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Flying the pattern

Old 14th Feb 2013, 12:17
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Flying the pattern

What more can I say?
https://www.youtube.com/watch?featur...&v=f6q2VKsvQEQ
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Old 14th Feb 2013, 15:06
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A great video and should be required reading for the instructors at my home drome. Yesterday I was seriously considering logging cross country time after one ridiculously wide circuit
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Old 14th Feb 2013, 17:34
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The more stripes on the shoulder - the bigger the pattern. As the video so aptly illustrates.

But don't lose the key point of the video - the problem with large patterns is that it encourages low long powered approaches - bad news if the engine stops and much harder to judge the round-out and flare.

Me, I love glide approaches...
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Old 14th Feb 2013, 17:45
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But don't lose the key point of the video - the problem with large patterns is that it encourages low long powered approaches - bad news if the engine stops and much harder to judge the round-out and flare.
At 1:48 he specifically states this isn't the point he's making

He's saying people should get the feel for their aircraft better and use all the tools at their disposal to control an approach, including slipping to increase drag, rather than just positioning for a low long approach and using only power to adjust the profile.
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Old 14th Feb 2013, 19:34
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Hats off to that.

When can we get back to the 22 second circuit( I believe this was the Hunter record)? Much more efficient than 10 minutes.

I've seen students manage a circuit every 4 minutes without difficulty and the Pitts can manage a circuit every 2-3 minutes. But i guess the environment dictates that, I seem to recall biggin circuits lasting 10 minutes.

Also don't you feel nervous inside the circuit but out of gliding range?
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Old 14th Feb 2013, 20:55
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My Dad's last landing - ten years ago in a T-craft - was in the home field circuit, when he encountered carb ice on downwind. Forced landing, piece of cake, he managed it just as he'd been trained seventy years earlier in OX-5 days.
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Old 15th Feb 2013, 09:03
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Quote:
But don't lose the key point of the video - the problem with large patterns is that it encourages low long powered approaches - bad news if the engine stops and much harder to judge the round-out and flare.
At 1:48 he specifically states this isn't the point he's making

He's saying people should get the feel for their aircraft better and use all the tools at their disposal to control an approach, including slipping to increase drag, rather than just positioning for a low long approach and using only power to adjust the profile.
Well he says he isn't making the "bad news if the engine stops point" which I accept in part (though it depends on local factors and the aircraft - why wouldn't stay within gliding range if you could?)

More generaly being able to use all the tools at your disposal is definitely good practice. Apart from anything else you'll stand more chance in the field landing when the engine stops on a cross country flight if you are in good practice at controlling the approach without power.

(I fly the sort of aircraft where I teach students that the engine can stop at any time)
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Old 15th Feb 2013, 17:23
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Speaking of Taylorcraft and short circuits, there is this... Not me I hasten to add and definitely not one to try at home. I think there's probably a reasonable balance between the cross country circuit and this one.


Last edited by taybird; 15th Feb 2013 at 17:24. Reason: typo
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Old 16th Feb 2013, 00:45
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Having some fun in a light sport aircraft? How dare you!
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Old 16th Feb 2013, 08:08
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Ha! That's RobL at his best. I tried to beat him once in the Auster but could only manage 60 seconds!
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Old 16th Feb 2013, 10:45
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Was he flying one of those special offer experience flights for Groupon?
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Old 20th Feb 2013, 13:37
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The more stripes on the shoulder - the bigger the pattern
Well as an Airbus 4 striper I think there are many PPLs doing larger circuits in a Piper/Cessna than I do in an A330 - have managed sub 3 minutes, though I will admit this was in the SIM . If I am out of 90 day currency on light ac I can usually do my 3 landings in less than 10 mins airborne.

Last edited by foxmoth; 20th Feb 2013 at 13:41.
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Old 2nd Mar 2013, 18:19
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My daddy taught me a long time ago to fly a pattern such that if you lose the motor you can still get to the runway. Nuff said.

Bingo
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Old 2nd Mar 2013, 23:47
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My daddy taught me a long time ago to fly a pattern such that if you lose the motor you can still get to the runway. Nuff said.
Sound and sensible, but sadly impractical in many cases these days, generally as a result of required noise abatement flight paths.
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Old 10th Mar 2013, 18:44
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It seriously alarms me, just how much is left out of the PPL these days. No side slipping, no spinning, no aeros, no strip flying or proper terrain awareness. Put simply, if you fly at a large aeroclub or academy, you will be missing out, badly.

I also, cannot believe, having just been at a National aeroclub flying competition, judging junior aeros and competing senior, how shocking a huge amount of pilots are, at FLARING. I saw so few flares it just blew me away.

Does no one flare at aeroclubs these days? It appears they are relieved to land as they just let go of it all and the poor aeroplane just plonks on 3 point, fine if you are flying a real aircraft, but not a trike!
Jaysus....
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