than specified never hurt an engine or a gearbox.
I am sure you are right, however try telling that to the gearbox manufacturers. Their view is that the gearbox has a specified life, in their case 100,000 or 10 years. On that basis the gearboxes are not intended to be opened.
Rail Engineer is offline  
Old 3rd Apr 2016, 20:05
  #20 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: New Zealand
Age: 72
Posts: 508
My 17 year old Australian Ford ute is coming up for 600K and looks and runs like the day I brought it home from the dealer. It does require occasional expenditure which some would say is not really worth the money but I know is much less than the depreciation on a more modern ute.
John Hill is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.