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War in Australia (any Oz Politics): the Original

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War in Australia (any Oz Politics): the Original

Old 21st May 2015, 01:35
  #17341 (permalink)  
 
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Hey Worrals

Is it true the Qld Public Service is moving to "No Ticket No Work"?
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Old 21st May 2015, 03:40
  #17342 (permalink)  
RJM
 
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It certainly is true.

From the Australian today:

The national (ALP) platform contains a staggering 169 references to unions.

These references range from mere statements of support to measures granting the unions constitutional power — such as the requirement that 50 per cent of all delegates to state conferences have to come from affiliated unions.

This level of influence is replicated throughout the party structure.

In the national executive — the party’s chief administrative organisation — 73 per cent of the 26 members are current or former trade union officials.

At a parliamentary level, this influence can be seen in the fact 42 per cent of lower house MPs and a staggering 71 per cent of ALP senators previously have held a paid position in a trade union.

This means that, despite the fact only 12 per cent of Australia’s voting-age population consists of trade union members, 51 per cent of federal ALP parliamentarians are former union officials.
The new Labour government in Queensland has asked public agencies to assist in whatever way they can the further unionisation of their work forces.

Why not? The unions own the Qld ALP government. Because the government is a subsidiary of the union movement, the unions, despite representing only 12% of voters, can order the government to do its bidding.

PS Neither unions nor their massive super funds pay tax and neither Union management nor the management of their multi billion dollar super funds are subject to scrutiny such as private companies are under the Companies Act etc.

That is a hangover from the days when unions were merely workers' representative organisations with only their members' fees for income. They organised education opportunities for their members, looked after widows etc.

Now, unions are huge businesses. They should be subject to scrutiny.

Last edited by RJM; 21st May 2015 at 04:17.
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Old 21st May 2015, 03:52
  #17343 (permalink)  
 
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That's democracy for you.
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Old 21st May 2015, 04:15
  #17344 (permalink)  
RJM
 
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It is, Hempy, but it's a distortion. What's the remedy? Make voters better informed?

As it is, the unions effectively run the government in Queensland. Would Labor voters still vote Labor if they all understood that? If that were the case, then Labor should remove any reference to democracy from their manifesto and be quite clear about it: "We are totalitarians. Labor stands for government by a self-appointed and self-selected union elite which is representative of around 12% of voters."

There's a reason that in the federal parliament 42% of federal lower house ALP MPs are union appointees while 71% of upper house ALP MPs are union appointees. The upper house appointees wouldn't be elected by an electorate, but by being high enough on the ALP Senate ticket for their state, they waltz in regardless.

The coveted upper house seats are usually given to 'good and faithful servants' of the union movement, with all that that implies. If they continue in the Senate to obey every Union directive, they should retire after their 'turn' as millionaires. Not a bad reward for doing exactly as you're told.
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Old 21st May 2015, 04:19
  #17345 (permalink)  
 
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I'm not sure that I agree with you Hempy.

It seems more "Australia's current system of Government" rather than "Democracy" in its purest form.
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Old 21st May 2015, 04:22
  #17346 (permalink)  
RJM
 
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Nice euphemism, Cooda.
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Old 21st May 2015, 04:28
  #17347 (permalink)  
 
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Quick check

Control of the workforce....tick

Control of Education.....tick

Control of Public Information (ABC/SBS)....tick

Control of the Public Service (given it is the most highly unionized industry in the country).....tick

Access to vast funds....tick

Availability of a group of conservatives to occasionally and temporarily take over and get the economy back under control....tick

Buggerit. Why wouldn't you want to be on the inside?
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Old 21st May 2015, 04:37
  #17348 (permalink)  
 
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only 12 per cent of Australia’s voting-age population consists of trade union members
And I wonder what portion of the 12% are coerced members and don't vote ALP.
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Old 21st May 2015, 07:03
  #17349 (permalink)  
 
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Good point megan. I was a member of one union in my working life, and only because it was compulsory, a requirement if I wanted to work for the company employing me. Within 12 months of my joining the union, 'my' union oversaw an integration that saw my seniority slip almost 200 places and then, a few years later, forced me to take my family overseas if I wanted to continue in my career unless I opted to surrender every ounce of self respect to a pack of utter bastards posing as management who worked for a boss who was a thinly disguised Mafiso who had Australia's most popular Prime Minister firmly in his pocket.

Cynical? Moi?
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Old 21st May 2015, 08:32
  #17350 (permalink)  
RJM
 
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I too am a former union member. I worked as a casual chicken cook at the local Kentucky Fried Chicken shop, and I had to join the Shop Assistants Union, now the Shop, Distributive and Allied Employees Association, now Australia's largest, with 240,000 members, mostly young burger flippers and shelf packers who have their $10 per week deducted from their pay and take no role in the Union whatsoever.

The SDA, generally known as the Shoppies, hires and fires the premier of South Australia, for example.

Recently, the SDA concluded a deal with Woolworths: Woolworths agreed to give the SDA exclusive access to their stores to sign up members, and the SDA agreed not to seek a wage rise or improved conditions for workers at Woolworths for two years. 'What's good for the union is good for its members' - I think not.
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Old 21st May 2015, 08:54
  #17351 (permalink)  
 
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The SDA, generally known as the Shoppies, hires and fires the premier of South Australia, for example.
That would be the electorate.

p.s the same union that's fighting to preserve penalty rates? I guess you should hand back all that time and a half you earned, just so you are not a hypocrite.

Oh...wait..
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Old 21st May 2015, 11:05
  #17352 (permalink)  
 
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It was only a matter of time
Tony Abbott rules out resettling Rohingyas in Australia, Indonesia says it is obliged to - ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)
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Old 21st May 2015, 13:32
  #17353 (permalink)  
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So, let's cancel out agreements with the UN. Then let's ignore the green loonies. But under no circumstances can these people be allowed in here. We are full, there is only so much tax payer money to go around.
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Old 22nd May 2015, 00:41
  #17354 (permalink)  
 
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Piers Ackerman stirring the possum with his latest blog entry.

According to Griffith University Associate Professor Halim Rane, attempts at a “non-discriminatory migration policy” backfired by bringing in people whose “values and norms are simply inconsistent with Australian values and norms”.

“So they would obviously find it difficult to integrate into Australian society,” he told ABC radio.

“And they’ve also projected some of their ideas on to Muslims here in Australia.

“And so we are seeing *second- and even third-generation Australian-born Muslims who have adopted ideas that have their origins in the Islamism that developed in the Muslim world in the 1970s and ‘80s and ‘90s.”
OK, so we've stopped the boats. But how many people with views similar to those described above are still coming here legally among the many refugees we are accepting through regular channels? There are tens of thousands of Christians who are under direct threat of persecution if not death under the current madness overtaking the Middle East - but you can be sure that even now, Australia will be studiously ensuring that we take as many if not more refugees who are not Christian so that we are seen to be even-handed.
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Old 22nd May 2015, 00:46
  #17355 (permalink)  
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When Prof Rane said that on ABC radio, it would have had the ABC Huggy fluffs choking on their lattes.
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Old 22nd May 2015, 05:14
  #17356 (permalink)  
RJM
 
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so that we are seen to be even-handed
So that who will see us as even-handed?

Exactly who cares so much about Australia's immigration policies (and whose opinion we care about) that we should compromise our security to appear 'even-handed'?
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Old 23rd May 2015, 06:24
  #17357 (permalink)  
 
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It appears that the socalled poor victims of "genocidal" policys in Burma aren't what they seem. ROFL
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Old 23rd May 2015, 06:29
  #17358 (permalink)  
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Indonesia says that they estimate 30-40 percent are Rohingyas,the rest are just labourers looking for work.I wonder what the truth is.
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Old 23rd May 2015, 06:36
  #17359 (permalink)  
 
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Having spent quite a bit of time in the area, I find it very easy to believe that the majority are just Bangla Dedhi labourers looking for work. The poor bastsrds have probably paid a year's wages to the agents who promised them a job. And whatever happens, they'll have to pay that fee. The family farm has probably been mortgaged to pay the fee up front.
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Old 23rd May 2015, 11:40
  #17360 (permalink)  
 
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now the Shop, Distributive and Allied Employees Association, now Australia's largest, with 240,000 members
Membership figures are a funny thing, and swayed by both the national/state variance (some unions are state organized, others are national, so some are six separate unions while others are one national organization) and the reporting procedures of the relevant union .

Aside from that, size does not always match influence either politically or industrially. Even if the Shoppies do have the mostest members, are they doing the mostest for those members? How active/engaged/represented are those zillion members? (Hint; not a fan of the Shoppies, if you work in a shop and you want representation, IMO talk to the NUW )
This article is a few years old, but still relevant IMO.
Prying beneath the aggregate figures to look at how individual unions have fared since the demise of WorkChoices suggests the answer is yes for some unions, maybe for others, and definitely not for the rest.
Unions are required to disclose their membership numbers annually to the Australian Industrial Registry (now Fair Work Australia).
This reporter used these statutory returns to obtain membership numbers for each of the 30 largest unions in the country for each year from 2005 to 2009. We broke those four years into two different periods: from December 2005 to December 2007 when WorkChoices was in place (see first chart here); and from the end of 2007 to the end of 2009, the first two years of the Rudd government (see second chart here).
The data reveals fascinating differences from union to union.
Union Movement Membership in Decline
WRT compulsory union membership (and I don't doubt any of your stories, IMO such behaviour has caused irreparable harm to the union movement) were any of these occurrences post 2000? Tempus fugit.

Is it true the Qld Public Service is moving to "No Ticket No Work"?
To answer your question with another question (which I realise is annoying), is it true that for the past three years the Qld Public Service has had a "Ticket, No Promotion " policy? Was the overt and overbearing Queensland Police presence at peaceful, permit-obtained political and community cabinet rallies over the past three years (complete with uniformed officers recording participants using cameras and smartphones (and a frigging helicopter on at least one occasion, and yes I waved), apparently 'for their protection and ours' [direct quote] squarely aimed at intimidating public servants and discouraging stakeholders (such as community grant recipients) from attending? The answer to both questions lies somewhere between yes and no.

Did that intimidating behaviour by the government alienate many formerly bi-partisan Queenslanders who had previously hoped for (and maybe even voted for) a change in government, even if they were loosely categorised as Labor supporters? No comment, Officer. Queenslanders have long memories wrt the politicization of the Police Force... sorry, Service . We've seen it before under JBP, and I think the last election result confirmed that we will not see it again. IMO it was a big factor in the Qld LNP snatching defeat from the jaws of victory. Using the Qld Police as a political army may have worked for JBP, but that was a long time ago. Again, tempus fugit; what was acceptable in the eighties (apologies to Calvin Harris) is not necessarily acceptable in 2015.

Word 'round the campfire is that the current Police Commissioner (appointed by the previous government and rampantly partisan) has been encouraged to seek other opportunities now the position is up. Time will tell whether the campfire goss is accurate. As for the Chief Justice...
So, let's cancel out agreements with the UN.
No problem with that.

Last edited by Worrals in the wilds; 23rd May 2015 at 13:08.
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