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Car stuff (UK)

Old 12th Aug 2010, 12:25
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Car stuff (UK)

I haven't found a conclusive answer on the car forums I have read or on the DVLA website, so knowing that PPRuNe is the fount of all knowledge here goes.

Background
Picking up a new car for the missus tomorrow
Missus' same insurance policy for old car and new
Transfers at the point when new car is collected
Old car then uninsured
Fine, as new owner collects it tomorrow evening

Question
Can the old car be used to go and collect the new one and then driven home afterwards by me on the basis that I have "any car third party" cover on my own insurance for my car? Missus' old car worth peanuts so premium increase aside not worried if it gets bent with third party cover, just the legal aspect of having a taxed and MOTd car on the road for which there is not an insurance policy for it specifically.


TVM
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Old 12th Aug 2010, 12:29
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You can drive any car on your own insurance if the policy covers you for third party risks in any vehicle. I just had a mix up over insurance when buying a new car and had to drive my old one home on the new car policy, cos the new car wasn't ready for delivery.
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Old 12th Aug 2010, 12:55
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In order to drive another vehicle that is not on your insurance policy using the third party in any vehicle option, the car MUST be insured in its own right (eg be the named vehicle on an insurance policy).

Therefore, if the old car does not have its own insurance policy, you can not drive it on your policy.

Most insurance companies are sensible about this though, and insure both cars on the same day.
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Old 12th Aug 2010, 13:06
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Blacksheep:
Thanks. I know I am covered "insurance-wording wise" it was just whether legally the vehicle had to have an insurance policy connected to it. If not, then I could go to the post office to buy a tax disc for any car I don't own and show the "any car third party" clause on the policy for my car as evidence that the car is insured.

So, you drove the car you mentioned, and you were insured third party according to the wording of your policy, but strictly according to the law, was it legal?


jimma:
Thanks, too. This is the crux of it and is what I thought. My wife's insurer has indeed insured both cars on the same day but the moment she takes ownership of the new car, the old one is no longer covered. This was explained clearly by the insurer several times to stress the point.

I don't think we will be using her old car tomorrow for the drop off!

Last edited by The late XV105; 12th Aug 2010 at 13:14. Reason: Update in view of simultaneous posting
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Old 12th Aug 2010, 13:17
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When we picked up my wife's new car last year her insurance policy covered both cars for a few days at no extra charge. I think the cover on the new car started at midnight on the day we were collecting it and the old car was covered for 7 days.
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Old 12th Aug 2010, 13:23
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It depends very much on the insurer. Some will provide overlapping cover, some won't.
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Old 12th Aug 2010, 14:47
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Best to contact the Insurance Co to check how long the cover
would be for the old car.
Better safe than out of pocket.
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Old 12th Aug 2010, 14:48
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It depends very much on the insurer. Some will provide overlapping cover, some won't.
Correct, Keef, and the little red telephone insurer is one of the latter; I even tried to pay an additional premium to get overlapping cover but the answer was a polite but firm "no".

My wifes car is therefore NOT (confirmed, NOT) insured after we collect the new one, and on the basis that my understanding of the law was probably correct and my own third party cover is not enough, this means it needs to stay at home tomorrow.

Cheers All,
XV
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Old 12th Aug 2010, 14:56
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Drop the misuss outside the showroom. Make her stand there in the wind & rain until you get home in the old banger & then tell her to get the new car. Simples.
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Old 12th Aug 2010, 15:05
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I knew of someone who drove a transporter to collect his new car, then, when unloading it, it ran away and crashed into his 'old' car (Pontiac GTO) parked in his driveway. The damage was such that the new car was winched back into the transporter and returned to the manufacturer (in Italy) to be repaired (Lamborghini).

As it happened, I don't suppose the existence of insurance would have been a factor for the person (ie his family was extremely rich).
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Old 12th Aug 2010, 18:47
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While this thread is running, I'd like to ask you lot: What does the term "Excess" mean when you hire a car? I'm sure it's called something else back home. I'm a bit embarrassed to ask the rental guys. And is purchasing Excess Reduction worth it?
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Old 12th Aug 2010, 18:56
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An excess is a financial contribution that you the policy holder agree to make in the event of a claim. Usually the greater the excess, the lower the insurance should cost. it's just a quid pro quo.
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Old 12th Aug 2010, 19:22
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is purchasing Excess Reduction worth it?
That depends on whether you expect to have a claim. Even if the incident is not your fault, the excess still applies (though you may be able to reclaim this from whoever hit you). If you receive damage to the vehicle when it is parked, then you might have no idea who the third party is - or who their insurer might be).

In short, if you are happy to 'accept the risk' that you may be charged the excess (for example if the hirer decides that there is damage of which you are unaware!) then don't pay for the additional insurance. This is frequently an expensive charge, and, if you are a regular user of hire cars you might like to arrange your own insurance (probably cheaper than the per diem cost of using the hire company's insurance).

If your car hire is being paid by your employer then take the extra cover (unless specifically told otherwise). You might be able to discuss this with your employer (or it might be better not to mention it . . . ).

In summary, an (insurance) excess is the amount of any claim that is not covered by the insurance. For regular folk it stops minor claims - for someone hiring a vehicle it means the user pays . . .
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Old 12th Aug 2010, 20:22
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In order to drive another vehicle that is not on your insurance policy using the third party in any vehicle option, the car MUST be insured in its own right (eg be the named vehicle on an insurance policy).
My policy with a well known insurer states no such thing.

In the case in point I presume the old car is OWNED and registered to the wife.
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Old 12th Aug 2010, 20:45
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On the topic of rental car insurance and the excess, this is a real money spinner for the rental companies, along with the 'can we sell you the tank of fuel?' scam whereby they sell the same 1/4 tank or so of fuel remaining in the tank over and over again.

Typically the excess waiver is 5/day. This company sells annual policies starting at about 40 and you only need to rent for about 10 days and it's paid for itself.

Car Hire Insurance | Car Rental Excess Insurance

They are an efficient and helpful company and I can recommend them.
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Old 12th Aug 2010, 20:47
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I think I've found a snippet that confirms what I suspected before posting and what some of the other posts had indicated.

In this link I read "It is compulsory for vehicle owners to have at least third party insurance against liabilities."

Given that my wife is the registered owner, the car indeed stays on the drive tomorrow and cannot be driven using my third party cover.

Thanks to all for contributing and Parapunter for spilling my coffee.
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Old 12th Aug 2010, 21:18
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You could explore the possibility of buying "day insurance" - it's typically used if you borrow a car from a dealer or maybe if you are test driving a car.

It normally costs 10 a day
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Old 12th Aug 2010, 21:25
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You are reading more into the statement than can be deduced from the loose wording.

The implication from that sentence is the fact that it is compulsory to have minimum insurance to drive on a public road.

I maintain that I can drive a car belonging to someone else and meet the minimum legal requirement of having third party insurance provided by my own policy. Nowhere does it say that the driven car has to be insured in its own right.
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Old 12th Aug 2010, 21:32
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Selling a car question (UK)

Cron may be purchasing another car and if so will thus have old car sitting on drive.

So, if I sell the old one and the purchaser drives off and through a speed camera how do I prove it wasn't me at the wheel?

Sorry to be a bit dim about this..

Many thanks for any input.
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Old 12th Aug 2010, 21:34
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However, you cannot tax a vehicle unless it has appropriate insurance, and, if stopped by the Police they will want proof that it is covered by insurance. I'm not certain, but I believe that someone, somewhere has to have it covered, otherwise it won't show up in their system. Producing the certificate for another vehicle isn't likely to impress them, either.
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