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Meanwhile .. back in the Good 'ol NK ....

Jet Blast Topics that don't fit the other forums. Rules of Engagement apply.

Meanwhile .. back in the Good 'ol NK ....

Old 15th Oct 2014, 04:55
  #121 (permalink)  
 
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Let's take a guess ....

On the one hand we have a native Korean who was a member of Kim Jong Used-to-be-Il-now-Dead's inner circle, writing from experience. Well, so it seems.

On the other hand we have a non-native of Korea with some slight, passing experience of the place, a demonstrated lack of historical knowledge and an inability to engage in straight debate, preferring as he does Delphic utterances, threats of litigation, moans about being misquoted and or misunderstood, and regular retreats into sulky silence.

Which one is more credible?

Next up: Does a chicken have lips?
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Old 15th Oct 2014, 05:14
  #122 (permalink)  
 
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Interesting comment for one book review..seems the translator had to tell him what to put in his book!

When Jang originally published the book in Korean, it focused almost entirely on his escape, which starts when he obtains a special pass to take him to the Chinese border. Jang had become disillusioned with the North Korean regime, whose brutality became glaringly evident to him during a trip home when he witnessed old friends dying from starvation. The story of his flight through China has its exciting and humorous moments, though some of the reconstructed dialogue is a bit clunky.

In the English version, Jang begins with a longer account of the North Korean regime and his role within it. That seems to have been partly at the suggestion of the translator, who in a preface says that Jang was slow to realise what a treasure trove of secret information he possessed. The revelations about North Korea are indeed what give the book its primary interest. Korean experts, eager for any scrap of information to improve their knowledge of the Hermit Kingdom, will comb the text for clues. Ultimately, it is for future historians to determine how much light Jang sheds.
?Dear Leader?, by Jang Jin-sung - FT.com

Last edited by John Hill; 15th Oct 2014 at 05:24.
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Old 15th Oct 2014, 05:31
  #123 (permalink)  
 
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I think you may find that it's called "editorial input," John, tailoring the content of a book for various audiences. It's probably part of the reason the book is so popular, yes, that it tells about things people want to know about. Wittering on about the Mongolian Bar ... should that produce a best-seller? Umm, probably not, because it's just not something most people are interested in. The reality of North Korea, on the other hand, yes, do tell us more!

I'm sorry that this raises doubts in your mind about the authenticity of the book, since you have no real way of knowing anything about that, or, seemingly, much of anything else.

On the most basic level, editing a text can involve the correction of obvious errors. You might like to start with that, self-editing, John, since it might lead you to a deeper examination of your chosen subject matter here, North Korea. If you want to write about Kim Jong Un, for instance, is he a "Field Marshall" or a "Field Marshal," according to one of his official titles? Only one is correct.

Last edited by chuks; 15th Oct 2014 at 05:57.
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Old 15th Oct 2014, 07:05
  #124 (permalink)  
 
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Can you make banchan from brussels sprouts?
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Old 15th Oct 2014, 10:34
  #125 (permalink)  
 
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It's called having in both ways.

On the one hand, he can claim that there are "curious omissions in the book," but leaving it to others to guess what he actually means.

Then he can climb up on the high sheep and protest "I never said that!"

Likewise, when a book editor asks the author, a non-Westerner, to add details that his audience would want to read, he can then say: "he's adding stuff!"

Somehow this passes for intellectual rigor, in the pastures of a meadowed mind.
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Old 15th Oct 2014, 16:46
  #126 (permalink)  

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Can you make banchan from brussels sprouts?
Good God, I hope not, I would not wish that horror even on the Little Un.


Which brings up a question; can one say the word God in North Korea?

Other than using the word God to refer to Little Un that is.

Inquiring minds want to know.
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Old 15th Oct 2014, 20:19
  #127 (permalink)  
 
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I think spicing up brussel sprouts would take a decent food and make it better. Maybe an enterprising Korean chef can make his name and fame by so doing to the mini cabbage!
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Old 15th Oct 2014, 23:07
  #128 (permalink)  
 
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What a surprise, a refugee writes a book of exactly what the sheep in his new country want to read
I guess in New Zealand the sheep read books...... only real audience there
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Old 15th Oct 2014, 23:15
  #129 (permalink)  

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Maybe an enterprising Korean chef can make his name and fame by so doing to the mini cabbage!
Mini-cabbage and grass, it could work.
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Old 17th Oct 2014, 17:41
  #130 (permalink)  
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Any more sightings of the Elusive Un?
 
Old 21st Oct 2014, 22:39
  #131 (permalink)  
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More news form enchanted land.

NBC news reports that a US flagged aircraft was spotter at the airport in DPRK. Apparently there to pick up Fowle, what was kidnaped while visiting there (only Lord, and maybe JH know why).
 
Old 22nd Oct 2014, 02:26
  #132 (permalink)  
 
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B737 in USAF 89th airlift wing colors.
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Old 22nd Oct 2014, 05:21
  #133 (permalink)  
 
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I hope all the airport facilities were fully operational!
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Old 23rd Oct 2014, 21:23
  #134 (permalink)  

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Well, that's one way of handling it.

AOL.com Article - North Korea bans all foreign tourists over Ebola fears

I'm just worried that this will affect the massively huge, all important tourist industry of North Korea. I mean what will happen to those thousands of luxury resorts on the sun washed beaches and the white sandy beaches, where the waves of Korean Bay and the Sea of Japan lap those pristine shores?

Why if this keeps up, they will become known as the “the hermit nation".
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Old 23rd Oct 2014, 21:28
  #135 (permalink)  
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Oh, and this being aviation site, con-pilot, don't forget the thousands of weekly flights that are now cancelled.
 
Old 23rd Oct 2014, 21:34
  #136 (permalink)  

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Oh, and this being aviation site, con-pilot, don't forget the thousands of weekly flights that are now cancelled.
Oh man, I forgot about that, all those people that will put out of work when all those airlines close down.

If this keeps up much longer, people will be forced to go to those hell holes in the Mediterranean and Caribbean.
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Old 24th Oct 2014, 10:57
  #137 (permalink)  
 
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But, but, but . . . whatever will become of the Mongolian Bar?
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Old 24th Oct 2014, 15:09
  #138 (permalink)  
 
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Mongolian Bar Fantasies

Ah yes! The Mongolian Bar lives on, but without electric lights thanks to power shortages created by Donald Rumsfeld, and without Emmentaler cheese and fine Cognac thanks to the voracious appetite of the stub-foot one back at his palace / jail.

What the Mongolian Bar does have, is fine memories of better times. Oh if only those walls could talk! Imagine the jolly talk and knee-slapping jokes between two minders (always two! we know this now!) and a certain hapless but mysterious frequent visitor.

The deals they discussed at the Mongolian bar could have lifted that poor country out of its misery! And the tales of woeful Yankee repression could have filled the textbooks of starving North Korean children, if they hadn't eaten the pages already.

The plans were fabulous. Fois gras exports from North Korea to France! Lamb imports from New Zealand! High-speed rail lines from Christchurch to Pyongyang and Paris, with overwater bridge and engineering expertise from the Peoples' Collective Steel Works and Soil Factory Number 257!

Only one thing stood in the way of this wonderful progress. No, it wasn't Juche or the Little Fat One and his psycho daddy, or the OGP, or the various Ministers looking over their backs for the next bullet or starving dog.

No, it was Don Rumsfeld, and ABB, and Truman what started the war, and all the other evil Yanquis who are more than happy to do business in the south but somehow like to pick on that one little underdog.

If only there were someone, somewhere, who could carry the true story of the Mongolian Bar to the general public. Somebody to teach those sheeples the real story of DPRK greatness. Somebody whose shoulder chips were so large that even he couldn't see the starving people around him. Oliver Stone, maybe? With the hapless, mysterious hero played by Kim Jung Un, talking to himself?
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Old 24th Oct 2014, 16:06
  #139 (permalink)  
 
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There must be some Emmental up here somewhere...

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Old 24th Oct 2014, 17:15
  #140 (permalink)  
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Sallyann, nice piccie. I suppose the generals with notepads are in the chairs that follow.
 

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