Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Aircrew Forums > Biz Jets, Ag Flying, GA etc.
Reload this Page >

Turbo Dak down in Antartica

Biz Jets, Ag Flying, GA etc. The place for discussion of issues related to corporate, Ag and GA aviation. If you're a professional pilot and don't fly for the airlines then try here.

Turbo Dak down in Antartica

Old 3rd Jan 2008, 19:53
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: May 2006
Location: Weymouth
Posts: 32
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Turbo Dak down in Antartica

Status: Preliminary - official
Date: 20 DEC 2007
Type: Basler BT-67 Turbo-67
Operator: Kenn Borek Air
Registration: C-FMKB
C/n / msn: 19560
First flight: 1942
Engines: 2 Pratt & Whitney Canada PT6A-67R
Crew: Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 4
Passengers: Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 6
Total: Fatalities: 0 / Occupants: 10
Airplane damage: Substantial
Location: Mt. Patterson (Antarctica) show on map
Phase: Takeoff
Nature: Survey/research
Departure airport: ?
Destination airport: ?

Narrative:

The DC-3 Turbo plane was charted by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) providing support to a group of researchers at a remote location in Antarctica. The airplane collided with drifted snow and ice while taking off from a field site near Mt. Patterson in West Antarctica. The six passengers aboard the plane were part of the NSF-funded portion of the international Polar Earth Observatory Network (POLENET) project, which is deploying GPS units and seismic sensors across Antarctica.

Sources:

NSF-chartered Plane Crashes While Taking Off from Remote Antarctic Field Camp (NSF, 21-12-2007)
CADORS Number: 2007C3509




Buzz Control is offline  
Old 3rd Jan 2008, 20:21
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Oil Capital of Central Scotland
Age: 56
Posts: 485
Received 9 Likes on 7 Posts
Ouch!!

Any word on the outlook? Short term on-site patches / repair & temporary CofA to major repair base, survey, secure & repair next year or is it W/O?
Donkey497 is offline  
Old 3rd Jan 2008, 21:01
  #3 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 1999
Location: Quite near 'An aerodrome somewhere in England'
Posts: 26,804
Received 270 Likes on 109 Posts
The aircraft was charted by the U.S. National Science Foundation (NSF) providing support to a group of researchers at a remote location in Antarctica. It collided with drifted snow and ice while taking off from a field site near Mt. Patterson in West Antarctica.

The six passengers aboard the aircraft were part of the NSF-funded portion of the international Polar Earth Observatory Network (POLENET) project, which is deploying GPS units and seismic sensors across Antarctica.

The aircraft sustained damage to the underside of the nose, the tail wheel collapsed, both main landing gears separated and both propellers were damaged.
BEagle is online now  
Old 3rd Jan 2008, 21:08
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: U.K.
Age: 46
Posts: 3,112
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
That must be a nightmare. The costs to repair that must be astronomic when you take into account the location.
Say again s l o w l y is offline  
Old 3rd Jan 2008, 21:24
  #5 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: Limbricht
Posts: 2,194
Received 6 Likes on 5 Posts
Hence it will, sadly, most likely be declared a w/o. Always sad to see DC-3s meet their end - even the Turbo variety!
Avman is offline  
Old 3rd Jan 2008, 21:35
  #6 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Land of troubled individuals in a nightmarishly impersonal and bureaucratic world.... Hey, Kafka was spot on!!!
Posts: 30
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Cool, a DC-3 with scimitar props!
Airline Pirate is offline  
Old 3rd Jan 2008, 22:10
  #7 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: SW France
Posts: 114
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Very crisp pictures with the artic sky backdrop- just a big shame to see a stricken bird in such a sorry state!
juniour jetset is offline  
Old 3rd Jan 2008, 22:18
  #8 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: SW France
Posts: 114
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Just looked at the company profile on wikipedia http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kenn_Borek_Air

seems the dc-3t was their only example of such a plane and now maybe.. it is no more... quite sad really!
juniour jetset is offline  
Old 3rd Jan 2008, 22:36
  #9 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Oil Capital of Central Scotland
Age: 56
Posts: 485
Received 9 Likes on 7 Posts
That must be a nightmare. The costs to repair that must be astronomic when you take into account the location.
Quite probably, but the insurance Company or the US taxpayer will probably be paying as it was on charter to the NSF.

Also as you are not allowed to leave anything at all permanentlyon the antartic continent, cost may not actually come into it. I seem to recall a Discovery programme implying that even sewage has to be repatriated from the South Pole base.......

Not sure just how serious they are about that requirement, but I'd reckon that scrapping a plane full of fuel, oils & various toxic/semi-toxic fluids & other potentially polluting materials by the normal means are not going to be acceptable in this case.
Donkey497 is offline  
Old 3rd Jan 2008, 23:40
  #10 (permalink)  
Drain Bamaged
 
Join Date: Mar 2000
Location: Earth
Age: 56
Posts: 536
Received 33 Likes on 13 Posts
It's been done before.

http://www.southpolestation.com/triv...y/321/321.html

Link to a incredible story about the recovery of a LC-130 down in Antarctica.


Last edited by ehwatezedoing; 4th Jan 2008 at 03:33.
ehwatezedoing is offline  
Old 3rd Jan 2008, 23:58
  #11 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2007
Location: Seattle
Age: 63
Posts: 164
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
What a great story of perserverance.

Thanks for, uh...digging it up.
CityofFlight is offline  
Old 4th Jan 2008, 00:43
  #12 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2001
Location: FNQ ... It's Permanent!
Posts: 4,290
Received 169 Likes on 86 Posts
Judging by that first photo, it's copped a good one on the nose and bleed somewhat!
Capt Fathom is offline  
Old 4th Jan 2008, 01:11
  #13 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: Florida
Posts: 4,569
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
Judging by that first photo, it's copped a good one on the nose and bleed somewhat!
I couldn't help but notice the same thing. I thought polar bear but then they don't range that far south

Then I thought about skydrol fluid and a busted cat or something like that.

Are the props painted with barber stripes on one side for the same reason that jet engine nose spinners are painted with a swirl?
lomapaseo is offline  
Old 4th Jan 2008, 01:58
  #14 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Texas, like a whole other country
Posts: 444
Likes: 0
Received 2 Likes on 1 Post
Also as you are not allowed to leave anything at all permanentlyon the antartic continent, cost may not actually come into it. I seem to recall a Discovery programme implying that even sewage has to be repatriated from the South Pole base.......
Were not the remains of TE901 (the plane, not the pax) left in place on Mt. Erebus?
Carbon Bootprint is offline  
Old 4th Jan 2008, 02:01
  #15 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2000
Location: CYZV
Age: 77
Posts: 1,256
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
This one blew over in a windstorm down there a couple of years ago, and it was salvaged.

pigboat is offline  
Old 4th Jan 2008, 04:07
  #16 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Texas
Posts: 1,919
Likes: 0
Received 1 Like on 1 Post
The DC-3TP is still a 1000 pound hydraulic system with 5606, the pink stuff, for fluid. Which is just about the right color for the stain under the nose. It also looks like some has dripped down from the rupture in the belly.
MarkerInbound is offline  
Old 4th Jan 2008, 09:37
  #17 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Oil Capital of Central Scotland
Age: 56
Posts: 485
Received 9 Likes on 7 Posts
Carbon Bootprint
Were not the remains of TE901 (the plane, not the pax) left in place on Mt. Erebus?
Yes, probably the bulk of the wreckage from the accident is still there. However from the nature of the crash and subsequent severe fire, the significant work done to recover and identify the as much of the remains of the passengers and crew as could be recovered, including removal of surface and near-surface wreckage, I think it may well be a case that other work to dig down into the melted ice & snow layers over a very large area to recover the rest would cause more damage to the environment than leaving the remainder in-situ.

A plane like this one, sitting on the surface, essentially still in one piece isn't in the same category as the unfortunate TE901.
Donkey497 is offline  
Old 4th Jan 2008, 10:59
  #18 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2003
Location: a green and pleasant land.......sometimes
Posts: 91
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Nice picture pigboat

I used to work over the other side of the hangar (DFC), and indeed, this one did return, not in any small part to the huge knowledge base at enterprise on the DC3. I hope the crew are all ok, best regards to all down there

Fly Ginger
Fly Ginger is offline  
Old 4th Jan 2008, 14:32
  #19 (permalink)  
niknak
 
Join Date: Dec 2001
Location: UK
Posts: 2,335
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
Not being an engineer, or a resident of either pole, how on earth do you go about salvaging a bent aeroplane from such a location?
niknak is offline  
Old 4th Jan 2008, 20:50
  #20 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2002
Location: EU
Posts: 644
Likes: 0
Received 0 Likes on 0 Posts
At least it seems it's often sunny weather down there
golfyankeesierra is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us - Archive - Advertising - Cookie Policy - Privacy Statement - Terms of Service

Copyright © 2024 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.