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BEA and BOAC Cadet Pilots Hamble Brochures circa 1962

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BEA and BOAC Cadet Pilots Hamble Brochures circa 1962

Old 11th Feb 2019, 19:47
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BEA and BOAC Cadet Pilots Hamble Brochures circa 1962

I've been in the loft again and unearthed a brochure relating to the the BEA "Cadet Pilots Scheme"




and then I found the BOAC equivalent . Many more pages, and would you believe that at the age of 28 you might be earning £2000 per annum!! (page 3)









Unfortunately, I could not get the centre pages to upload. They are photographic pages, with "BOAC Headquarters in the centre, surrounded by photos of The Royal Family disembarking from a DH Comet, a Boeing 707, Alcock and Brown statue with DH Comet in the background, and a Bristol Britannia.
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Old 12th Feb 2019, 05:38
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DGAC,

This needs to go on the College of Air Training website. I have emailed the coordinator of this site suggesting that he contact you.

https://sites.google.com/site/collegeofairtraining/
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Old 12th Feb 2019, 08:21
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Thank you for the suggestion. I have heard from the coordinator and will be in touch with him later today.
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Old 12th Feb 2019, 09:36
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What does the contribution of £1,000 equate to in today’s money? I know that when I first started work in the 1960’s they talked of a £1,000 per year man as being pretty well off.

The salary range of £2 to £5K for qualified Pilot is an eye opener as well.
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Old 12th Feb 2019, 09:39
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That is a great find, thanks for sharing it! Interesting to see the same Chipmunk G-AMUC turning up, which is also shown on my site here: http://www.vc10.net/Memories/IFRcockpit.html (scroll down).
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Old 12th Feb 2019, 11:03
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I was hod carrying for that sort of money in the mid sixties. “the caring” corporations took the grand back after tax. My starting pay was around two grand gross in 1971..bit more than half of that net. £600 for an instructor rating at booker at corporations subsidised rates with the fabulous Joan Hughes.
But we had to do two years SO, two years AFO and then we got Dan Air starting pay. 79 I joined the Swiss leaving 7 year SFO pay..gross starting pay was double ..net around four times..couldn’t tell my mates as they wouldn’t believe it.
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Old 12th Feb 2019, 12:00
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Originally Posted by vctenderness View Post
What does the contribution of £1,000 equate to in today’s money?
Using an online inflation calculator, I came up with £1000 in 1962 is the equivalent of £20,932 in 2018.
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Old 12th Feb 2019, 17:16
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Originally Posted by Offchocks View Post
Using an online inflation calculator, I came up with £1000 in 1962 is the equivalent of £20,932 in 2018.
That's about right. The purchasing power of £1 today approximates to a shilling 60 years ago. Those of us who did the BEA/BOAC sponsored course for graduates at Kidlington were told that the cost of the training was approx £5000, of which we would repay £1000 over 5 years.

Interesting that the 707 in the BOAC pamphlet doesn't feature the 'D P Davies' mods - heightened fin (to improve directional stability and engine-out handling) and ventral fin (to prevent over-rotation on take-off). Is the photo a mock-up or a Boeing demonstrator in BOAC livery?

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Old 13th Feb 2019, 15:22
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Originally Posted by Offchocks View Post


Using an online inflation calculator, I came up with £1000 in 1962 is the equivalent of £20,932 in 2018.

So not as much a bargain as it looks at first glance!
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Old 13th Feb 2019, 17:59
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Originally Posted by Discorde View Post
Interesting that the 707 in the BOAC pamphlet doesn't feature the 'D P Davies' mods - heightened fin (to improve directional stability and engine-out handling) and ventral fin (to prevent over-rotation on take-off). Is the photo a mock-up or a Boeing demonstrator in BOAC livery?
It looks like a touched-up -320.

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Old 13th Feb 2019, 18:12
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BOAC didn't have -320s then.
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Old 13th Feb 2019, 19:27
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Originally Posted by Bergerie1 View Post
BOAC didn't have -320s then.
Yes, it's another airline's -320 with the livery touched up.
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Old 13th Feb 2019, 20:17
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-20 is the customer code for Boeing, BOAC used -36. BOAC did operate the -336 and the -436. According to Hansard the -336 were delivered in factory condition and were modified after flight test by the ARB. In the photo the engines do look like Conways, was this taken before DPD got his hands on it?

Last edited by tubby linton; 13th Feb 2019 at 22:46. Reason: speeling
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Old 13th Feb 2019, 20:45
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Originally Posted by tubby linton View Post
-20 is the customer code for Boeing, BOAC used -36. BOAC did operate the -336 and the -436. According to Hansard the -336 were delivered in factory condition and were modified after flight test by the ARB.
It would be more accurate to say that -320 (and -420) was the generic designation, with customer aircraft being delivered with the variant code specific to the operator.

In the same way that, for example, BA's 747-436s can also be (and are) correctly described as 747-400s.

I'm not sure if that gets us any further forward with identifying the touched up 707, if that's what it is. A big more digging suggests that it might in fact be a pre-delivery (pre-mod) -436 publicity photo, and there's a Flight photo from September 1959 that shows one in that condition prior to delivery to BOAC. That would fit with the vintage of the Hamble brochure.
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Old 13th Feb 2019, 20:55
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I disagree wholeheartedly with your first two paragraphs, especially with regard to how aircraft appear on the UK registers. There is nothing accurate about it.
Your notion is that of an amateur’s description.It also does not conform with the code used on flightplans.

Last edited by tubby linton; 13th Feb 2019 at 22:47.
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Old 13th Feb 2019, 21:22
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Originally Posted by tubby linton View Post
I disagree wholeheartedly with your first two paragraphs, especially with regard to the UK registers. Your notion is that of an amateur description.It also does not conform with the code used on flightplans
On the contrary, it conforms exactly to the code used on flightplans.

A Boeing 707-338C (for example those still flying with Omega Air) would be flightplanned as "B703", which decodes as "Boeing 707-300". ATC couldn't care less that "38" is Qantas's customer code, and I'd hardly describe them as "amateurs".

Likewise, any airline's 747-400s (say BA's 747-436s or Singapore's 747-412Fs) would be flightplanned as "B744" ("Boeing 747-400").

See https://www.icao.int/publications/do...s/default.aspx
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Old 13th Feb 2019, 21:30
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You don’t need to mansplain where the codes come from. I do know.You are alos contradicting your own earlier post. Keep underlining the reggies
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Old 13th Feb 2019, 21:57
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So what's your point ?

I have no idea what you are trying to argue.
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Old 13th Feb 2019, 22:12
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Pic of G-AMUH - DC-3 looming above the photographer?
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Old 13th Feb 2019, 22:42
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Originally Posted by treadigraph View Post
Pic of G-AMUH - DC-3 looming above the photographer?
It certainly looks like one.

Hard to tell whether it's at Hamble or the Chippie is on a cross-country somewhere.

Edit: Probably at Hamble - the College apparently had several DC-3s, presumably as ground instructional trainers.

Last edited by DaveReidUK; 13th Feb 2019 at 23:06.
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