Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Aircrew Forums > Flying Instructors & Examiners
Reload this Page >

Traffic separation vs traffic information

Flying Instructors & Examiners A place for instructors to communicate with one another because some of them get a bit tired of the attitude that instructing is the lowest form of aviation, as seems to prevail on some of the other forums!

Traffic separation vs traffic information

Old 11th Jun 2009, 08:53
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Australia
Posts: 43
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Traffic separation vs traffic information

Maybe i'm in the wrong forum but...

Can someone tell me the practical difference between traffic separation and traffic information in terms of the service ATC provides.

Why am I confused? Take class A airspace for example.
IFR is separated from VFR but
VFR have only traffic information on other VFR yet...

a) both have the same restrictions in terms of airways clearance ie. you go where you are told and nowhere else and

b) they're not going to vector two VFR flights into each other (or let them fly into each other without taking action for that matter).

PS i'm in Australia
bill.lumbergh is offline  
Old 12th Jun 2009, 06:31
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Australia
Posts: 889
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Informing versus separating

Traffic separation: ATC will give positive instructions that prevent two aircraft from getting too close to each other. Example: A is told to maintain 2000' or below, B is told to maintain 3000' or above.

Traffic information: ATC will give instructions that may or may not allow two aircraft to get close to each other. But they will tell each pilot where the other aircraft is. "See and avoid" applies! Example: A is joining the circuit on early left downwind. B is vacating the circuit via left crosswind. So A is told about B and vice versa, so the pilots will look out for each other and adjust their flight paths accordingly.

Note that in the second paragraph, the ATC instructions are quite vague, so there is a possibility that the two aircraft could be close to each other. On the other hand, ATC can be less specific, so can cope with more aircraft at one time. As long as both pilots are alert and the controller doesn't become too "controlling", both systems work well.

A good introduction to different airspace classes may be found here.
Oktas8 is offline  
Old 16th Jun 2009, 02:23
  #3 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Nov 2008
Location: Australia
Posts: 43
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Thanks

Gotcha'.

Looking at it in terms of VFR vs IFR and that's pretty much cleared it up. Thanks for the clarification.
bill.lumbergh is offline  
Old 16th Jun 2009, 23:06
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2006
Location: Europe
Posts: 716
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Well, separation is always required; it can be achieved by following instructions from an air traffic controller, in which case the flight is controlled. It may be achieved by the pilots, in which case the flight is uncontrolled. In various types of airspace, various separation services are offered/mandatory for different flights.

For practical purposes, I fly into both controlled (towered) airports and uncontrolled (AFIS) airports; with the former the responsibility for separation primarily lies with the controller (say class D airspace), while in the latter the responsibility rests with me (class G airspace), however, the AFIS service will give me information in a pertinent way.


And IIRC VFR is not permitted in class A airspace...
bfisk is offline  
Old 19th Jun 2009, 23:34
  #5 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: Australia
Posts: 889
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Well, separation is always required
I know what you mean bfisk, and yes aeroplanes mustn't get too close to each other.

But please note - when discussing ATC and airspace classes, the term separation carries a very precise meaning. In context, separation is not always required. It is not required in any airspace Class F or G, and it is only sometimes required in classes C to E.

Chees,
O8
Oktas8 is offline  

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.