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Donations

Old 8th May 2015, 01:22
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Angel Donations

No, not your money, we don't want that. We want your Blood!
Because I am a rare blood group (AB+), and because of various other things far too medical for me to understand, my PLATELETS are in great demand. These are very important for people who have had chemo, transplants or a big [email protected]#k off accident. One donor of platelets can save the life of 3 Adults, 8 children, 12 babies and untold pre-babies. Unfortunately they have a very short shelf life (1 week), unlike blood which can be frozen until needed(ish). AB+ is known as the selfish blood, we can accept anyone's, but cant give blood to anyone outside AB+. However, AB+ are the most fertile platelet donors. So we give it back.

The main reason for this post is to please encourage you to:
A. Give Blood. Tis the 1st step, they will then determine if you are eligible.
B. If you are eligible or not, giving blood is an amazing thing
C. Every 4 weeks they will like to see you, it don't hurt (bar the needle!)
D. The CAA/FAA etc recommend only 24hrs after donations before flying.
p.s you leave with the same amount of blood as you arrived.....

You will be helping out more people than you can possibly imagine, one day it may be you.....................
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Old 8th May 2015, 06:55
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CathayBrat,

You forgot another WHO limitation (or according to my local blood donation staff) don't spent more than 6 months in the UK which automatically bans you from giving blood outside the UK.

I would feel very bad to lie about where I spent 3 very good years of my life.

Regards,

Rwy in Sight
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Old 8th May 2015, 08:06
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don't spent more than 6 months in the UK which automatically bans you from giving blood outside the UK.
How come? Is it the rest of the World that thinks your blood is suddenly unacceptable or some sort of health issue?

I used to be a regular donor and then got told when I went after returning from work in Brazil that because I had been in a Malaria area I could no longer donate.
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Old 8th May 2015, 09:12
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Banned!

I lived in the UK for 2 years, from 1981 to 1983. To this day I am banned fron donating blood in Australia because of the risk of mad cow disease. I am symptom free (although Mrs Bull may not agree) but the ban remains.
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Old 8th May 2015, 09:15
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unstable load,

Honestly I don't know. Last time I gave without a fuss while ticking the box about spending time abroad (and clearly mentioning the UK) it was back in 2002. After that every time I mention my stay in the UK during the interview with the doctor before giving blood. I was told the refusal was based in WHO directive and it does not take in consideration that I was there in 1994- 1997.

Once an ex who is pediatrician tried to work around the restriction - it worked in an unorthodox way after I almost got in an argument with the doctor - but I don't want to do it again. And a second time for another lady friend (she is a biologist) she managed to find a way far more within the rules (a different way to present the facts) in worked and I am thinking about to try it again. Both times was to help their parents rather than in a voluntary base and I want to see if I can give again blood bank.

Rwy in Sight
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Old 8th May 2015, 10:13
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Mrs. ExXB has a rare blood type too. But she lived in the UK during the suspect period and the Swiss no longer want her blood.

Not as if Switzerland is a mad-cow-disease-free-zone, it isn't.

However until their is a method for screening for mad cow disease in humans, I suppose these restrictions will remain.
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Old 8th May 2015, 10:18
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Originally Posted by Bull at a Gate View Post
I lived in the UK for 2 years, from 1981 to 1983. To this day I am banned fron donating blood in Australia because of the risk of mad cow disease. I am symptom free (although Mrs Bull may not agree) but the ban remains.
Crazy, You would think there would have been an explosion of CJD/ BSE reported by now but I can think of only a couple of reported cases since the media frenzy of the early 90's.
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Old 8th May 2015, 12:48
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Jut had back surgery in the UK and have been told I can never again donate blood. Summat to do with the possibility of contamination when they stuck the metalwork in. Still, I managed 9 units donated and I only passed out twice!


Edit. Make that 7 units (9 minus the 2 refunded during surgery)
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Old 10th May 2015, 16:06
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Same in Canada,

won't take my blood because I'm an expat.

Had to explain this to colleagues at work , when they were trying to organise a blood drive.

told them I couldn't donate

one of them was clued up ( we have a few expat workers) " oh it is because you've lived abroad?" she asked.

MY reply of "No it's because I used to be a prostitute" went down like the proverbial lead balloon.

No sense of humour at times , these Canucks!
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Old 10th May 2015, 16:17
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"No it's because I used to be a prostitute"

Must remember that, and try to think of something better. Currently I end up having to give a detailed description of BSE, which tends to take a while when you work with scientists. The lead zeppelin is preferable right now to losing 10 minutes of my life every time someone asks.
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Old 10th May 2015, 16:21
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I used to be a regular donor and then got told when I went after returning from work in Brazil that because I had been in a Malaria area I could no longer donate.
I too was a regular donor for years, but after giving around 30 units I haven't been able to donate since 1991, when I contracted malaria. Even though it was treated promptly and has never recurred, my blood is too high a risk for donation. I've been told the same applies to organ donation and marrow donation, and that I should no longer carry a donor card.
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Old 10th May 2015, 17:42
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I was regular and enthusiastic donor - until my lung surgery (when I received a transfusion).
I am now banned from giving blood in the UK (even though I wanted to continue and return the favour) - as I might have received contaminated blood in my transfusion!
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Old 10th May 2015, 18:12
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I don't know if I should happy that my country follow WHO recommendations on excluding people from giving blood or unhappy that these guidelines are not going to change any time soon - since they are not national ones maybe imposed by a panicked national officer.

VP959,

I never thought the exclusion applies to organ donation. I have one but I have not raised the issue and it seems I would leave it until is too late.

Rwy in Sight
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Old 10th May 2015, 18:28
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Originally Posted by CathayBrat View Post

The main reason for this post is to please encourage you to:
A. Give Blood. Tis the 1st step, they will then determine if you are eligible.
B. If you are eligible or not, giving blood is an amazing thing
C. Every 4 weeks they will like to see you, it don't hurt (bar the needle!)
D. The CAA/FAA etc recommend only 24hrs after donations before flying.
p.s you leave with the same amount of blood as you arrived.....

You will be helping out more people than you can possibly imagine, one day it may be you.....................
I'm guessing you don't donate in the UK.

Here in the UK, healthy males can donate blood at 3 month intervals; I believe for females it's 4 months.

I was a lapsed donor until a close relative contracted Leukaemia. Seeing the frequent transfusions he received I decided I had an obligation to start giving blood again. I did consider donating platelets, but unlike regular donor clinics you have to travel to specialised centres to donate and there wasn't one anywhere near me.

If you are in a position to donate, whether it be blood or platelets, please do, as often and for as long as you can.
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Old 10th May 2015, 18:37
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VP959,

I never thought the exclusion applies to organ donation. I have one but I have not raised the issue and it seems I would leave it until is too late.

Rwy in Sight
I was given an information sheet when I was released from hospital (in the UK) after being treated for malaria and it had a list of things I needed to make sure I didn't do. On it was not giving blood or marrow, together with not carrying a donor card and making sure my medical records always showed that I'd had malaria. The main problem is that the parasite can lay dormant in the liver for years, apparently.

It always struck me as bit OTT, as I read up a fair bit on malaria (as you do if you've had it) and everything I read said that if you'd had malaria and been treated promptly (as I was) then the risk of getting a relapse was small, and that after a period of time (five years?) there was no significant risk of it ever recurring. In my case it hasn't recurred in the 23 plus years since.
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Old 10th May 2015, 18:51
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Sadly, I had to stop donating blood because I got some tropical lurgy which nearly did for me, and certainly means no-one wants my blood!

CathayBrat - my brother is in the same boat as you. Every other time I call him he's at the hospital, which actually calls him in on occasion!

And whenever there's a thread on giving blood some cretin always puts up a link to The Blood Donor.....

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Old 10th May 2015, 18:53
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Yet another case...

......I had been a regular donor from the age of 16 and like the OP I have relatively rare AB Rh+.

Then out of the blue in 1998 when SWMBO and I pitched up at the session locally there was a new questionnaire. Had we EVER been in a malarial area?

Yes - me in 1968 for 4 months madame in 1948 (50 bloody years before!!).

You are no longer allowed to donate as you might be contaminated with malarial antibodies. And (tear jerker) "you wouldn't want the death of a child on your conscience now would you?"

So what happened about the twice yearly donations I've given since 30 years ago?? Have they killed any children? What about the huge number of donations madame has given since 1963? Have they killed any children??

You're not allowed to donate any more. Next.

Now of course we get the even more tear jerky adverts on TV "Please donate blood it can make such a difference"

(We won't mention the dodgy blood that was brought in from the States which wrecked the lives of many haemophiliacs because it was cheap. Oh no that was perfectly OK).

They do not seem to have heard of risk benefit analysis.

The Ancient Mariner
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Old 11th May 2015, 10:42
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There seems to be some confusion about if you can donate or not if you have ever been outside the UK, (yes I donate in the UK). Having worked in Sub-Saharan Africa for 10 years, I would fall into the malarial area. Being born in the Far East, I would fall into other disease areas. Being an Air Ambulance pilot, I would fall into the infectious disease area.
However, none of the above has prevented me donating. I admit i'm not sure about post surgery refusal.
Here in the UK, healthy males can donate blood at 3 month intervals; I believe for females it's 4 months.
For pure blood, that is true. However in platelet donation they put the blood back in you, so you can donate every 4 weeks.
I did consider donating platelets, but unlike regular donor clinics you have to travel to specialised centres to donate and there wasn't one anywhere near me.
I make the 120 mile trip to Derriford Hospital, its a very nice drive. I feel its worth it.
(We won't mention the dodgy blood that was brought in from the States which wrecked the lives of many haemophiliacs because it was cheap. Oh no that was perfectly OK).
That was an appalling chapter in the story of donations, people should have been prosecuted, but as usual, the blame game went around in circles until most of the victims have died. To use that favorite quote 'lessons have been learnt!'
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Old 11th May 2015, 10:53
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Me neither, tried to but sent 18 - 24 Months in UK early / mid 1990s......you'd think there would be an explosion of it wouldn't you??

The main problem is that the parasite can lay dormant in the liver for years, apparently.

Not in my Liver, I can assure you
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Old 11th May 2015, 13:19
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Latest BMJ paper (2013)
Prevalent abnormal prion protein in human appendixes after bovine spongiform encephalopathy epizootic: large scale survey | The BMJ

Short version:
Estimated 1 in 2 000 UK population are carriers of vCJD-inducing prions
BSE peaked in the UK in 1992. vCJD peaked in 2000 (8 years later). Median age of vCJD victims - 29 years. No victims born after 1989 (when some BSE preventative controls were introduced in the UK).
Total: 229 cases worldwide, 177 cases in the UK, 3 via blood donations from asymptomatic carriers. Approx 5 deaths per year still occurring in 2011.

The paper points out that if this high a proportion of the UK population have blood infectivity, then a higher level of vCJD cases would have been expected. The problem is that the is currently no scalable test for blood infectivity by vCJD prions.

It should be noted that in the UK about 70 people a year die from sporadic CJD, which has various mechanisms including heredity.
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