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Virgin Australia Priority For Boarding

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Virgin Australia Priority For Boarding

Old 7th Nov 2018, 00:55
  #81 (permalink)  
 
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obviously in a war zone or combat situation, then OH&S goes out the window
Did I not say that at post #37?
No H & S rep ever seen on a battle front
When I said "absolutely no protection in the military" it was to mean when the military are doing what they exist for, combat. As for 99.9% time not in combat, I wish, and the current troops would be of the same opinion with the number of rotations they are required to perform.
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Old 7th Nov 2018, 06:40
  #82 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2008
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Originally Posted by Spotl View Post
As a Physically Disabled (Totally and Permanently Incapacitated – TPI) ex-Vietnam Veteran in my 70’s, I find Virgin’s offer to veterans to have priority boarding and an announcement onboard as an insult to the veteran community.

I normally board first in anycase as I’m disabled. Does this mean I’ll board in front of other disabled persons? It’s all a joke and publicity stunt to attract customers. Most veterans I know would prefer to keep their anonymity while boarding and as for an announcement on board that just adds to further embarrassment.

Maybe a discount (e.g. ID travel) would provide greater recognition for their service to Australia where veterans 'lay their lives on the line', instead of priority boarding and an announcement.

Maybe Qantas could look at my suggestion in acknowledging the operational service with some form of discount seeing the Minister for Veterans Affairs announced the initiative to have a ‘Veterans Card’ whereby companies could offer discounts to veterans?
Why not let veterans get off the plane first, it would be worth more as no one is going anywhere until after the last person on is seated.
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Old 7th Nov 2018, 06:52
  #83 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Professional Amateur View Post
Dr Dre, Same point as above. It’s a matter of law and the application of that law. You are correct, ‘no body signs up to the ADF to die’, they do however hand over the control of that choice to the Government. This is where the distinction lays.

Read my point again fellas: ‘When you sign up to the ADF the deal is that you no longer have a say when it comes to being placed in harms way. An emergency services person does not, when signing up make this same agreement, and whilst the numbers may be similar, their death whilst tragic was not part of the deal.
.
Well I'll say I disagree with that point, but you seem to be saying it's that point alone which determines that the military should be honoured or recognised more in our society above emergency services.

I could as easily say that the people in the military are already well rewarded via pay and benefits, in all cases they are paid while training whereas almost all civilians aren't (case in point pilots) and receive allowances when they are deployed. Therefore they already receive a much larger reward than one group who puts their lives on the line for us, emergency services volunteers. Volunteers do what they do for zero monetary reward (or in some circumstances very small allowances but nothing substantial).

Isn't that enough to place them in the highest league of those who are recognised in our society?

Last edited by dr dre; 7th Nov 2018 at 07:03.
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Old 7th Nov 2018, 08:58
  #84 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Sep 2015
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Originally Posted by dr dre View Post

I’ll bow out now, and say thank you for your service (to all, civil and military who’ve gone above and beyond for us all).
Perhaps you should have bowed out like you said you would at post 54. Was your application to join the military unsuccessful?
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Old 7th Nov 2018, 09:59
  #85 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by Cloudee View Post

Perhaps you should have bowed out like you said you would at post 54. Was your application to join the military unsuccessful?



I've never been inclined to join the military. I commented because I was told to delete my "mad raving" posts even though I was basically agreeing with what the Australian Defence Association said and what an ex Australian military officer wrote about it here. And it seems now Virgin as well, because due to the public backlash they have all but dropped this proposal.

Last edited by dr dre; 7th Nov 2018 at 10:25.
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Old 7th Nov 2018, 16:47
  #86 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by dr dre View Post
I've never been inclined to join the military.
Good, don't.
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Old 7th Nov 2018, 16:52
  #87 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
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Originally Posted by 5_mile_sniper View Post
No one has any problems with "Virgin flight XXX would like to welcome velocity rewards members to board first via the priority lane..." but VETERANS!!! howls of protest.
Perhaps that's because they DON'T say, that. They let Business Class and certain status Velocity members board early or in a separate line because they make a disproportionate contribution to the company's bottom line - they don't 'invite' velocity members to board separately just as Qantas don't invite frequent flyers, just Business, First, Platinum One, Platinum and Gold.
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Old 7th Nov 2018, 16:58
  #88 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2009
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Originally Posted by itsnotthatbloodyhard View Post



If you’d said ‘guilty of murdering locals’ I’d happily agree with you (except that then they’d hopefully be in prison and not boarding a 737). But ‘accused’? As far as I know, we still have something called ‘presumption of innocence’ here, and just being accused of something doesn’t automatically put you on the same moral level as a corrupt cop.
Well obviously I meant accused when they are found guilty. I support equality under the law.
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Old 7th Nov 2018, 18:48
  #89 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2013
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Unless you were conscripted, joining the military has always been voluntary and the risks known (as with many other mentioned civilian careers). This is just a publicity stunt and it's made virgin look very amateur.
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Old 8th Nov 2018, 01:41
  #90 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Feb 2008
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Originally Posted by dr dre View Post
Well I'll say I disagree with that point, but you seem to be saying it's that point alone which determines that the military should be honoured or recognised more in our society above emergency services.

I could as easily say that the people in the military are already well rewarded via pay and benefits, in all cases they are paid while training whereas almost all civilians aren't (case in point pilots) and receive allowances when they are deployed. Therefore they already receive a much larger reward than one group who puts their lives on the line for us, emergency services volunteers. Volunteers do what they do for zero monetary reward (or in some circumstances very small allowances but nothing substantial).

Isn't that enough to place them in the highest league of those who are recognised in our society?
I've always found this very interesting. I think you'll find that those who are commanding KC-30's and similar sized jets, flying in some pretty "interesting parts" of the world, staying in usually worse accommodation and for months at a time are earning considerably less than their commercial counterparts. China Southern certainly has recognised that fact and capitalised on it quite effectively! I can't comment on a lot of other trades as I don't have that much involvement with them, but I think you'll find that the average digger isn't exactly flush with coin.

I've also always been intrigued by the rare disdain I've seen in some of my GA mates when it comes to being paid to learn how to fly. Granted we aren't paying for it, but I'm yet to see any school in Australia that you are on a daily renewable contract with (maybe cadetships, I'm honestly not sure). Pilot's course was pretty brutal, we started with 18 and finished with 11. Given the context of how the ADF employs those skills they've invested time and money into giving you, I think it's a fair trade.
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Old 8th Nov 2018, 03:39
  #91 (permalink)  
 
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This thread says so much more about pilots, yet again, than it does about the proposal
Why do we as a group always find ways to belittle the contributions of others, rather than accepting a gift graciously and then pushing for more.
It never ceases to amaze me the attitude of those who, when they see imbalance, want to take from the better off, rather than work to bring everyone else up to the same standard.
It's a pretty easy argument to justify benefits for veterans, and importantly incredibly hard to argue against (in person that is, not on an anonymous forum). Once one group gets some sort of advantage/benefit it then becomes significantly easier to argue for that benefit to be extended to other worthy recipients. It's not rocket science, but we'd rather the short term satisfaction of cutting down a tall poppy than work together for the benefit of everyone in the long run.

CEO's must be laughing their tits off at us. We can find a way to create division from just about anything. Negotiating with pilots must be like taking candy from babies. Just throw out a divisive idea and wait for the shit fight to commence.



Did anyone notice that Ryanair Captains have knocked back 5000 pounds to work on a day off. Fat chance of that happening here as we'd race to undermine each other.
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Old 8th Nov 2018, 13:14
  #92 (permalink)  
 
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I've always found this very interesting. I think you'll find that those who are commanding KC-30's and similar sized jets, flying in some pretty "interesting parts" of the world, staying in usually worse accommodation and for months at a time are earning considerably less than their commercial counterparts.
I don't think it was implied they were. They do however earn whatever their employment contract that they agreed to sign says they earn. If it is not sufficient, or comes with some other unsavoury conditions, then they are free to leave as soon as their contract expires, which the vast majority seem to do.
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Old 8th Nov 2018, 20:44
  #93 (permalink)  
 
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I don’t think you understand the concept of ‘service’ to others. Members of the ADF do.
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Old 9th Nov 2018, 00:29
  #94 (permalink)  
 
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Granted we aren't paying for it, but I'm yet to see any school in Australia that you are on a daily renewable contract with (maybe cadetships, I'm honestly not sure). Pilot's course was pretty brutal, we started with 18 and finished with 11. Given the context of how the ADF employs those skills they've invested time and money into giving you, I think it's a fair trade.
Don't sell yourself short, dude.

You are paying for it in:
  • Return of Service Obligation;
  • many, many interstate moves;
  • higher risk at work (bullets);
  • non-negotiable conditions;
  • forced family separation;
  • steep and difficult learning curve during training, with a two strikes and you're out mentality;
  • route marches, putting up with the crap without recourse, having to respond "yes Sir" when some absolutely hopeless dipsh!t gives you a totally absurd secondary duty, etc, etc.
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Old 9th Nov 2018, 00:30
  #95 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
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...and your spouse and children are also paying for it in your many absences.

Last edited by benjam; 9th Nov 2018 at 00:31. Reason: syntax
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Old 9th Nov 2018, 03:36
  #96 (permalink)  
 
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benjam, no doubt things have changed since my time, pay was so low for some folks that they qualified for welfare (below poverty line I think was the issue), we payed into a superannuation fund but if you got out before retirement you got back exactly what you had paid in minus a handling charge - no interest earned. To top it off, if your family was in married quarters housing you had to get out if being sent into combat, you didn't requalify until you returned from your tour of combat. Oh, and you had to ask permission of the CO in order to get married, not a family friendly organisation was the military in my day.
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Old 9th Nov 2018, 05:17
  #97 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2008
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Nor in my time. That why it gets my goat when I hear that I received "free" training.
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Old 9th Nov 2018, 08:02
  #98 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2005
Location: QLD - where drivers are yet to realise that the left lane goes to their destination too.
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I don’t think you understand the concept of ‘service’ to others. Members of the ADF do.
At least until their Return Of Service obligation runs out.
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Old 9th Nov 2018, 08:28
  #99 (permalink)  
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I have found this thread to be somewhat 'interesting. Purely from the fact that some posters simply cannot pass up the opportunity to 'sink the boot in.' Feel free to apply your own interpretation of my observation. IDGAS!

However, as far as I'm concerned, a letter to the Editor in The Australian (in the 'last post' section, somewhat appropriately I would think!) on Thursday 8th November inst says it all....

My Father was a veteran and was always the first to board the aircraft and the last to disembark, but this was 1944, the airline was 466 Squadron, RAAF, the aircraft, a Halifax bomber and he was the pilot.
On his final trip, as usual he was the last out, but this time by parachute.
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Old 9th Nov 2018, 08:46
  #100 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jan 2014
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Good grief. As if we need more proof that the internet empowers idiots.I seriously wonder how the current generation would have responded in 1939.Perhaps the moderators on this site should just give up on the quality implied by the title "Professional" pilots network.Its getting embarrassing. Maybe about time to give up on this site entirely. Anybody out there able to recommend an alternative?
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