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Railway trains, and the things I didn't know.

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Railway trains, and the things I didn't know.

Old 27th Dec 2010, 09:56
  #61 (permalink)  
 
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As ever it's a matter of size, james. The A1 you described as a repro steam loco is probably at the top end of what could be practically fired by hand. I've ridden on the footplate of an A3 (think Flying Scotsman) which was being worked hard and the fireman was certainly earning his pay. As you say Beyer-Garretts and the big articulated Mallets used in the US and elsewhere all had mechanical firing (those which weren't oil-fired, of course), no one fireman could have kept up with the amount of steam required when they were working hard.
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Old 27th Dec 2010, 11:17
  #62 (permalink)  
 
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US law required a mechanical stoker for grate areas over 50 square feet - which is the size of the A1 grate. However, mechanical stokers are not as efficient in keeping the right fire going as hand firing, and also tend to grind up a lot of the coal so that you get 'fines' which go up the chimney unburnt. There were two or three of the BR 9F freight locos fitted with mechanical stokers: they were used mainly on Washwood Heath to Glasgow night freights via the Settle and Carlisle line.

Especially in the western US, there was a lot of oil firing, as on the Southern Pacific 'cab forwards' used over the Donner Pass. The Durango and Silverton line is hand fired coal - about 4 tons in 3 hours at an altitude going from 6000 to 9000 feet. The fireman wasn't a big chap either! I believe the BR limit was considered to be one ton an hour, and on the Somerset and Dorset with the Pines Express, they could be hitting that when they had 420 tons of load.
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Old 27th Dec 2010, 13:59
  #63 (permalink)  

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Big Bertha, the famous Lickey Banker

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Old 27th Dec 2010, 14:33
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Another Midland design with strangulated steam ports. Derby weren't at all effective at producing good steam circuits.
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Old 27th Dec 2010, 15:14
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The locomotive in the background is still used on the run from Skagway to Whitepass. Not sure just how often, as the diesels seem to used most of the time. It is quite an uphill haul and a worthwhile trip. I suppose it is the cruise ship industry that keeps it alive.
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Old 27th Dec 2010, 15:17
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A shot of the route to Whitepass:
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Old 27th Dec 2010, 18:13
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Beyer Garretts in Queensland video

This is in Ipswich:



Click on Picture Gallery - Dorrigo Steam Railway
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Old 27th Dec 2010, 23:00
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Innuendo, the loco in your pic is a 2-8-2 which is known as a Mikado after, I believe, a class of Baldwin 2-8-2s which were built for export to Japan in the 1890's (the Mikado being the title of the Japanese emperor). The name was dropped in WW2 and changed to MacArthur, but reverted to Mikado afterwards

Other wheel arrangements had names, eg Pacific (4-6-2), Atlantic (4-4-2) and Prairie (2-6-2), but why some others remained unnamed I do not know. Any idea Radeng?
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Old 27th Dec 2010, 23:59
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TTN, interesting background. The route from Skagway to Whitepass is pretty spectacular and building it cannot have been easy. I took a lot of photos but not sure just how much I should post without going too OT. However here is another old soldier that has done his time, a bit obscured by greenery but you seem to be well informed. Anything on this one?
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Old 28th Dec 2010, 00:15
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Originally Posted by Tankertrashnav View Post
Other wheel arrangements had names, eg Pacific (4-6-2), Atlantic (4-4-2) and Prairie (2-6-2), but why some others remained unnamed I do not know. Any idea Radeng?
I believe that these names came from the time when traffic across N. America was being developed. As the distances covered became greater, so there was a need for heavier locomotives with longer endurance. Iron Horses for courses! The load on each wheel set was the limiting factor before the track 'spread' under the (as previously mentioned) coned wheels, or just subsided. The heavier the loco, the more wheelsets required. The downside of this is of course, more wheels=more bearings=more friction.

Two other names: 'Mogul' (dunno why): 2-6-0, as I recall, and of course the LNER had hundreds and hundreds of 'Jintys' - wee tank engines which buzzed about all over the system and were the workhorses of the light loads, both passenger & freight.
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Old 28th Dec 2010, 00:16
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innuendo,

I have no idea how many is too many, but in my opinion there is no such number. Please keep them coming. Just one request please- a little info about general location would be appreciated, Ta.

And to Mr Rivets and all contributors to date, thanks for raising the standard of Jet Blast, and lifting it out of the bog. For this newcomer this thread is the difference between giving up PPRuNe or sticking around.

I must see if I can find anything to contribute.
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Old 28th Dec 2010, 02:01
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OK Quiz, a couple more. The White Pass and Yukon route has one terminus in Skagway, climbs about 2900 feet in 20 miles or so.
This link gives some idea of the history, (hope I am not violating our host's rules here ),
White Pass & Yukon Route Railroad History
As you can see the track bed was really blasted from the rock face.
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Old 28th Dec 2010, 02:08
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One of the original bridges, now replaced with something a bit more robust.





I'll keep the images a bit smaller, don't want to hog the space.
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Old 28th Dec 2010, 03:41
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Neat.

Pride and joy in my neck o' the woods is K88. K88 ended her first life in 1927 and served as a stopbank in a river until 1974 and beautifully rebuilt by volunteers at Tinwald, South Island, NZ.

As the new kid on the block I'll play is safe and post a link and practice later to post video directly, but here is K88 and friends.

YouTube - NZ Railways Rogers K class & NZR Ka class

Quiz
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Old 28th Dec 2010, 04:41
  #75 (permalink)  
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Everything you ever wanted to know about locomotive wheel arrangements....



and this little beauty can be found at Kingman, Arizona


Last edited by allan907; 28th Dec 2010 at 04:55.
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Old 28th Dec 2010, 06:13
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Couple of beauts rusted solid to the rails and slowly reverting to iron oxide in Luau (Pereira d'Eca) in Angola. Tried to take some pics but got hustled away by AK wielding halfwits who claimed they "belong to the People" and that taking pictures would cost me $100.

Nice restoration project if they could be salvaged and "the People" convinced to allow them a new lease on life.
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Old 28th Dec 2010, 08:22
  #77 (permalink)  
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Talking to my pal in the Uk about this thread, he mentioned a program that's been repeated lately called something like, "Hill Railways of India." It seems one of the subject services is the last operational steam service in the world. (unless you know better.)

One of the inclines is 1:12, and the traction was by toothed thingie.

A load of 5 tonnes of coal on one trip was also mentioned. I can imagine being a bit stiff after a trip like that . . . glad we didn't have to run airyplanes on coal.

Sounds like an interesting program. Anyone seen it?


Here's one link: BBC - BBC Four Programmes - Indian Hill Railways, The Darjeeling Himalayan Railway

Bds tell me it's not available in this area.
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Old 28th Dec 2010, 08:37
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It is on BBC2 at 9am today Mr Rivets,I watched it first time round, great stuff,the railways are still a huge industry in India.
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Old 28th Dec 2010, 08:53
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There's always Rovos who run a steam passenger service in SA. Luxury rail travel for the discerning steam buff....

Luxury Train Travel
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Old 28th Dec 2010, 10:07
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Anything on this one?
Sorry Innuendo, rather too many bushes in the way! All I can say is it's in need of TLC (and someone with very deep pockets!)

Re wheel arrangements, the French of course had to be different, they counted the axles, not the wheels, so a Pacific 4-6-2 became a 2-3-1 (hence Honneger's orchestral piece Pacific 231). In another system the driving axles were ascribed a letter instead of a number, so a pacific became a 2C1. The Southern Railway in England briefly used the system post WW2.

Sorry,I'm rambling, off for a cup of tea from my thermos and an egg sandwich
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