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Admiral Draper's Really Really Boring and Totally Pointless Snippets of Information

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Admiral Draper's Really Really Boring and Totally Pointless Snippets of Information

Old 8th Mar 2016, 08:50
  #121 (permalink)  
 
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He's fine, spends most of his time next door with his mum, like all Terriers he's a Mummies Boy,Bro Draper and self are just large puppies to him, well down the pecking oder.
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Old 8th Mar 2016, 10:05
  #122 (permalink)  
 
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This was a bit of the lock wall on me canal that needed removing yesterday.



Four and a half thousand calories later*.



* according to the exercise monitor I was wearing.

One is a bit stiff this morning.
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Old 8th Mar 2016, 10:17
  #123 (permalink)  
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Originally Posted by 4mastacker View Post
One is a bit stiff this morning.
I used to have a bit stiff in the morning
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Old 8th Mar 2016, 10:32
  #124 (permalink)  

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Wonderful picture Ricardian!

I've seen the Lights -- but from a hairyplane over the north Atlantic/Greenland. Somehow I'm not sure that counts.
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Old 8th Mar 2016, 11:13
  #125 (permalink)  

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Beautiful pic Mr. Ricardian. Is that an UFO bottom left?
Likewise Mr. CoffinDodger, I should recognise it but don't. Jedburgh?

Luckily I lost the taste for alcohol a couple of years ago when a mate's pub closed. Bought some good wine for Christmas but couldn't be bothered to open it. Similarly there are about 10 bottles of various malts in the cupboard all unopened. I'd rather have an ice-cold glass of water these days
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Old 8th Mar 2016, 13:46
  #126 (permalink)  

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Being a bit unusual in that regard, I must admit I've never had much of an interest in alcohol. My average consumption of alcoholic drinks in any given year would amount to fewer than half a dozen. I have no idea why this is. When I feel like a drink, I really do enjoy it but rarely feel like having another until months later. I like vodka & tonic, gin and tonic, white wine or a beautiful Matso's cider, the desert lime with wild ginger one. Not all in the same glass of course, and not all at once.
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Old 8th Mar 2016, 14:23
  #127 (permalink)  

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that cider sounds good Bluey Must admit a liking for ginger beer as well
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Old 8th Mar 2016, 15:12
  #128 (permalink)  

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They also do a beautiful mango and desert lime one, Lon. If you can possibly locate them they're well worth a try.
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Old 8th Mar 2016, 16:41
  #129 (permalink)  
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There must be a technical expression for the depth of a wall.
That lock had a lot of bricks going for it.
Heri tige the well known arbiter of conservation; will see that it will be as before.
Water proofed mortar or some such?
Have you had to remove the slots where the stop boards are installed?
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Old 8th Mar 2016, 17:29
  #130 (permalink)  
 
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Didn't they used to line canals wi some kind of waterproof toffee made from sugar?sure I read that somewhere.
Just seemed to have got up and it's dark again,going out shopping tomorrow,need to gerrof me bum.
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Old 8th Mar 2016, 18:06
  #131 (permalink)  
 
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I should recognise it but don't. Jedburgh?
A bit further north than Jedburgh Mr More. One is up in north Tweeddale. 'Tis a pretty little conservation village - West Linton, which sadly is becoming ever more popular and keeps growing as builders greedily snap up available land around the periphery.

That is indeed a splendid picture from Orkney posted by Ricardian. I have only managed to see the aurora twice, once at home here many years ago, and once from near Saxa Vord in Shetland.

Despite reading these threads for over eight years and now having leapt in, I do rather feel such a new boy here.
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Old 8th Mar 2016, 19:30
  #132 (permalink)  
 
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Hmmmm, just downloaded summat to watch tonight,documentary about general Custer and his last thingy,should keep me awake a bit longer.
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Old 8th Mar 2016, 19:45
  #133 (permalink)  

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Thanks Mr. C.D., must have passed that many times in my younger years
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Old 8th Mar 2016, 20:00
  #134 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Capn Notarious View Post
There must be a technical expression for the depth of a wall.
That lock had a lot of bricks going for it.
Heri tige the well known arbiter of conservation; will see that it will be as before.
Water proofed mortar or some such?
Have you had to remove the slots where the stop boards are installed?

I think the term is "rise" although I stand to be corrected. It's a word used by Rennie when he built some locks on the Kennet & Avon canal.

The original builders used lime mortar which retains, apparently, its flexibility. In some places the mortar is still soft like putty, whilst the majority of it is as hard as concrete and makes breaking the walls/cleaning the bricks a balls-aching job. When it's finished, the lock will look like it was when first built but behind the facing bricks will be a modern, concrete block wall.

There are temporary dams above and below the lock which keep the waters at bay and a by-wash has been built to allow the water to flow around the lock. The slots for the stop boards are located in brickwork which needs repairing so they are now in the "dry" part of the lock.

Mr D, the canal is lined with puddled clay which I wouldn't put in me tea. The clay was puddled by driving cattle and sheep back and forth over it.
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Old 8th Mar 2016, 20:08
  #135 (permalink)  
 
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When the idea of building canals for transport became popular .... to be lined to make it waterproof so all the ..... to make the aqueduct waterproof. .... sand, sweepings, soda-spent oxide, sugar, strawboards, sulphate of ammonia, sundries, salt, ...
I rememeber St Fred speaking of some canal aquaduct being made watertight with some kind of gunk made with sugar,not that one would wish to hand out such sweetmeats to the urchins in the street of course,hmmm although I dunno.
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Old 8th Mar 2016, 21:18
  #136 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by 4mastacker View Post
Mr D, the canal is lined with puddled clay which I wouldn't put in me tea. The clay was puddled by driving cattle and sheep back and forth over it.
I was brought up in Hayfield (Peak District) which is close to Kinder Reservoir. When building the reservoir dam they demolished Kinder Print Works to get at the "puddle clay" underneath it, it's still called "The Puddle Fields". There's a very good book on the subject

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Old 8th Mar 2016, 21:51
  #137 (permalink)  
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You're quite right, Mr D, as Fred said: "the Pontcysyllte Aqueduct is near Wrexham in North Wales. It took ten years for Thomas Telford and his workers to build the Pontcysyllte Aqueduct. It was finally opened on 26th November 1805 at a cost of £47,000. When things were built in the Victorian times many people died because the bosses did not worry about safety, but when Pontcysyllte aqueduct was built only one person was killed. Each of the aqueduct’s pillars was made of local stone to a height of 35metres. The mortar used to make the aqueduct was made of lime, water and cows blood! The joints of the iron castings were sealed with a mixture of Welsh flannel and lead, which was dipped in boiling sugar. The bridge part of the aqueduct was made of cast iron and is 3.3metres wide, 1.6metres deep and 1305metres long. It was a great achievement, and is still in use today."
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Old 9th Mar 2016, 02:53
  #138 (permalink)  
 
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Ah yes, the Pontcysyllte Aqueduct - an interesting structure. To go into more detail would be against the spirit of this thread, so I'll say no more.

Other than - how many people can pronounce the name correctly? Obviously, RBG and others who have lingered between Offa's Dyke and the Celtic Sea will have no difficulty, but how about the others? Geordies will have an unfair advantage as the aqueduct and a suburb of Darras Hall share an initial syllable.
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Old 9th Mar 2016, 03:14
  #139 (permalink)  

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I've just encountered what must surely be the most difficult hard-boiled egg I have ever had to deal with in my life! Every now and then you'll get one where the shell has to be picked off in fragments resulting in a somewhat pock-marked appearance but this thing was in a class of its own. It was almost as if the shell, membrane and white were all glued together and couldn't be separated at all. Never seen anything like it! From an alien chook perhaps?
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Old 9th Mar 2016, 04:28
  #140 (permalink)  
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Bluey - when you first crack the shell to peel the egg start at the top where the air bubble is, usually the more 'rounded' end. Crack this end on a hard surface and you should be able to get under the membrane easily, getting under the membrane is the secret!
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