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Family phrases or sayings

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Family phrases or sayings

Old 8th Aug 2007, 10:55
  #21 (permalink)  

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Me old ma got TB in 1974 but survived, we all had to be tested.

My best mate also got it a couple of years later. He almost died, and now has only a third of a lung on one side; the doctors weren't used to seeing it and missed the symptoms for almost a year. We used to go running a lot together; he went from being a very fast runner to a semi-cripple in months. They said if he hadn't been so fit he would have died from it. You didn't get to sue the health authority in those days.

Back to the main subject; someone who was a bit scatty or forgetful was said to be "Doolally" (I have no idea what it means or where that comes from). We have a friend known as "Doolally Sally" to differentiate between her and "Pally Sally" across the road. We could always use surnames I suppose, but that's too difficult.....

Aha! just found this: http://www.abc.net.au/newsradio/txt/s1412540.htm
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Old 8th Aug 2007, 11:07
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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I think the full phrase was "Doolaly Tap" Mr S, summat ter do with our redcoats in India,going daft because of the heat.
oops sorry didn't click on yer link.
Another one was the much used "Cushty" by Dell Boy,meaning good or something good, old Indian Army chap I knew in me local used to say Cushty Vardy,seems like quite a few strange phrases originated in the days of our empire.
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Old 8th Aug 2007, 12:22
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Yerright, of course, Mr. D, but doesn't "Doolally Tap" sound like cockney rhyming slang, same as "Pony and trap"?

My father's side of the family used to say to someone who got something wrong "You're like a wooden man made of smoke".

Or of a clever person "He's half way there and back again, he is".

And my mother's favourite saying was "I'll give y'a thick ear across yer backside, if yer not careful!"
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Old 8th Aug 2007, 12:37
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When we were little and would be bickering with one and other Mam used to say......."Birds in their little nests agree" and another thing she said was....."You can't make a silk purse out of a sows ear".......that was when someone was trying to act better than they were. Oh, and "old dog for the hard road." Never really knew what that meant.....must ask her. When Daddy was off out to the pub and we wanted to know where he was going she'd say, "oh, he's gone to see a man about a dog." We took that as a given because Daddy was always buying dogs to breed with.
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Old 8th Aug 2007, 12:56
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Snappy:

Daddy was always buying dogs to breed with.


You can get arrested for that, you know.

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Old 8th Aug 2007, 12:58
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Dad's German mechanic was known for these two:

"F*ck 'em all but six. And f*ck them too."

"I'm so mad I could eat chicken. And I don't even like chicken."


Frequent response when asked what Mother was looking for:

"Whatever I can find"


Any quotes from our Uncle Eddie was always preceeded by:

"Ed said"


From Dad:

"I'd bet you a dollar to a donut"


When asked what toilet tissue my cousin's wife uses:

"Why I always use Scot" - cousin's name is Scott.
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Old 8th Aug 2007, 13:13
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My grandmother was rather dotty and had a lot of sayings, her favourite was when someone had become persona non grata: they were "Swept from the board" (as per a game of chess). To be "swept from the board" was a terrible and permanent fate.... so if we were naughty we were told "If you don't behave you'll be swept from the board!" and we would suddenly become little angels.
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Old 8th Aug 2007, 13:17
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Jerry Coe ......maybe that's why I am a bit of a bit*h sometimes.......God forgive me poor Daddy would be turning in his grave if he thought I was talking about him like this
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Old 8th Aug 2007, 14:01
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Devil

My favourite family phrase has to be my old man's comment about less than average looking women. " Christ son, look at her..she is like a pig in knickers"!
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Old 8th Aug 2007, 14:08
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Sayings

My Gran would say of fidgety grandchildren:

"Eeee, yer up and down like a Dicky Dancer!"

We never found out what a "Dicky Dancer" was.

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Old 8th Aug 2007, 14:45
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Not family, but a chap I used to work with was heard to exclaim "Fcuk a stoat" on a regular basis.
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Old 8th Aug 2007, 17:55
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daedalus...........my Granny used to say, "would ya sit in peace girl, your up and down like a fiddlers elbow"
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Old 8th Aug 2007, 20:17
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Daedalus

My old Nan (RIP) used to say of fidgets "Sit still. Have you got worms?"
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Old 8th Aug 2007, 20:32
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'Face like a bag o spanners', or 'well slapped ar5e' comes to mind,
and if when the family were together someone silently let a smelly one go;
'Christ! - that one came out with carpet slippers on!'
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Old 9th Aug 2007, 03:49
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When the kids were mere ankle-biters and not yet talking, instead of saying "stop it" when they were in imminent danger of either hurting themselves or doing something naughty I used to say

"DESIST FORTHWITH!"

Those were almost the first that each of them uttered!

Scroll forward a few dozen years and I was over in the UK on a visit to see the hordes of grandchildren (well, 3) and then I heard it........

"DESIST FORTHWITH!"

I suspect that it's going to be handed down the generations for millenia to come.
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Old 9th Aug 2007, 07:44
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My grandpa used to say "Oh my mother's black cat's ass" when expressing despair or frustration... usually when playing poker, apparently.
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Old 9th Aug 2007, 15:43
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An alternative to calling someone "doolally" my mother sometimes used to say the rhyme:

"Yer daft me duck, yer fulla balloons, yer say papap ter motor cars".

We kids sometimes wondered who the doolally one was, God bless her .
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Old 9th Aug 2007, 16:11
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Long time ago BF was half Scot half East End Jew. While generous to a fault, he was also.. errrrm... canny with his money.
Loath to part with cash when not strictly needed.

He did research at the Vrije Universiteit in Amsterdam, an establishment known in Holland as 'de VU'. Whenever I needed something, anything at all, his first reaction was always "Don't buy it, I'll get it from de VU". Washing powder, window panes, you name it and he sourced it at de VU.
It was one of the reasons we broke up, but by that time 'from de VU' had become a byword.

To this day, 25 years on, anything originating from a place of work is called 'from de VU' by my parents, our kids and our Dutch friends.

And when visiting them last summer in New Hampshire, I noticed that Henry's wife, whose never been to Holland, used the expression.
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Old 9th Aug 2007, 17:57
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"Doolaly Tap"

The term is British Army slang, from the Deolali sanatorium, Marashtra, India and is first cited in Fraser & Gibbons', Soldier & Sailor Words, 1925

See: http://www.phrases.org.uk/meanings/161900.html

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Old 9th Aug 2007, 18:49
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One's late lamented brother, when a tiny brat (before one's own time) apparently attempted to say "screwdriver" (not many toys in Teetering Towers) and it came out something like "googuvvy".

So forever after in the family, screwdrivers were googuvvys ...... one sometimes forgot when fixing a motorcycle with one's mate ...

"Oy Dan, pass me the big googuvvy will yer....."
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