Go Back  PPRuNe Forums > Misc. Forums > Aviation History and Nostalgia
Reload this Page >

An Osprey a bit of Latin and A Dakota

Aviation History and Nostalgia Whether working in aviation, retired, wannabee or just plain fascinated this forum welcomes all with a love of flight.

An Osprey a bit of Latin and A Dakota

Old 4th Sep 2019, 18:54
  #1 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: On the edge of Dartmoor
Posts: 23
An Osprey a bit of Latin and A Dakota

looking through photographs of Dakota G-AMSV whilst under Air Atlantique ownership I noticed that circa 1988/9 the Aircraft carried an inscription in Latin on a scroll under the companies Osprey logo on the rudder. As far as I can tell it was the only member of the fleet to carry the script and it was shortlived having disappeared by 1990.
Can any contributors rember what it said with hopefully a translation?
I've deciphered what I believe to be "Quod non fear potest co??????".

Any help greatly appreciated.
browndhc2 is offline  
Old 4th Sep 2019, 18:58
  #2 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: UK
Posts: 3,672
Can you scan it post it ?

The first part is "that there is no fear".....
dook is offline  
Old 4th Sep 2019, 19:18
  #3 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Sneaking up on the Runway and leaping out to grab it unawares
Age: 57
Posts: 673
Quod non fear potest = Because there is no fear it is possible...


I've found a few photo's of the Dak in question but can not ascertain the last word.


Edit: The last word is conficimus which is the first-person present active indicative of conficio (meaning I accomplish or I achieve or I complete).


So the inscripton translates as:


'Because there is no fear it is possible to achieve'.

Last edited by ExAscoteer; 4th Sep 2019 at 19:40.
ExAscoteer is offline  
Old 4th Sep 2019, 19:32
  #4 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: UK
Posts: 3,672
I might be able to in Photoshop.
dook is offline  
Old 4th Sep 2019, 19:43
  #5 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: On the edge of Dartmoor
Posts: 23
Thank you for the fast responses and translations.

Unfortunately, the scanned image just pixelates as I only have a basic device.

Last edited by browndhc2; 4th Sep 2019 at 20:22.
browndhc2 is offline  
Old 4th Sep 2019, 20:23
  #6 (permalink)  
Thread Starter
 
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: On the edge of Dartmoor
Posts: 23
Many thanks. I've been pondering the answer for a week or so.
browndhc2 is offline  
Old 4th Sep 2019, 22:26
  #7 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Reading, UK
Posts: 10,598
Nothing to do with fear.

Loosely translated it means "we achieve what cannot be done".
DaveReidUK is online now  
Old 4th Sep 2019, 22:45
  #8 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Mar 2018
Location: Central UK
Posts: 278
Some people spouting utter bullcrap here.

Fear in latin is 'timor'.

This quote has nothing to do with English 'fear' and as far as I can discover "fear' is not a word that exists in latin.

Blimey! Neither I nor old Festig, my long-suffering Latin teacher would ever have believed I would be correcting someone else's Latin! Oorrah!

Also don't forget that the latin of whoever wrote that slogan may well have been on the same skill level as that of many postng here - so best not to assume it actually means anything...

Last edited by meleagertoo; 4th Sep 2019 at 23:15.
meleagertoo is offline  
Old 4th Sep 2019, 23:09
  #9 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2010
Location: Sneaking up on the Runway and leaping out to grab it unawares
Age: 57
Posts: 673
Originally Posted by DaveReidUK View Post
Nothing to do with fear.

Loosely translated it means "we achieve what cannot be done".
Nope. As I stated conficimus which is the first-person present active indicative of conficio =. Ergo (see what I did there?) it has NOTHING to do with 'We' which is a first person plural.
ExAscoteer is offline  
Old 5th Sep 2019, 07:01
  #10 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Reading, UK
Posts: 10,598
Originally Posted by ExAscoteer View Post
Nope. As I stated conficimus which is the first-person present active indicative of conficio =. Ergo (see what I did there?) it has NOTHING to do with 'We' which is a first person plural.
No, you're wrong, conficimus is the first person plural - conficere is a regular third conjugation verb.

You might want to check a Latin grammar book (sadly, I threw mine out 50 years ago after I got my O-level).
DaveReidUK is online now  
Old 5th Sep 2019, 07:38
  #11 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Reading, UK
Posts: 10,598
Originally Posted by meleagertoo View Post
Some people spouting utter bullcrap here.

Fear in latin is 'timor'.

This quote has nothing to do with English 'fear' and as far as I can discover "fear' is not a word that exists in latin.
Quite so.

The word in question is actually "fieri" ("to happen"), in fact "quod non fieri potest" (literally "that which is not able to happen", meaning "the impossible") is still used nowadays in legal circles.

Blimey! Neither I nor old Festig, my long-suffering Latin teacher would ever have believed I would be correcting someone else's Latin! Oorrah!
Likewise dear, long-suffering Mr Binns.
DaveReidUK is online now  
Old 5th Sep 2019, 09:32
  #12 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Auckland, NZ
Age: 75
Posts: 429
Originally Posted by DaveReidUK View Post
Nothing to do with fear.

Loosely translated it means "we achieve what cannot be done".
Yup. I read as "Quod non fieri potest conficimus" which indeed means "We accomplish what cannot be done." "Quod non fieri potest" seems to be a frequently used phrase, but Google doesn't find an example of the motto, so I guess someone with a good command of Latin used it to translate "We do the impossible" which someone had suggested would look nice on the aircraft.

"Fieri" is the present infinitive of fio, which is the passive of facio, to do or to make. "Conficimus" is the 1st person plural, present indicative, of conficio (3rd conjugation, a bit irregular, whilst fio is as irregular af.)

Unlike the more familiar slogan, they don't give a time scale for accomplishing the impossible.

Edit: whilst I was composing this post, and checking words in Lewis and Short (available in several amazingly affordable implementations for your phone) and Kennedy's grammar, DaveReid gave the explanations. He's right, except I wouldn't call "conficio" exactly regular, but the endings are straightforward enough. Should have said it's the 1 pl. present indicative active, to pin it down thoroughly.

Last edited by FlightlessParrot; 5th Sep 2019 at 09:39. Reason: Crossover in posting.
FlightlessParrot is offline  
Old 6th Sep 2019, 08:10
  #13 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2002
Location: CYYC (Calgary)
Posts: 4,830
I learn a lot of unexpected things on PPRuNe but refreshing my Latin grammar is most unexpected!
I don't remember much beyond declining "mensa" * , conjugating "amo", and stories about sailors, farmers and their daughters.

* I always wondered about the vocative case. I can't image anyone addressing a speech to a table, except perhaps Keats.
India Four Two is offline  
Old 6th Sep 2019, 09:05
  #14 (permalink)  
Gnome de PPRuNe
 
Join Date: Jan 2002
Location: Too close to Croydon for comfort
Age: 55
Posts: 5,696
[Drift]I have the merest smattering of Latin but I noticed a small Latin inscription above the door of a 1900s house in South Croydon. After a mental struggle I decided it translated loosely as "small house large welcome". [/Drift]
treadigraph is offline  
Old 6th Sep 2019, 09:51
  #15 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: UK
Posts: 3,672
The only little I recall is

semper in exretia, solum profundum variat
dook is offline  
Old 6th Sep 2019, 14:51
  #16 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2015
Location: Cincinnati, Ohio
Age: 70
Posts: 230
As well as Semper Ubi Sub Ubi.

- Ed
cavuman1 is offline  
Old 6th Sep 2019, 15:07
  #17 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 1999
Location: UK
Age: 72
Posts: 533
And ancient Roman graffiti:

Plus pecuniae minus laboris and Nolite vim adfere
Discorde is offline  
Old 6th Sep 2019, 15:32
  #18 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: UK
Posts: 3,672
The thread gets better...….
dook is offline  
Old 6th Sep 2019, 17:35
  #19 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
Location: Reading, UK
Posts: 10,598
Originally Posted by dook View Post
The only little I recall is

semper in exretia, solum profundum variat
Though I think you might have come across "Per Ardua Ad Astra" once or twice.
DaveReidUK is online now  
Old 6th Sep 2019, 17:46
  #20 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2017
Location: UK
Posts: 3,672
Just a few times yes.

I am sitting in my lounge beneath a family crest which states "Res Non Verba"
dook is offline  

Thread Tools
Search this Thread

Contact Us Archive Advertising Cookie Policy Privacy Statement Terms of Service

Copyright 2018 MH Sub I, LLC dba Internet Brands. All rights reserved. Use of this site indicates your consent to the Terms of Use.