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Need help to start career as a professional pilot

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Need help to start career as a professional pilot

Old 16th Sep 2017, 12:52
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Need help to start career as a professional pilot

Hello everyone,
I am an Indian looking to work in Canada as a professional pilot. I have zero experience. I am currently considering different flight schools in Canada like OAS and Langley. I want to know which is the best route to become a professional pilot and whether the iATPL course is worth it or not. Need guidance. Kindly help.
Thank you.
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Old 17th Sep 2017, 18:39
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Aren't there lots of cadet programs in India?
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Old 19th Sep 2017, 13:23
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Most important, make sure your English is up to par.

Spend a lot of time listening to live ATC. Polish your radio techniques using something like PilotEDGE. They will chew you out big time if you make mistakes on the radio. Study your radio phraseology. Consider getting a ham radio license in India and practice your radio technique with people from around the world.

Study all the ground school material you can before you start flying. Learn how piston and turbine engines work. Learn everything you can about aerodynamics. Study the aircraft manuals for aircraft like Cessna 150's and 172's.

Learn how to fly basic instrument procedures and what each instrument does. Learn how to deal with instrument failures. You can do this all in a high fidelity simulation. A2A simulations has excellent products for FSX/P3D. The difference between their sim products and reality is very slim indeed.

Learn how to keep your eyes outside the cockpit when flying VFR. Again you can do this using modern sim products. Do not use old or inferior simulators for this. Modern sim products are unbelievably good, don't listen to people that bash simulators - their opinions are outdated and they have not used modern simulators.

Fly simulators like you are flying for real. Take it seriously. Practice patterns, radio procedures, etc. Practice failures and complications. Practice engine and fuel management. Practice crosswind technique a LOT. There are two main methods people use to fly crosswind landings - practice both of them, do not become too comfortable with either particular one. Your real world instructor will probably insist on you using one or the other - just go with what he says is best when he is around.

Practice aerobatics and unusual flight attitudes and slow flight in the simulator.

Once you have a good flying ability in the sim (This will probably take upwards of 1,000 sim hours), come over and start your real training in earnest. Some things will be different from what you practiced in the sim - obey what your instructor says.

Once you have made it to the required number of hours you will probably be offered a job as an instructor at the flight school you learned at. Fly as an instructor there if possible. If they don't offer you a job, find another school that does. Make the best use of this time as possible - learn like a sponge. Once you have enough hours to be considered for a commercial operation, start applying for jobs. Eventually, someone will bite and take you on. Be prepared to move somewhere damned cold in the North of Canada, or perhaps the middle of nowhere in BC etc..

You will need a LOT of money to get from 0 to a commercially viable pilot. Make sure you have at least $50,000 (CAD) before you come. You will end up using most or all of this money for the training itself, more money if you need to pay for accommodation in Canada while you train.


That is my advice.
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Old 21st Sep 2017, 20:05
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Originally Posted by paradoxbox View Post
Most important, make sure your English is up to par.

Spend a lot of time listening to live ATC. Polish your radio techniques using something like PilotEDGE. They will chew you out big time if you make mistakes on the radio. Study your radio phraseology. Consider getting a ham radio license in India and practice your radio technique with people from around the world.

Study all the ground school material you can before you start flying. Learn how piston and turbine engines work. Learn everything you can about aerodynamics. Study the aircraft manuals for aircraft like Cessna 150's and 172's.

Learn how to fly basic instrument procedures and what each instrument does. Learn how to deal with instrument failures. You can do this all in a high fidelity simulation. A2A simulations has excellent products for FSX/P3D. The difference between their sim products and reality is very slim indeed.

Learn how to keep your eyes outside the cockpit when flying VFR. Again you can do this using modern sim products. Do not use old or inferior simulators for this. Modern sim products are unbelievably good, don't listen to people that bash simulators - their opinions are outdated and they have not used modern simulators.

Fly simulators like you are flying for real. Take it seriously. Practice patterns, radio procedures, etc. Practice failures and complications. Practice engine and fuel management. Practice crosswind technique a LOT. There are two main methods people use to fly crosswind landings - practice both of them, do not become too comfortable with either particular one. Your real world instructor will probably insist on you using one or the other - just go with what he says is best when he is around.

Practice aerobatics and unusual flight attitudes and slow flight in the simulator.

Once you have a good flying ability in the sim (This will probably take upwards of 1,000 sim hours), come over and start your real training in earnest. Some things will be different from what you practiced in the sim - obey what your instructor says.

Once you have made it to the required number of hours you will probably be offered a job as an instructor at the flight school you learned at. Fly as an instructor there if possible. If they don't offer you a job, find another school that does. Make the best use of this time as possible - learn like a sponge. Once you have enough hours to be considered for a commercial operation, start applying for jobs. Eventually, someone will bite and take you on. Be prepared to move somewhere damned cold in the North of Canada, or perhaps the middle of nowhere in BC etc..

You will need a LOT of money to get from 0 to a commercially viable pilot. Make sure you have at least $50,000 (CAD) before you come. You will end up using most or all of this money for the training itself, more money if you need to pay for accommodation in Canada while you train.


That is my advice.
Thank you so much for the highly detailed and a very helpful advice. I will definitely follow everything you said by the word.
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Old 25th Sep 2017, 14:39
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Be very careful with OAS. Their twin was unserviceable since April or May until a week or so ago, and after they let their ATPL students fly it a couple of times, they canceled one of their training days for the Chief Flight Instructor to take it on a personal trip. It then went mechanical again.

With the job market the way it is, a 4+ month delay on training is absolutely unacceptable and is costing these students job opportunities.
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Old 25th Sep 2017, 17:18
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I've never heard of this school, what is OAS?
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Old 25th Sep 2017, 22:29
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I've never heard of this school, what is OAS?
A quick Google makes me think the OP might refer to Ottawa Aviation Services.

Be very careful with OAS.
As one should with any school. I'd be suspect of any school who states "An aviation job for every graduate..." in bold and what appears 14 or 16 font, followed by "...that is the vision of..." in normal, 12 font. There is selling your organization, and then there is being over-the-top.
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