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[email protected]*^%#* Hi Vis Vests

Old 9th Dec 2011, 22:25
  #61 (permalink)  
 
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Finding myself in a branch of Dunelm Mill (a UK home furnishings company) in Sheffield a few weeks ago, I was somewhat suprised to see a lady member of staff standing on a small stepladder, in order to reach an upper shelf display, wearing a hi-vis vest.. it is a company requirement to don such vest if using a ladder.!. For f***'s sake...! Ironically she was in the lighting department.....
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Old 10th Dec 2011, 01:04
  #62 (permalink)  
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Which raises the point Ginger - if wearing an HVV is good, surely wearing more is better. How long will it be before the H & S nannies proclaim that we will have to wear HVV AND HV pants? Why stop there? How about we walk around with beacons on our head and strobes on our epaulettes? How about little individual TCAS units?
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Old 10th Dec 2011, 05:10
  #63 (permalink)  
 
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kangaroota,
Don't go giving them ideas, now......
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Old 10th Dec 2011, 05:20
  #64 (permalink)  
 
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Don't shoot the messenger mate.

The NHS spends millions/billions on unproven stuff-ask anyone who works in "infection control." I'm just surprised I don't have to wear a high vis vest yet
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Old 10th Dec 2011, 05:38
  #65 (permalink)  
 
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[Goons mate voice]Why? Are you infectious...?[/Goons mate voice]
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Old 10th Dec 2011, 07:28
  #66 (permalink)  
 
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........bus came charging onto the pan from behind us still on sidelights ..........
Slightly off thread I'm afraid, but same logic, why, oh why, do some drivers think that they are making themselves seen in reduced vis. in daylight, due heavy rain, or fog, by glooming along on sidelights only ? The bulk of the vehicle is seen ( hopefully ) looming out of the murk long before the 1watt sidelights are visible.

Parking lights are for parking.

(Actually, if the driver wore a Hi.Vis vest inside the car, you'ld probably see that before the sidelights, too ! )

How many a/c on the ramp are taxiing at line speeds of 50 mph and are equipped with horns
My microlight ( LSA more like ) is equipped with a loud klaxon of the Boy Racer type. The previous owner landed in his own sheep paddock, and had to clear the way with a low pass and lots of noise first !

Use it when giving someone a first flight, with attendant family members looking on somewhat apprehensively, take off, hold it low, swerve slightly towards the onlookers on the aero club balcony, and give a quick Colonel Bogey on the horn ! Such fun.
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Old 10th Dec 2011, 07:43
  #67 (permalink)  
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As an ex graphic designer (don't laugh) I have often wondered if the preponderance of hi-vis items in our world makes some other items (humans) actually LESS visible. I'm thinking of contrast here. You see the hi-vis but fail to see the lo-vis.
Spot on! And now I have to put on my headlights in perfectly good visibility because all the other silly bu66ers have them on and won't see me without them because they expect that everyone has got them on.

Watched a load of blokes renovating a flat on the box last night - painting, plastering, carpentry etc. - all wearing high vis! WHY???

UFO
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Old 10th Dec 2011, 08:46
  #68 (permalink)  

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My microlight ( LSA more like ) is equipped with a loud klaxon of the Boy Racer type.
Brilliant idea for a basic TCAS, eh? If you hear an echo (or a sheep answers), swerve to the right!
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Old 10th Dec 2011, 17:55
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Not answering the initial post, but having recently retired to the Country, we now realise that the village doesn't have street lights.....

Therefore any after dark excursions, we both wear high vis orange jackets (apparently they are MORE visible than yellow!).

No other reason except no footpaths and no lights, so gives us a little more chance of reaching Chez Nous safely. Hopefully drivers will see us, but we also have a chance of assessing whether they have (or not and diving into the hedgerows if needs be).

Nevertheless, it's surprising how many people you (don't) see at night wearing dark clothing, until the very last second. Bike riders seem set on wobbling along, without lights or anything reflective, and seem astounded that you haven't got radar or asdic or summat similar (ESP?).
Yes, there is a certain amount of hilarity is seeing TV reporters etc clad in oodles of safety gear when the most dangerous aspect is this flash photography (dunno why, doesn't look anything special to me). I do sometimes wonder when you see a reporter from a "war" zone (clad in helmet, flak jacket and a hi vis vest screaming XYZ TV - just centre your sights on the T in TV Mr Sniper)) as to how close to any action they really are. I feel that the sound man is ready to pop a paper bag to see their look of sheer panic on their faces.
We don't intend to end up as road kill on the verge.

Time and a place; you should know when hi vis is appropriate and when it is not.

(Steps down from soapbox, exits stage left)
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Old 10th Dec 2011, 17:59
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Denmark (in the 1980s) popularised reflectors (plastic discs) that were worn pinned to clothing by children and adults when cycling or walking.
They 'spun' on a string, so passing cars would illuminate them and they would flash - extremely effective.
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Old 10th Dec 2011, 19:04
  #71 (permalink)  
 
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Few things funnier than seeing an asphalt gang in hard hats. They may offer some protection to shorta***s though. For someone 6'2" they enable you to strike your head on an obstruction you would have cleared without the hat while at the same time the peak conceals the obstruction.

After an excellent landing etc...
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Old 10th Dec 2011, 22:30
  #72 (permalink)  
 
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Remember vividly the "banter" between the gr's and F3's at Sola during an EX. F3 were "poofs" for having the hi vis whilst the "go anywhere" gr were all cammed up proper.

Until a sad event that left, I think 1 dead. Next night the spanking bright Hi vis on the GR line was VERY apparent.......
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Old 11th Dec 2011, 00:47
  #73 (permalink)  
 
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Firstly, what is needed is a bunch of keys hanging off - with one of those chains - the carrier`s belt. A shirt with epaulettes, and then - the preferred albeit unafordable for most - the icon of the deranged, the bomber jacket in luminous yellow.

" what ? you`ve just been run over ?"

That`s yer problem mate, the driver is colour blind.


ps, almost 30 years ago a watering hole in australia had a sign on the door No shoes, no shirt, no service.

A building site near me now has No hat , no vest, no job.
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Old 11th Dec 2011, 09:05
  #74 (permalink)  
 
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As a bloke who sits at the front end of a large multi engine helicopter, I HATE the f$$*ing things. They have to be the most dangerous things man has made. Before climbing into the cockpit with engines and blades turning, the crews remove the HVV then stuff them in the door trim, the chance of the HVV then blowing out at going threw the engine/main rotor/tail rotor is VERY high. I go nuts at anyone who removes them close to the a/c and complain at every chance to have them taken away from crews

Rant over

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Old 11th Dec 2011, 09:26
  #75 (permalink)  
 
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A large multi - engined chopper.

Just a shot in the dark mate, could it be two engines ?

Trust me on this, the very last thing you would want would be reflections bouncing back from the windows.
But l do understand your concern.
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Old 11th Dec 2011, 09:36
  #76 (permalink)  
 
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I think hi-viz jackets are an example of the danger of playing the safety card. I saw it all the time at BA. If someone wanted a mod done to the aircraft or to some SOP, especially if they knew it was a weak business case, would usually make an unjustified claim that it would improve safety, in every case with no evidence to back up that claim. Essentially it came down to "safe is what I think it is", which is nonsense.

Another case in point. I've taken drivers' license tests in both UK and US. In the US, we're taught to cross our hands over the top of the wheel when making a turn. They discourage passing the wheel hand-to-hand. In the UK, you can fail your test if you use the cross-over method. Both claim it's because their way is safer. Since they are in direct opposition, one of them must be wrong. But at some point some person's opinion somehow became fact and is now enshrined in SOP. With nothing more conclusive than "because I think so" to back it up.

Hi-viz vests in most modern applications fall into this category, I think. And that's the annoyance of them; that they create yet another petty requirement and lots of hassle but no one, anywhere, seems to be able to make a genuine safety case in most situations.
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Old 11th Dec 2011, 10:24
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Another case in point. I've taken drivers' license tests in both UK and US. In the US, we're taught to cross our hands over the top of the wheel when making a turn. They discourage passing the wheel hand-to-hand. In the UK, you can fail your test if you use the cross-over method. Both claim it's because their way is safer. Since they are in direct opposition, one of them must be wrong. But at some point some person's opinion somehow became fact and is now enshrined in SOP. With nothing more conclusive than "because I think so" to back it up.

Acksherly, it has been known for people to lose control of a vehicle whilst they "untie" their arms in the middle of a turn and that is why is is discouraged. Mind you, I was told that, in the US, you are now taught to hold the BOTTOM of the steering wheel whilst driving so the airbag doesn't break your thumbs when it deploys. That, of course, brings in other issues like:-

1. Why are the airbags such a risk in the first case
2. Why are y'all not being taught to drive in such a way to prevent you being in the sort of incident where the airbag would deploy in the first case?
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Old 11th Dec 2011, 10:36
  #78 (permalink)  

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Means snot. Most drivers have head down texting. On ramp! Standards have declined in line with poor hiring habits.
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Old 11th Dec 2011, 10:42
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From what I remember, standards of ramp drivers weren't high in the first case. They were bloody lunatics at LHR.
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Old 11th Dec 2011, 10:58
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Originally Posted by Pitts2112
Another case in point. I've taken drivers' license tests in both UK and US. In the US, we're taught to cross our hands over the top of the wheel when making a turn. They discourage passing the wheel hand-to-hand. In the UK, you can fail your test if you use the cross-over method. Both claim it's because their way is safer.
This US site explains that both methods may be used, depending on conditions, but says:
While this method is popular, it isnít as safe as the hand-to-hand method. In fact, some countries have outlawed hand-over-hand steering. It also exposes you to additional risk of injury to arms, hands, and face if the airbag deploys.
Stage 1: Steering Methods | Driver's Ed Guru

This UK site specifies the hand to hand method:
Steering a car

Seems the hand to hand wins on safety in both countries - it's just the US
  1. aren't anal about it, and
  2. recognise it's useful for slow manoeuvring (such as parking)
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