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Books for 8 year old boy

Old 21st Nov 2013, 11:33
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Jack's Granddad
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Books for 8 year old boy

Could I tap into the collective wisdom of this board for a minute?

My grandson Jack is now 8 years old and I'm pleased to say doing well at school. He is an avid reader and has read and enjoyed books like 'Charlotte's Web' and nearly all of Roald Dahl's. His parents are wondering about what books to point him at next and asked for our thoughts. Thinking back to when I was that sort of age in the mid 50's I can vividly remember being entranced by classics such as Treasure Island, Ivanhoe, Water Babies, Coral Island and most of all, Wind In the Willows. We have of course put forward the names of these all time classics but I wondered if anyone might care to recommend their favourites for boys of that age or perhaps slightly older?

Thanks.

DB
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Old 21st Nov 2013, 11:53
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Biggles for a start.
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Old 21st Nov 2013, 11:57
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Sounds like a fair swap. Were the books in good Nick?
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Old 21st Nov 2013, 11:59
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Gerald Durrell's books, like 'My Family and Other Animals' are good fun for all ages.
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Old 21st Nov 2013, 11:59
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Probably not politically correct now but I enjoyed the 'Just William' books, how about 'Winnie the Pooh' or the 'Jungle Book'?
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Old 21st Nov 2013, 12:18
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If he's interested in sailing, Arthur Ransome's "Swallows and Amazons" series are hard to beat...but read them in the right order for maximum enjoyment!

Oliver Twist, Treasure Island, Robinson Crusoe, The Count of Monte Cristo.....

Perhaps it's a bit early for Penthouse, Playboy and the like
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Old 21st Nov 2013, 12:30
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'Wilmshurst Of The Frontier. Force' and 'Beau Geste'. Two of my old Dad's books. Shaped my character, what!
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Old 21st Nov 2013, 12:33
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lighter reading

My son, who is 9, absolutely adores the 'diary of a wimpy kid' books at the moment, plus if it helps, there's two DVDs from the books, (although check the material first to see if it is suitable for your grandson) also, he still loves 'where's wally', not exactly reading classics but still lots of fun
Hope this helps
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Old 21st Nov 2013, 12:41
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At that age he should be about ready for 'The Hobbit'.
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Old 21st Nov 2013, 12:46
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I'm with Skyninja, my kids also love / loved the "Diary of a Wimpy Kid" series.
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Old 21st Nov 2013, 12:50
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SF by Arthur C. Clarke and Isaac Asimov.
He could also try the Sherlock Holmes short stories. While they might be a bit advanced there are several good TV adaptations he could watch before or after reading them.
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Old 21st Nov 2013, 12:58
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Savile, Jimmy.
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Old 21st Nov 2013, 13:19
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At that age my son was immersed in the Guinness Book of Records (as well as many others both factual and fantasy). He was a very early reader. self-reading in his cot and avidly devouring whatever he could get hold of (whereas his older sister merely devoured books with her teeth).

By age 10 he had read the Bible from cover to cover (despite being agnostic - which he still is at age 36) and declared it "a good book" without preconceived knowledge of the expression.

If Jack has any interest in things such as flying or naval vessels there are many authors who have written books such as Biggles or Run Silent Run Deep that are in some ways historical as well being adventurous.

There's also the Famous Five, King Arthur and his knights, Spiderman, Just William and the Hardy Boys.

Lord of the Flies?

Harry Potter . . .

Any good bookshop should have a suitable selection of age-appropriate books and be able to offer advice - if not then try the library and ask the librarian.

Edited to add:- Horrible Histories by Terry Deary.

.
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Old 21st Nov 2013, 13:24
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Don't forget about Jules Verne...
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Old 21st Nov 2013, 13:36
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Agree with G-CPTN, Horrible Histories are a great set of books!
Lord of the Flies may be a bit more towards secondary school age, (only because I remember having to analyse it for my GCSE English for 2 years and was a very dark book)

Its a shame that they don't have those 'Dungeons and Dragons' Adventure books any more, the ones where you get a choice at the end of the page and either 'turn to page...' or roll the dice that tells you what to do next.

You could try and see if they still do them on that amazonian site, both myself and Mr Ninja agree that we could spend hours reading them
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Old 21st Nov 2013, 13:38
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My favorite book around that age was Verne's 20,000 Leagues Under The Sea,must have read it a dozen times,but things have moved on since then, probably wouldn't impress one of today's urchins.

PS Still have it in me bookcase somewhere,a much thumbed and tattered hardback with a faded embossed picture on the front of a vague cigar shape underwater.
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Old 21st Nov 2013, 13:38
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Just about anything by Michael Morpurgo.
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Old 21st Nov 2013, 13:54
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Speaking of Biggles style adventures, for something more modern, what about Clive Cussler? I've only read a couple but they were good fun and seemed fairly G rated wrt sex and swearing.
I'd welcome a second opinion as to whether or not they're suitable.

In the sixties Willard Price wrote a great series of adventure novels about animals. They're a little dated now but still a great read.
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Old 21st Nov 2013, 13:55
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Originally Posted by Worrals in the wilds View Post
SF by Arthur C. Clarke and Isaac Asimov.
I was thinking along similar lines. Classic SF - it works as adventure stories that will grip the imagination, but much of it - certainly Asimov and Clarke - is very intelligently written.

Another possibility is Terry Pratchett. Some of the themes and ideas in his Discworld series can be a bit challenging, but he has also written several books aimed specifically at children.
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