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EU Politics - Hamsterwheel

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EU Politics - Hamsterwheel

Old 12th Nov 2014, 19:53
  #3561 (permalink)  
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Soon they'll be building a wall round the place to keep the people in.

I can just see it.

Step 1: The President insists the wall will be built
Step 2: The President says there will be special rates of pay for the wall-builders, lower than normal brick layers wages "and nothing will deter me from implementing this". And "there will be no taxes on their pay (but their will be 'charges' ")
Step 3: Wall-builders go on strike
Step 4: President cancels special rates of pay and extra charges.
Step 5: France goes bust.
Step 6: Wall is never built
Step 7: KAG informs JetBlast that French brick-layers are second to none.
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Old 13th Nov 2014, 10:04
  #3562 (permalink)  
 
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It might rid the UK of some of the criminal scum and filth who have infiltrated the place over the years.
... Mmmmm...!! Said by someone from...??!!

Being the liberal that I am (small 'l'), I feel that there are much better ways of dealing with baddies that 'infiltrate the place' than inflict the illiberal concept of compulsory ID documents on the innocent population. On this occasion I will agree with 'Gertrude', leave that to the French!
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Old 13th Nov 2014, 10:18
  #3563 (permalink)  
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Coming from a country which doesn't have any form of ID requirement, but having always lived in a country that did - until I moved to Spain where ID cards for non-working EU residents were ruled discriminatory by Brussels so we don't have 'em - I know which I prefer.

No problem for me carrying a card, indeed it marks me out as not being one of the criminal scum and filth who have infiltrated the place over the years. But...no way am I entitled to an ID card in Spain !
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Old 13th Nov 2014, 17:27
  #3564 (permalink)  
 
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.. Mmmmm...!! Said by someone from...??!!
What exactly are you implying there, Trossie?

Come on, be a man, spell it out.
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Old 13th Nov 2014, 17:34
  #3565 (permalink)  
 
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Sir John Major tells Germans: Britain has a 50-50 chance of quitting EU - Telegraph
Britain has just a 50-50 chance of remaining in the European Union, Sir John Major has warned, saying that opposition to continued membership of the European Union has reached “a critical mass”.

In a speech in Berlin on Thursday Sir John warned that Britain’s frustration was “no game”, adding: “There is a very real risk of separation that could damage the future of the United Kingdom – and Europe as a whole.”

Sir John - who was a pro-European during his time as Prime Minister from 1990 and 1997 - also said that it was time officials in the European Union recognised real concern in the UK about immigration.

He said: “Our small island simply cannot absorb the present and projected numbers at the current speed: it is not physically or politically possible without huge public disquiet.”

Sir John’s speech – “Britain and the EU: In or Out” – is the most significant speech on Europe by the former Tory Prime Minister for two decades.
Even a former PM who was pro-EU has now spoken out against the iniquity of the organisation and what it imposes on member states.
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Old 14th Nov 2014, 07:02
  #3566 (permalink)  
 
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What exactly are you implying there, Trossie?

Come on, be a man, spell it out.
I think that the 'user name' gives a clue of someone being from 'elsewhere'!! (The last I looked, Cape Town was not in the UK!)

But let's look at the usefulness of ID cards: Cape Town has been under a regime requiring ID documents going back further than (probably) anyone posting on here can remember, but that hasn't kept out "...the criminal scum and filth who have infiltrated the place over the years." And look at how they have infiltrated that place!

Compulsory ID documents are so alien to British life that they should never be considered again. If other countries in the EU want them, then that says a lot about those countries. They are nothing more than another target for fraudsters for forgery and corruption.
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Old 14th Nov 2014, 08:02
  #3567 (permalink)  
 
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It might rid the UK of some of the criminal scum and filth who have infiltrated the place over the years. ...

Mmmmm...!! Said by someone from...??!!
Your comment was a clear implication that I might form part of the criminal scum and filth ..... and that implication is one you have no right nor grounds to make.

As far as ZA is concerned, yes, it has been infiltrated by criminals from all over Africa (the largest and worst contingent being NG) and that is because of an inept and corrupt regime which does not police the borders or entry points adequately (sounds familiar?)

As for your 'clue' of being from somewhere, how very smart and astute of you to make that observation. Since you don't know where I'm from, nor where I live, it might be better not to make assumptions, one of which is the automatic assumption from my username that I am responsible for the shit that goes on in ZA.
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Old 14th Nov 2014, 11:16
  #3568 (permalink)  
 
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Your comment was a clear implication that I might form part of the criminal scum and filth
Not at all dear boy!! Just a comment that as someone with a 'user name' that clearly indicates not being from the UK, comments on matters in the UK are comments from an outsider! (And I know how touchy some places, like SA, are so touchy about 'outsiders' passing comments on their affairs!!)

I would not for a second ever think that simply because someone is from somewhere (like SA) one is in any way responsible for what goes on there. (And SA is probably one of the best examples of how so many people, for a long time, can not have been seen as 'responsible' for what a bunch of crooks in power are up to!) Just pointing out that in circumstances that you should know so well, compulsory ID documents has had nowt to do with the outcomes, so no reason for it to work in the UK! Leave things like that to the French!
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Old 15th Nov 2014, 16:03
  #3569 (permalink)  
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There soon won’t be a Europe to be part of.

By Jeremy Warner6:20AM GMT 14 Nov

Forget the arrest warrant row, free movement of labour, budget surcharges and all the other invasions that come with membership of the European Union. There is a much bigger menace hovering above what my colleague Peter Oborne has called the “dreary parochialism” of the British debate on Europe than erosion of national sovereignty.

Set against Europe’s abject failure to solve its economic problems – now fast transmogrifying into a degree of political instability not seen since the Second World War – Britain’s obsession with the relative merits of being in or out seems not just parochial, but almost wholly irrelevant.

Economically and politically, Europe is sinking fast, and it seems powerless to save itself. Our island nation cannot indefinitely escape these destructive dynamics. At this week’s CBI annual conference, there was much talk of the damage that uncertainty over British membership of the EU was doing to business confidence.

Really? There is absolutely no evidence of it in the data, which continue to point to above trend UK growth in both business and inward investment. It is not Britain’s quarrels with Brussels that are the real danger to business, but Europe’s growing economic and political malaise.

Indeed, the way things are going, there soon won’t be a Europe to be part of. The greater threat to our future is not loss of European markets and investment, but a continent paralysed by political crisis and economically crippled by malfunctioning monetary union. Europe pretends to be a single nation, but is incapable of acting like one.

That this tragedy is in part caused by the enforced march to federalism is beside the point. Whatever the reasons, Europe is burning up again, and, historically, it’s always been impossible for Britain to escape Europe’s flames.

Curiously, it is to American officials – who are not even part of the European Union – that we must turn to find these frustrations best articulated. In recalling Europe’s impotence in the face of gathering financial crisis, Tim Geithner, the former US treasury secretary, was this week quoted as saying: “I completely underweighted the possibility they would flail around for three years. It was just inconceivable to me they would let it get as bad as they ultimately did.”

These sentiments find their mirror image in what Mr Geithner’s successor, Jack Lew, had to say to the World Affairs Council in Seattle on Wednesday. Pointing the finger squarely at Europe, Mr Lew said that the global economy could not prosper by relying on the United States to be the importer of first and last resort, nor could it count on the US growing fast enough to make up for weak growth elsewhere.

Britain finds itself in the same boat. In order to compensate for economic failure in Europe, the UK is forced to pursue reflationary policies that in the long term it can ill afford. What is already one of Europe’s most unbalanced economies is being compelled by Europe’s tragic series of wrong turns into becoming even more dependent on pumped up domestic demand.

We see the consequences of this in what is likely to be the largest budget deficit in Europe this year, an again virtually non-existent household savings rate, and an excess of imported tradable goods over exports running at a record £10 billion a month.

With an election looming, Government ministers like to boast of Britain’s superior economic performance, yet the reality is one of increasingly unsustainable policy in a desperate counter to Europe’s contractionary madness. Britain has again joined America as Europe’s consumer of last resort.

It is an economic truth pretty much universally acknowledged that you cannot deflate your way out of a debt trap, yet it seems entirely lost on the eurozone high command.

As ye sow, ye shall reap. Across the continent, traditional centrist politics are in a state of meltdown. Nowhere is this more apparent than in Spain, where a radical Left party that didn’t even exist 10 months ago is now topping the polls. Ill-judged attempts by the Rajoy government to use the crisis as a means of strengthening Madrid’s grip on the country have meanwhile reignited Spain’s centuries old centrifugal forces. It’s not just the Catalans who threaten to break away.

What goes for Spain is just a proxy for Europe as a whole, where attempts to impose fiscal discipline from the centre have resulted only in growing public alienation and anger. In France, the polls are led by an anti-European crypto-fascist with a Left-wing agenda that makes even the disastrous François Hollande look moderate.

In Italy, the only viable alternative to the beleaguered Matteo Renzi is a professional comedian, Beppe Grillo, with no apparent policies at all, or few that make any sense. Even in Germany, the protest vote is fast gaining momentum. As with Ukip, Alternativ für Deutschland has taken off like a rocket since it widened its appeal from the single purpose of bringing back the beloved Deutschmark to an anti-immigrant, law and order, agenda.

The European Union is failing. Whether we are in or out scarcely seems to matter any more. In imagining it does, many of our leading businesses and politicians are woefully behind the curve. Something will eventually emerge from the wreckage. But whatever it is, it won’t be the status quo.
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Old 26th Nov 2014, 14:50
  #3570 (permalink)  
 
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UK faces £34bn bill for black hole in EU budget - Telegraph

If this doesn't strength UKIP's hand, then I don't know what will.
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Old 27th Nov 2014, 19:36
  #3571 (permalink)  
 
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Surprised that nobody has brought this one up yet....

EU lawmakers vote to break up Google

Given the nightmares in Euroland, and particularly those identified by Cape above, is it just me who thinks that these wasters should be trying to sort these problems rather than wasting time ( and my taxes ) farting around with something which ( 1 ) doesn't concern them and ( 2 ) just isn't going to happen....

Much as I dislike the way Google seems to plant cookies all over my PC, whichever sites I visit, it's a commercial business which just happens to be a very, very successful business and not a state owned / managed / protected /supported / etc, etc business which exploits these advantages....

I'm trying to imagine the reaction of these idiot EU arseh*les if the American politicos voted that any or all of Airbus, Deutsche Bahn, EDF, Veolia, Serco, Vodaphone, Lufthansa Group, etc, etc, should be broken up....

I reckon that there's even less chance of Google saying ' Jeez, these guys in Brussels are right, you know ' than the EU voting to disband itself on the basis that it is not needed / unfit for purpose / corrupt / waste of space / etc, etc....
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Old 27th Nov 2014, 20:31
  #3572 (permalink)  
 
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Brussels is fecked, look for a lot more insanity as it lashes out like the spoiled petulant brat that it is.
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Old 27th Nov 2014, 20:36
  #3573 (permalink)  
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Brussels is fecked

Succinctly and accurately put, Mr D., although perhaps the word "completely" could be inserted between "is" and "fecked" to add a bit of sparkle to your sentiments.
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Old 2nd Dec 2014, 08:11
  #3574 (permalink)  
 
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Pretty appalling, but as expected, and this type of reward for ineptitude is no worse than those often given in the world of commerce.

Herman Van Rompuy will be paid more than £500,000 by the EU to do nothing Generous golden goodbye and pension means the retired former EU president will earn £578,000 over the next three years


6:06PM GMT 01 Dec 2014


Herman Van Rompuy will be entitled to more than £500,000 for doing nothing at the taxpayer’s expense over the next three years, after finishing his term as president of Europe.

After standing down on Monday, the former president of the European Council will be paid £133,723 a year, 55 per cent of his basic salary, until December 2017 - to ease him back into life outside the world of Brussels officialdom.

The
Telegraph has established that Mr Van Rompuy will also receive a one off payment of £21,000 and, aged 67, he will be able draw a lifetime
EU pension worth £52,000 a year, taking his earnings to £578,000 over the next three years.

The "transitional allowance" does not require Mr Van Rompuy to do any work at all and the cash will be paid under reduced rates of EU "community" tax, which are far lower than taxation in his native country of Belgium.

The allowances are defended as "the price for the total independence" of senior European Union officials who must also "ask permission for any job they would like to do for 18 months after leaving”.

Mr Van Rompuy, a former Belgian prime minister, is retiring from a life in frontline politics to concentrate on his hobby of writing Haiku poetry while giving occasional lectures at the College of Europe, a training school for EU officials in Bruges.

While self-effacing in public, Mr Van Rompuy has not been a stranger to controversy over the perks of EU officialdom since he took the post in December 2009.

He was widely criticised four years ago for using his official motorcade of five limousines as a taxi service to take his family on 325-mile round trip to Paris airport en route to a private holiday in the Caribbean.

Nigel Farage, the leader of Ukip who was fined £2,700 by the European Parliament in 2010 for describing Mr Van Rompuy as having the "charisma of a damp rag”, attacked the payments.

"Van Rompuy's term in office has seen millions driven into poverty and unemployment by the eurozone crisis but he himself has hit the jackpot. The EU is a racket which looks after its own,” he said.

The cost of Mr Van Rompuy’s retirement is part of a much larger bill for the handover of the administration in EU as former European Commissioners serving in the last Brussels executive pocket “transitional allowances” worth around £30million.

Donald Tusk has officially taken over Mr Van Rompuy in the post as president of the European Council after being persuaded to take the job by a pay and perks worth over five times what he was earning as Polish prime minister.

He was initially reluctant to leave national politics, until he was persuaded by his wife Malgorzata to take the “prestige, better money and less problems at work” in July.

In his first day in the job, Mr Tusk compared Eurosceptics to the military threat posed by Russian in Ukraine as “threats to the EU coming both from outside and inside”.

"Today not only are eurosceptics questioning the EU's value, we have also enemies, not only sceptic,” he said.
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Old 2nd Dec 2014, 10:49
  #3575 (permalink)  
 
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I have no objection to these payments going to a competent EU President, assuming the ongoing payments have been effective in ensuring his impartiality over business contracts, etc. Seems very reasonable.

Van Rompuy on the other hand.....
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Old 2nd Dec 2014, 14:49
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Farage as usual sums it up! I do though take issue with Farage comparing Van Rompuy with a damp rag. They can be useful for putting out fires, amongst other things, and that is something Herman the low grade bank clerk was unable to achieve.

I'd also add that even the low grade clerks at the banks I deal with all look a lot more personable than him, in fact the receptionist at the HSBC branch I've just been into was a positive stunner ......... but she was a Katarzina, one of the many Poles who so enrich UK society in so many ways, beautifully spoken, helpful, professional and knowledgeable.
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Old 2nd Dec 2014, 14:52
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Nigel is a God,
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Old 2nd Dec 2014, 17:44
  #3578 (permalink)  
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When Ian Hislop starts to insult him you know that he's a threat to the Establishment.
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Old 2nd Dec 2014, 17:47
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Savaged by a banana?
I hope he remembers his Self-Defence Against Fresh Fruit lessons
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Old 11th Dec 2014, 07:14
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The euro is heading for disaster - what luck for David Cameron! - Telegraph
As Karl Marx was one of the earliest to point out, economics (though so much less interesting) is far more important than politics.

Marx considered all political events as epiphenomena. He viewed great men as blind instruments of irresistible forces which they themselves could hardly comprehend.

The Marxist vision of society has been disproved many times, always at epic human cost. However, his doctrine that productive forces propel history has stood the test of time – and is invaluable for an understanding of the current predicament of the European Union.

It elegantly explains why European Monetary Union was destined to fail. The state socialists and former communists who invented the euro never got to grips with this aspect of Marxist thought. Only Conservatives with an intelligent appreciation of economics and history – an enlightened congregation that included Margaret Thatcher, Oliver Letwin, Peter Lilley, Tim Congdon, John Redwood, Nicholas Ridley and Alan Walters – grasped that the EMU would collapse under the weight of its own contradictions, and that it was folly to construct a single currency before the political conditions were in place.
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