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Admiral Draper's Really Really Boring and Totally Pointless Snippets of Information

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Admiral Draper's Really Really Boring and Totally Pointless Snippets of Information

Old 18th Jul 2016, 18:40
  #1861 (permalink)  
ImageGear
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While wandering around lost in the back streets of Cannes today, I came across this yard at the end of a cul-de-sac. I immediately thought of Mr D. and his penchant for unusual and interesting photo's so here they are:

Attachment 684

Attachment 685

Attachment 683

Attachment 686

Attachment 687

Well it seemed a bit unusual to have the stuff in the back yard

Last edited by ImageGear; 7th Jan 2018 at 12:28.
 
Old 18th Jul 2016, 18:46
  #1862 (permalink)  
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Looks like the end of the line . . .
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Old 18th Jul 2016, 19:02
  #1863 (permalink)  
 
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Barney, the Cemetery Cat, of Guernsey has passed on.

A Quick Up Date On Barney ' The Cemetery Cat' in Guernsey , UK - maison vogue
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Old 18th Jul 2016, 19:34
  #1864 (permalink)  
 
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Remember the "corner shop" in the 1960s?
Yes. like it was yesterday.

I remember always taking a brown paper bag for the shopkeeper to fill with a pound of loose sugar or flour from the Avery scales. I also remember that they always inspected every egg that they sold you, by putting them on a lightbox to check for cracks or fertilised embryos. They also used to plug in and check every lightbulb they sold too.

The shop assistants knew every customer by name and preferences. They even took the time and trouble to read up on a few articles in every newspaper so they could chat to each customer about what was said in the Observer or The Sunday Times or The Daily Telegraph or The Scotsman or whatever, according to that customer's known papers. The proprietor used to do the crosswords for each of the major papers on a barrel-top through the back first thing in the morning, so he could give advice on the trickiest clues.

They don't do any of that in Tesco or Aldi, for some reason.
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Old 18th Jul 2016, 20:02
  #1865 (permalink)  
 
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Most of the corner shops round here have been bought up and converted to flats,there still two within walking distance though, but for how long one asks oneself.
One is a corner shop type of person.
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Old 18th Jul 2016, 20:20
  #1866 (permalink)  
 
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How are those Punjabi lessons coming on, Draperji?
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Old 18th Jul 2016, 20:59
  #1867 (permalink)  
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Mr Draper.
In your considered opinion.
Is the corner-shop owner more precariously positioned. To defend from attacks by the Mark Four shopping trolley Doris brigade?
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Old 18th Jul 2016, 21:12
  #1868 (permalink)  
 
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Up until about 50 years ago very near ( 200 yards ) to where we lived was a Post Office,
a ladies hairdresser, a haberdashery and a corner shop. Each shop was on a corner of the
crossroads. This small shop was owned and operated by a dear old soul called Miss Bliss
but when the owners became too old or were losing too much money they just closed down.
The Post Office was the last to go in the 1980's but that was closed due to a reorganization
by the Royal Mail.
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Old 18th Jul 2016, 21:36
  #1869 (permalink)  
 
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I remember the owner of our corner shop used a pole with a nail at the end to howk down the corn flakes box from the upper shelf.

f
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Old 18th Jul 2016, 22:02
  #1870 (permalink)  
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The town in which I grew up (and went to school) - population 10,000 - had three sub post-offices in addition to a crown post office.
All gone now with only a counter in the (one remaining) struggling department store which has been taken over six times and has had to be bailed-out twice by the council with a rate rebate and a reduced rent (twice) from the property owners.

Within walking distance of my house there were four 'corner shops' (in the days before Asian shopkeepers) - all long gone (at least 50 years).
It seem that the popularity of the private car in the post-War period (and the introduction of the first self-service 'supermarket' - in the above-mentioned department store) ended the need for the 'corner shop'.

My mother didn't shop at the corner shops, preferring instead a weekly walk into town to the grocers (the butcher was just over the road from our house) and milk was delivered. Of course, the grocer would deliver (by bicycle) though we didn't have a telephone, so the order had to be made in the shop.
I don't remember us getting groceries delivered.
My mother didn't have daily access to the family car (this was solely for my father's job as the Man from the Prudential) even though she had held a driving licence since the 1930s (for both motorcycle and cars years before she met my father).
My grandfather was a motoring entrepreneur and my mother worked for him driving taxis before she married.
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Old 19th Jul 2016, 06:03
  #1871 (permalink)  
 
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Sun, sun, sun projected to be with us all of the day but
thunderstorms forecast for during the night. A high of 30C on
the cards.

When I first moved into my village (more like a small town now)
there were 4 butchers, 3 fruit and veg shops, a bakers and sundry
useful shops that sold things that you needed in everyday life.
Now all gone and turned into either living accommodation or
shops selling twee things that are of no earthly use.*
We do however have four Indian restaurants/takeaways,
two Chinese, two fish and chip shops, several pubs and lots of fat
people.

Watering of the flora to be done before it gets too hot.

* I am wrong, I am informed. The twee things are bought by ladies
to give to other ladies on the occasion of birthdays etc.
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Old 19th Jul 2016, 06:15
  #1872 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by ImageGear View Post
While wandering around lost in the back streets of Cannes today, I came across this yard at the end of a cul-de-sac. I immediately thought of Mr D. and his penchant for unusual and interesting photo's so here they are:

Attachment 684

Attachment 685

Attachment 683

Attachment 686

Attachment 687

Well it seemed a bit unusual to have the stuff in the back yard
Here's a photograph of the locomotives & their crew who were part of the gang building Kinder Reservoir in the very early 20th century.

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Old 19th Jul 2016, 06:15
  #1873 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by fleigle View Post
I remember the owner of our corner shop used a pole with a nail at the end to howk down the corn flakes box from the upper shelf.

f
A friends mother had a stall at Doncaster market which was very narrow, but over ten feet high. Tinned goods were stacked to the ceiling and the staff used the same method to topple, then catch them. Health and Safety bods would have a fit these days.
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Old 19th Jul 2016, 07:00
  #1874 (permalink)  
 
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Morning peeps,no need to comment ont weather I think,great set of picks Mr Ricardian,great adventure playground for the local urchins.
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Old 19th Jul 2016, 07:31
  #1875 (permalink)  
 
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Heck, Ricardian, I knew about the railway extension to serve the
Kinder Reservoir construction but didn't realise it was that big an
operation. 6 locos, wow.

A close up of No 6

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Old 19th Jul 2016, 08:00
  #1876 (permalink)  
 
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Are you aware of this site Ricardian ?

NMLHS Home

Lots of archived photos of New Mills.
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Old 19th Jul 2016, 08:21
  #1877 (permalink)  
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Ohhh Time marches on..

My father lived at Ewden Valley in the cottages and worked on the building of the Ewden and Morehall reservoirs at the tender age of 16. Travelling around on the Ewden Valley Railway.

Later he moved to Samuel Fox & Company at Stocksbridge as an Engineer.

Ewden, Stocksbridge, Langsett Railways

In my youth, I also worked at Samuel Fox and travelled in the "Loco's" throughout the Company. When the company went to short time, I ended up laying sleepers and shovelling gravel to make up my "lost" time.

All a long time ago, before I got "the corner office with a panoramic view".

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Old 19th Jul 2016, 08:51
  #1878 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by handsfree View Post
Heck, Ricardian, I knew about the railway extension to serve the
Kinder Reservoir construction but didn't realise it was that big an
operation. 6 locos, wow.

A close up of No 6

I have a copy of a 94 page book "The Kinder Reservoir and Railway" by Derek Brumhead, Jean Rangeley and Ken Rangeley, published 2008 by the New Mills Heritage Centre (Rock Mill Lane, New Mills SK22 3BN). It gives a detailed account of all the locomotives and rolling stock.
Ken Rangeley, who used to run a newsagents shop in Hayfield, appears about 20 seconds in on a Youtube video of a 1968 trip on the Hayfield branch line (closed 1970)
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Old 19th Jul 2016, 08:58
  #1879 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by handsfree View Post
Are you aware of this site Ricardian ?

NMLHS Home

Lots of archived photos of New Mills.
Yes, thanks. I am aware of that site. My grandfather, Herbert Fletcher (died 1961), was a signalman at Hayfield and appears in this photograph on the site, he is second from the right on the very front row.
There's a photograph of the burntout remains of Hayfield signal box on that site - very sad to see.
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Old 19th Jul 2016, 10:25
  #1880 (permalink)  
 
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I did manage to get a trip on the Hayfield Branch before it closed
and had a look around the signal box after the closure. Obviously
before the scrotes set fire to it.

I have spent many a happy time in Hayfield after walking over
Kinder and Bleaklow as a callow youth. Had my first legal pint
of beer there after coming down from a white-out on Kinder.

Edit: I've just watched the Youtube clip you posted. A very sad end for
a line that should never have been closed.

Last edited by handsfree; 19th Jul 2016 at 10:41.
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