Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Aircrew Forums > Flying Instructors & Examiners
Reload this Page >

Almost an FI! Where in the world do I go?!

Flying Instructors & Examiners A place for instructors to communicate with one another because some of them get a bit tired of the attitude that instructing is the lowest form of aviation, as seems to prevail on some of the other forums!

Almost an FI! Where in the world do I go?!

Old 20th Aug 2013, 09:54
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Market Harborough
Age: 34
Posts: 13
Question Almost an FI! Where in the world do I go?!

Hi folks,

I'm after some advice! I will soon be a qualified flight instructor with a piddly 300 hours with the usual CPL IR here in the uk and am really keen to get instructing around the world before returning back to England to hopefully live out the rest of my days as a professional Instructor with as many variations as possible!

But where do I start?! Where are there jobs for small timers like me?

Canada would be a bit of a dream of mine but I can get round to going at some stage. Anyone have any experiences in Europe? Africa? Asia? US? I have no ties and have just about enough money to get me started pretty much anywhere, including converting licenses if I must.

Help! The world is my oyster guys but I haven't a clue where to start!!!
DeanP is offline  
Old 20th Aug 2013, 11:15
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2001
Posts: 10,816
For the outside EASA stuff you really need 1000 plus under your belt before they will convert ratings. And even then some countries are more involved than others.

Also as well there isn't normally any problems finding locals to instruct so you might have problems with work permits.

Get a job in the UK build your hours then have a look at the large schools. If you can try and get CRI multi engine and build your IFR hours up by hook and crook. Getting in the sirrus side of things might help.

Other than that try for schools with CPL instruction you never know if you seem keen enough and anti disappearing off to the airlines they may go for you as a potential CPL/IR instructor and help you get the required quals.

But to be honest these days its virtually impossible to make the jump without going off to work commercially for a period to get the required hours to be able to teach CPL and IR.
mad_jock is offline  
Old 21st Aug 2013, 13:44
  #3 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Vigo-Spain
Age: 38
Posts: 213
You may want to try the US.
There are schools that offer you a J-1 visa after completing the CFI (or you start training under the J-1 straight away, not sure now)

And I guess the conversion from EASA to Canadian license may be reasonably easy. But the instructor rating you will have to do it from scratch.
The positive point about Canada is that obtaining a work permit could be less difficult than the US.

Best of luck!

Last edited by pablo; 21st Aug 2013 at 13:45.
pablo is offline  
Old 21st Aug 2013, 14:58
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2001
Posts: 10,816
You can't go near a J-1 visa unless you have virtually zero hours flying. I don't know how many but its way less than the 200 hours required to start the FIC.
mad_jock is offline  
Old 21st Aug 2013, 15:11
  #5 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: UK
Posts: 640
Didn't you have a plan before you started your FIC? Would the school where you are doing it give you some work to get you started and then move on from there if need be?
Parson is offline  
Old 21st Aug 2013, 17:10
  #6 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Vigo-Spain
Age: 38
Posts: 213
I had the idea the j1was valid for people without FAA CPL, regardless of flight time. I stand corrected.
pablo is offline  
Old 21st Aug 2013, 23:19
  #7 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Market Harborough
Age: 34
Posts: 13
I had a plan when I started which was to fly for the flying school I was working for. Unfortunately they decided to close up shop and I have since moved quite a distance across the UK.

This early on in my training the possibility of doing the odd trial lesson hasn't been discussed but fingers crossed! That being said, a new plan is needed!

I have heard from a few that there could be a possibility of getting some work in the US with a school that I convert with and complete their CFI course. From what I have read, it does seem to be rather hard to get a visa even if I was to get a job offer? (Please tell me if I'm wrong!)
DeanP is offline  
Old 22nd Aug 2013, 09:59
  #8 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Vigo-Spain
Age: 38
Posts: 213
hi

it is difficult. not impossible. probably easier for british germans etc compared to 3rd world nationals like me.
and definitely worth it. aviation in the us is awesome.

i suggest you contact flight schools offering easa programs in the us. pm me if you need names. i wont ad them for free here.

and dont pay too much attention to those wise guys that tell "you must have a plan of action" and other typical bla bla bla. we all try our bests but sometimes things happen.

best of luck buddy
pablo is offline  
Old 22nd Aug 2013, 13:35
  #9 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Market Harborough
Age: 34
Posts: 13
I was shown this morning a few websites such as FlyEFT that actually state in the flight instructor package that they offer that there is a strong possibility of attaining a job with them after completing the course with them providing you meet their standards. That's one hell of an incentive to go with them! I wonder how many students actually get jobs?! Can't be as easy as that surely?? Even down to the visa? If so I'd go tomorrow!!!
DeanP is offline  
Old 22nd Aug 2013, 15:03
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Placey Place.
Posts: 95
Chances of getting a J1 are very slim. Some schools were offering that possibility if you did a complete programme from Zero hours to CFI with them but I don't know if they are still running. At best it was only valid for 1 year as "optional practical training" but only as part of a complete programme, not just an instructor rating. It has nothing to do with whether you come from a 1st, 2nd or 3rd world country as the previous replier has stated. One possibility that may emerge in the next few years is the demand for mandarin speaking instructors, both in the far east and around the world including the US. It would certainly give someone an edge and the possibility to break into aviation where they would otherwise be watching their qualifications lapse.

I don't want to be all pessimistic and negative but I've not flown since 2010 and have researched the possibility to get into flying overseas extensively. The bottom line is that it's not easy to emigrate anywhere now unless you have certain specific skills that are in short supply and flying is never on that list. I'm predicting that instructors who speak Chinese will have a distinct edge in the coming decades and that countries may relax restrictions for such individuals. It's something I'm seriously looking at.
banjodrone is offline  
Old 22nd Aug 2013, 17:12
  #11 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Vigo-Spain
Age: 38
Posts: 213
DeanP,

it all depends on how badly they need instructors at the time you finish the course, and it's the same with every school, be it in the US or Europe.

If you can afford it I suggest you take 1-2 weeks and visit some of those schools that can potentially hire you after completing the FAA instructor training. Take a thorough look before you commit because some schools are aware of the difficult situation in Europe and they may try to get advantage, give you the FAA training but no job offer afterwards (and you may end up with a "not-very-useful" FAA license).

Cheers / Pablo
pablo is offline  
Old 22nd Aug 2013, 17:33
  #12 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Aug 2013
Location: Market Harborough
Age: 34
Posts: 13
Sound advice Pablo.

After emailing them they said you would be working on an F1 visa which is valid for a year. Would be a great opportunity if you could get the position. Saying that, I don't think I'm going to be booking a flight over on the back of that....

I think this is simply going to be a case of getting my self around as much flying schools as possible and get my CV out to as many AOC operators as possible too! Might get some good experience doing a bit of bush flying in Africa or something! I've seen bush pilots on Dave! They give jobs to pilots that can't even remember how to carry out a PFL!

Also isn't it 500 hours you need to carry out Part 135 flights in America and Canada?
DeanP is offline  
Old 23rd Aug 2013, 09:59
  #13 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2003
Location: Vigo-Spain
Age: 38
Posts: 213
imho going through the pain of getting faa licenses and a visa sponsor is only worth if you want to fly in the us really bad which was and still is my case

for the money and effort you may be able to do time building and for instance get the experience needed to unlock fi-ifr privileges and be more competitive in europe
pablo is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service - Do Not Sell My Personal Information -

Copyright 2021 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.