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Japan nuclear power stations

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Japan nuclear power stations

Old 14th Mar 2011, 18:48
  #41 (permalink)  
 
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FSL
DHR (decay heat removal) produces about 7% of full output for this type of reactor from what I've read, depends on the decay products - the fuel used. Where I worked to normal ambient with cooling was several months. Opps they are struggling with cooling, and the reactors are 'turned oft' - control rods fully engaged, as this happened automatically when the earthquake hit. Makes me wonder about the choice of design, but that was prolly the best at the time given they are nearly 40 yrs old. Thinks - so are the ones very close to me, but then again I had a hand in building and testing them and the design is inherently safe, not like them as a designer of them claimed they were not built to withstand earthquakes or tsunamis
beeb:
Japanese engineer Masashi Goto, who helped design the containment vessel for Fukushima's reactor core, says the design was not enough to withstand earthquakes or tsunamis and the plant's builders, Toshiba, knew this. More on Mr Goto's remarks to follow.
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Old 14th Mar 2011, 18:58
  #42 (permalink)  
 
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From Chernobyl and a mates dad who was in that game.

Stay clear of milk products especially if its goats milk.

It concentrates the isotopes and goats are especially good at proccessing them into milk.

Also filter feeding shell fish and anything that is above them in the food chain and the seaweed won't be a good idea either if they are flushing with sea water.
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Old 14th Mar 2011, 19:18
  #43 (permalink)  
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To put it in perspective, this is a 3 Mile island, not a Chernobyl.

The design is such that there is not going to be a major release of radiation and they can afford to wait months or years for the core remnants to cool. When it's done so they'll use robots to cut up the waste and retrieve it for disposal before sealing the them up - which is exactly what they would have had to do in only a few years when they reached the end of their planned life.

For the all the hysteria over 3 Mile Island and the effect on the US reactor program, no-one died and the clean-up went as planned and finished in 1985 at a total cost of $1billion spread over 14 years.

As for the current radioactive leakage - it's far less than released by a single coal fired power station over just a few years - and which is continuously blasting into the air.
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Old 14th Mar 2011, 19:46
  #44 (permalink)  
 
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Another interesting article here, and it even explains things in a way eve a Sun reader could understand.

Fukushima is a triumph for nuke power: Build more reactors now! ? The Register
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Old 14th Mar 2011, 19:49
  #45 (permalink)  
 
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Trouble is the Greens are going to make hay out of this and as far as I am concerned nuclear power is the only sane way to go for our future energy needs.
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Old 14th Mar 2011, 20:00
  #46 (permalink)  
 
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importantly questions about whether Fukushima has a "core catcher"
...and if it doesn't, whether what is under the reactor will disperse and immobilise the fuel melt. Sand or shale would be good I imagine - the former would form into a glass, much like Sellafield's waste vitrification plant.

What you don't to happen is for any molten fuel to pool and go critical i.e. for the chain reaction to re-start. That would release a massive amount of heat and radiation. The fuel would eventually melt its way through the primary containment.
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Old 14th Mar 2011, 20:09
  #47 (permalink)  
 
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Not having read all the posts (sorry) I have been informed that reactor #3 uses MOX as fuel. This is Uranium and Plutonium oxide, unlike #1 and#2 which basically use Uranium as the heating factor.

Now one should be worried about any leaks of #3 reactor which become airborn, one micron of Plutonium breathed in and caught in lungs more than likely result in fatality over weeks or months.
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Old 14th Mar 2011, 20:10
  #48 (permalink)  
 
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The fuel would eventually melt its way through the primary containment.
And then? ...................

I have been informed that reactor #3 uses MOX as fuel.
Oh dear, now what do we do?
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Old 14th Mar 2011, 20:15
  #49 (permalink)  
 
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Then it would get stopped by the next part of the containment.
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Old 14th Mar 2011, 20:18
  #50 (permalink)  
 
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Get ones ass ASAP out of it. Do a Google on MOX very very nasty. Why did the US ships depart like sh*t off a hot shovel.
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Old 14th Mar 2011, 20:29
  #51 (permalink)  
 
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Now one should be worried about any leaks of #3 reactor which become airborn, one micron of Plutonium breathed in and caught in lungs more than likely result in fatality over weeks or months.
Really? Then why does the US Department of Energy say that the lifetime risk of cancer from breathing in 5000 Pu particles, each around 3 (THREE) microns wide, is 1% over the "national average"?

http://www.globalsecurity.org/space/...eetOct2001.pdf

Best review your sources again, Daz, because your info is kinda wrong in a big way.
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Old 14th Mar 2011, 20:41
  #52 (permalink)  
 
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Get ones ass ASAP out of it. Do a Google on MOX very very nasty. Why did the US ships depart like sh*t off a hot shovel.
They moved for precautionary reasons, they could go into full "radiation" mode but why do that when they can just move out of the way? After all, they stayed to offload all the stuff so moving out of the way makes sense after they got exposed to the "cloud" on the way in, with the 17 crew members who did get contaminated getting the equivalent of a month's worth of background radiation after their work in Sendai.

But, I'll tell you what, get us all a link that says there has been a massive leak of radiation from No.3 and then you can have your hysteria.
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Old 14th Mar 2011, 20:46
  #53 (permalink)  
 
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Hellsbrink, rather an old study 2001. Jezz we never had mobile broadband then. I shall update you later.
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Old 14th Mar 2011, 21:01
  #54 (permalink)  

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I Know This is Only a Media Report

Fears of a meltdown at one of the troubled nuclear reactors in Japan have grown after officials said its fuel rods were "fully exposed", as the country grappled with a growing humanitarian and economic crisis after Friday's devastating earthquake and tsunami.

Air pressure inside the No.2 reactor at the Fukushima Daiichi plant, located 250 kilometres north of Tokyo, rose suddenly when the air flow gauge was accidentally turned off, its operator Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) said.

Cooling water was blocked from flowing into the reactor, leading to full exposure of the rods at about 11.00pm on Monday (1.00am AEDT on Tuesday). When the rods are exposed and temperatures rise within the containment vessel, the rods could lose their vertical shape and melt down.

The government's nuclear safety agency said the rods were fully exposed for about 140 minutes, Kyodo news agency reported.

"We are not optimistic but I think we can inject water once we can reopen the valve and lower air pressure," a TEPCO official told reporters.

SMH

and welldone TEPCO
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Old 14th Mar 2011, 21:09
  #55 (permalink)  
 
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While you're here, daz, you got any source for that or was it something you pulled out of your ass?
Plenty reports out there saying the US warships have temporarily moved away due to the leak of radioactive material from No.3, with the 17 crew who were busy in Sendai being hit with a pretty low dose.

But methinks Daz has been to the "Sun School of Journalism" in regard to the speed of the movement of the ships.
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Old 14th Mar 2011, 21:43
  #56 (permalink)  



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Gentlemen, could the thuggish tone of the debate debate please be replaced by something a bit more adult and civilised?
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Old 14th Mar 2011, 21:59
  #57 (permalink)  
 
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One shall try, FF.

Now, back to the discussion about plutonium.

Here's a more "up to date" one for you, Daz, after an accidental exposure to Pu in a lab.

Information Update: July 10, 2008 No Significant Health Risks Expected from Plutonium Exposures

For the small number of laboratory personnel whose test results indicated internal plutonium exposure, none of the dose estimates received so far exceeded 400 millirem (4 milliSieverts, mSv) and most were below 100 millirem (1 mSv), according to radiation health physicist Richard Toohey of the Oak Ridge Associated Universities. For perspective, the average annual exposure of the general public to natural background radiation in the Boulder, Colo., area is about 450 millirem (4.5 mSv), based on estimates from the National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements. Natural background radiation comes from cosmic rays, the ground (e.g., rocks) and the atmosphere (e.g., radon gas). The radiation dose for a typical chest X-ray is 10 millirem (0.1 mSv) and an abdominal CAT scan is 1,000 millirem (10 mSv), according to the Health Physics Society.
The increased overall risk probability for developing cancer from a radiation dose of 400 millirem (4 mSv), said Toohey, is 0.04 percent during an individualís lifetime. According to the National Cancer Institute, the average person born today has an aggregate lifetime risk of about 8 percent of contracting lung, liver or bone cancer, the principal potential health effects from plutonium exposure.
Additional, more sensitive tests are being conducted to confirm these initial dose estimates. Results are due to be delivered in up to four weeks. Estimating plutonium exposures is complex and dependent on many variables. Nevertheless, even if the total exposures are several times the dose estimates received so far, the affected personnel would not be expected to suffer significant health effects, according to the radiation health physicians and experts.
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Old 14th Mar 2011, 22:45
  #58 (permalink)  
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AFP News Agency reporting 'serious radiation leak' . . .
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Old 14th Mar 2011, 22:51
  #59 (permalink)  
 
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It continues to get more serious for the plant

2207: Japan's Chief Cabinet Secretary, Yukio Edano, has said a partial defect has been found inside the containment vessel of reactor 3 at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, the Kyodo news agency reports. He has also said the reactor is "not necessarily in a stable condition". Early on Tuesday morning, officials said pressure inside the container had dropped and sea water was being pumped in to cool the fuel rods
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Old 14th Mar 2011, 22:53
  #60 (permalink)  
 
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G-CPTN, dead pan mentioned the French in Post 31 I believe. I suspect you can put them on the "worst case" side of the story.

... "Level four is a serious level," ASN President Andre-Claude Lacoste told a news conference, but added: "We feel that we are at least at level five or even at level 6."
Could be a case of Pete and Repeat (AFP).
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