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What Cockpit? MK V

Old 27th Nov 2006, 15:55
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Cringe.
Fiat G50 perhaps?
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Old 27th Nov 2006, 16:10
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Hi, Mel. Sorry, not a Fiat.
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Old 27th Nov 2006, 20:12
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Thanks. How about a Macchi MC.205V VELTRO?
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Old 28th Nov 2006, 06:46
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Sorry for the delay. Not a Macchi Veltro. This one is from the '30s.
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Old 28th Nov 2006, 09:28
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cringe
Italian 1930s? How about the Caproni A.P.1 Ground Attack aircraft?
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Old 28th Nov 2006, 09:47
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Not a Caproni. A few hundred were built.
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Old 28th Nov 2006, 11:46
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"Not a Caproni. A few hundred were built."

Not a Caproni or Fiat and I do not think it is a Macchi Aircraft. It is very similar to the IMAM Ro.44 but we have had that so perhaps it is the IMAM Ro.37 or 43.
Mel
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Old 28th Nov 2006, 12:29
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Mel, you have it with the Ro.37. Over to you.

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Old 28th Nov 2006, 17:18
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Thanks cringe.
I think the difference between the Ro.37 and Ro.43 was that the 43 was a float version of the 37.
I am sure this will not last long:

Mel
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Old 28th Nov 2006, 23:41
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A Caproni Ca 133?
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Old 29th Nov 2006, 09:10
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evansb

Sorry. Not the Caproni Ca 133.
Mel
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Old 29th Nov 2006, 18:09
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Savoia-Marchetti S.73?
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Old 29th Nov 2006, 21:33
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evansb

Not the Savoia-Marchetti S.73. However,you are in the right part of the world.
Mel
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Old 30th Nov 2006, 06:25
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I have no clue about the aircraft type, but I am intrigued by what look like Thermos flasks on the bulkhead behind both sets of rudder pedals. Could this aircraft have had glider-type variometers instead of the conventional "calibrated leak" VSI?
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Old 30th Nov 2006, 09:50
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India Four Two

You may well be correct.
This aircraft was designed in the 1930s.
As I understand it Variometers measure the rate of change of altitude by detecting the change in air pressure (static pressure) as altitude changes. As you say in its simplest form, the instrument consists of an air bottle connected to the external atmosphere through a sensitive air flow meter. As the aircraft changes altitude, the atmospheric pressure outside the aircraft changes and air flows into or out of the air bottle to equalise the pressure inside the bottle and outside the aircraft. The rate and direction of flowing air is measured and displayed to the pilot.
I understand that newer variometer designs directly measure the static pressure of the atmosphere using a pressure sensor and detect changes in altitude directly from the change in air pressure instead of by measuring air flow. These designs tend to be smaller as they do not need the air bottle.
The term "vertical speed indicator" or "VSI" is most often used for the instrument when it is installed in a powered aircraft as against the term variometer when used in a glider.
Mel
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Old 30th Nov 2006, 12:19
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Mel,

You give a good description of a glider vario, but until I saw your picture of the "unknown Italian job", I didn't think they were used in powered aircraft, because they are far too sensitive.

Mechanical glider varios have a light, spring-loaded vane, that is deflected by the air flow to or from the reservoir, giving a time constant (delay) of about 3 seconds.

All powered aircraft VSIs that I was previously aware of use the case of the instrument as the air reservoir and an ASI-type bellows to measure a pressure differential caused by a calibrated orifice. The time constant is much longer than 3 seconds, but I don't know how much.

A picture is worth a thousand words, so here's one: http://www.aeromech.usyd.edu.au/aero...ments/VSI.html

It's not quite the same as I remember from my UAS ground school days, but maybe my memory is fading.

So I am still interested to know if glider varios were commonly used in powered aircraft in the past - apart from glider towplanes.
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Old 1st Dec 2006, 14:07
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No takers?

Quite surprised that it has lasted this long. Evansb with his suggestions of Caproni Ca 133 and Savoia-Marchetti S.73 was correct in respect of nationality and era, also regarding the number of power-plants.
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Old 1st Dec 2006, 21:56
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Macchi C.100 flying boat?
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Old 2nd Dec 2006, 10:36
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evansb

Sorry about the delay, it is the Maachi C100. I am not sure if the cockpit windows were also behind the pilot's heads, if so it must have been quite an experience to see those three props spinning over one's shoulder.


You have control.
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Old 2nd Dec 2006, 18:13
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Here is my new post. Still waiting for a clue from Tim Inder on his photo..

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