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Converting EASA licence to Canadian (incl work permit)

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Converting EASA licence to Canadian (incl work permit)

Old 22nd Jan 2023, 13:13
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Converting EASA licence to Canadian (incl work permit)

Hi everyone,

I am a recently graduated pilot, holding an EASA frozen ATPL. I would love to add Canada as countries where I could look for pilot jobs (and especially seaplane pilot jobs). So I am looking for people who have knowledge on
1) Converting EASA frozen ATPL to a Canadian licence
2) Getting a Canadian work permit/visa as pilot

I have some basic research on both topics but I keep getting contradicting information. So anybody who can get me on my way, will gain my eternal gratitude. Any other information on getting a job as (seaplane) pilot in Canada is more than welcome!

Thank you in advance!

Greetings
Kriekos is offline  
Old 22nd Jan 2023, 17:55
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While I dont have an answer, I face a very similar problem.

I moved to Canada recently and hold a EASA PPL/IR/MEP license (500+ hrs). Also I have a FAA (based on) license. I would love to obtain the Canadian license and am not sure about the TC regulations and have (so far) no found anyone knowledgable about this topic. What is the best way forward?

Alternatively I am thinking about buying/operating a N-reg plane on my FAA license, so I would also be very grateful about information about this way forward.

Thanks!
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Old 23rd Jan 2023, 20:02
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cnovosel,

I'm afraid I don't have any specific guidance about getting the Canadian license but...I did remember that your "based-on" FAA PPL (FAR 61.75, I assume) cannot be used to get a TCCA license via the FAA-TCCA agreement governing this. So that option apparently isn't available. Too bad as it would perhaps simplify things. See Section 13a(1)c:

"The license must not have been
issued on the basis of another foreign license (see subparagraph 7a)."

https://www.faa.gov/documentLibrary/...AC_61-135A.pdf
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Old 24th Jan 2023, 03:10
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I can't help you with the right to work information. The pilot's licence is straightforward and any flight school should be able to tell you what you need to do.

https://tc.canada.ca/en/aviation/lic...foreign-pilots
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Old 24th Jan 2023, 11:42
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bafanguy, that condition—the bar against converting a licence issued on the basis of another licence—is frequently misunderstood. Both Transport Canada and FAA interpret it simply as meaning that the licence or rating resulted from a successful Canadian or US skill/practical test. For example, Transport Canada will issue, without a flight test, a multiengine land class rating to an applicant who has been issued with an equivalent rating by an ICAO Contracting State within the recent 12 months. Such a rating is ineligible for conversion under the US–Canada agreement. To make it eligible, a Canadian flight test would need to be passed.

cnovosel, section 202.42 of the Canadian aviation regulations prohibits a foreign-registered aircraft being operated in Canada for 90 days or more within the preceding 12 months, except in specific circumstances.

kriekos, as MH mentions it's a straightforward process that any suitable flight training unit can handle. You can find all Canadian flight training units in this Transport Canada database, https://wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/saf-sec-sur...eCulture=en-CA

If you are serious about pursuing a Canadian licence then you should undergo the medical assessment for a category one (class 1) medical certificate without delay. It can take the Civil Aviation Medicine Branch anywhere from 6 to 9 months to issue the initial certificate. Transport's database of Civil Aviation Medical Examiners is here, https://wwwapps.tc.gc.ca/Saf-Sec-Sur/2/CAME-MEAC/l.aspx

Notwithstanding lingering covid-related exemptions, which should be expiring at the end of this month, you'll need evidence of medical fitness to write exams and a valid/appropriate medical certificate to attempt flight tests. See sections 421.13 and 421.14 respectively in Part IV of the standards. Details on foreign credits and knowledge/experience/skill requirements for the CPL(A), aeroplane class ratings, and instrument ratings are in sections 421.30, 421.38, and 421.46 respectively. The long solo cross-country required for the CPL is more demanding than the ICAO Annex 1 standard. The night experience requirement is also more prescriptive. Should you wish to complete this flying in Canada, you may exercise PIC privileges using a Foreign Licence Validation Certificate (see AC 400-003), unless you are a resident of Canada. Note the interpretation given to solo flight time, subsection 400.01(1) in the regulations:

solo flight time means, with respect to the flight time
necessary to acquire a permit, licence or rating,
(a) in the case of a pilot, the flight time during which
the pilot is the sole flight crew member, and
(b) in the case of a student pilot permit holder, the
flight time during which the holder is the sole occupant
of an aircraft while under the direction and supervision
of the holder of an instructor rating for the
appropriate category of aircraft; (temps de vol en solo)


Information on the conduct of flight tests is in the schedules to section 428. Review the relevant flight test guides and study and reference guides published by Transport.

A letter of recommendation is required for the instrument rating flight test but not for the CPL test. The instrument rating will be valid either on single-engine aeroplanes (group 3) or both single- and multi-engines (group 1), depending on the group used for the skill test. The initial skill test must be done in an aeroplane (or an approved Level C or higher full-flight simulator) but subsequent proficiency checks may be done on approved flight training devices. See AC 401-004 and AC 401-005 for information on how Canadian instrument ratings are kept valid. The instrument rating and multi-engine skill tests cannot be combined. The CPL flight test can be attempted without first holding either an FLVC or Canadian PPL. The licence will be issued in the form of a passport-style Aviation Document Booklet. The application guide and form is here. Once the booklet has been received, you can proceed with the skill tests for the multiengine and instrument ratings. Rating privileges will be given immediately after a successful test.

A separate application must be made to Innovation, Science And Economic Development Canada (ISED) for the radiotelephone operator certificate (ROC-A) after passing a short multi-choice exam paper. See study guide RIC-21 published by Industry Canada. The exam can be administered by your flight training unit which should also assist you in making the application for the ROC-A. Make that a priority because ISED takes its sweet time issuing the certificate.

NavCanada publishes some useful local area weather manuals and radio phraseology guides here, https://www.navcanada.ca/en/aeronaut...al-guides.aspx

Electronic copies of the Canada Air Pilot (CAP) and the Canada Flight Supplement (CFS) are freely available under licence to registered users (no fee to register) at https://fltplan.com (Tools -> Documents). Many of the instrument rating exam questions and oral questions on the skill test are based on the CAP GEN document. Another useful document is the Aeronautical Information Manual. Some useful posters on VFR and IFR procedures at uncontrolled aerodromes and the airspace classification and structure are here. You might find the guidance intended for US pilots flying in Canada useful, see TP 15048.

Re work permits. There are too many factors to give an adequate summary of the options. Start with IRCC's Come to Canada Wizard. You might be eligible for a working holiday work permit. Otherwise, consider a study programme that culminates in a post-graduate work permit. If you wish to pursue a flight training course that is eligible for a PGWP, you will need to pick an FTU that is approved as a Designated Learning Institution. These are listed here.
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Old 24th Jan 2023, 13:18
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Originally Posted by selfin View Post
bafanguy, that condition—the bar against converting a licence issued on the basis of another licence—is frequently misunderstood. Both Transport Canada and FAA interpret it simply as meaning that the licence or rating resulted from a successful Canadian or US skill/practical test. For example, Transport Canada will issue, without a flight test, a multiengine land class rating to an applicant who has been issued with an equivalent rating by an ICAO Contracting State within the recent 12 months. Such a rating is ineligible for conversion under the US–Canada agreement. To make it eligible, a Canadian flight test would need to be passed.
selfin,

Well, it appears I've misunderstood. An FAA PPL issued under FAR 61.75 isn't issued as the result of a skills test, right ? So are you saying it does qualify for the TCCA-FAA reciprocity agreement ?
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Old 24th Jan 2023, 13:47
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No, restricted US pilot certificates issued under 14 CFR 61.75 are not eligible for conversion under the US–Canada BASA–IPL.
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Old 24th Jan 2023, 15:10
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Originally Posted by selfin View Post
No, restricted US pilot certificates issued under 14 CFR 61.75 are not eligible for conversion under the US–Canada BASA–IPL.
Ah so...that's how it appeared to me. Maybe I'm not as confused as I thought. But the day is young.
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Old 25th Jan 2023, 09:57
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It was poor wording on my part! With conditions, the Canadian and US experience requirements can be satisfied by flight training received from foreign instructors. Here is an example from the Canadian regulations that bears relevance to the OP's ambitions:

421.38 Requirements
(1) Seaplane Rating - Requirements

...

(d) Credits for Foreign Applicants

The holder of a pilot licence - aeroplane category, issued by a
Contracting State, shall be deemed to have met the seaplane training
requirements specified above, provided that the applicant:

(i) has completed a minimum of 50 hours flight time as
pilot-in-command in seaplanes during the 12 months preceding the date
of application for the rating, or

(ii) has met the prescribed standards of the State concerned, to act
as pilot-in-command of seaplanes during the 12 months preceding the
date of application for the rating.


Considering this rule, it might be worthwhile for the OP to do an EASA SEP (Sea) class rating. Were it the OP's intention to convert the Canadian licence/ratings to the US equivalent at some future point, in accordance with the US–Canada conversion agreement, then the Canadian SES class rating would not be eligible for conversion because the rating would not have been gained by way of a Canadian skill test. That is what is meant by "issued on the basis of a foreign license (sic)."

Transport Canada will also grant a (restricted) PPL to an ICAO PPL holder, who meets certain conditions, without a Canadian skill test being done. The licence will bear an annotation to the effect that it was issued on the basis of a foreign licence, being removed only upon completion of the skill test. Above I mentioned that OP could apply for a Foreign Licence Validation Certificate should any PIC flying on a Canadian aeroplane be necessary. However, the FLVC cannot be granted to persons who reside in Canada, in which case the (restricted) PPL can provide a temporary solution.
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Old 29th Jan 2023, 14:35
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selfin Thanks a lot for that detailed explanation, much appreciated!
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