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Airbus eats Paperwork

Old 27th Feb 2018, 05:35
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Airbus eats Paperwork

Tasty.....
A GROUND crew member forced a mid-air diversion, after leaving a clipboard in the right engine of a Jetstar A320 plane flying between Auckland and Sydney.

The worker was inspecting the aircraft when he placed a clipboard containing paperwork inside one of the engines to protect it from the rain and wind — and then forgot all about it.

The plane was scheduled to fly between Auckland, New Zealand, and Sydney on October 27 when the incident occurred. It was already in the air by the time the captain was alerted to the situation by an Auckland air traffic controller, according to an Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) report.

“While preparing the aircraft for departure the leading hand placed a clipboard in the right engine which was subsequently ingested during start-up,” the ATSB report found.

“During the (subsequent) walk-around the dispatcher noticed the clipboard in the right engine but, believing it would be retrieved prior to the aircraft departing, the dispatcher did not notify the leading hand or supervisor of the foreign object debris as per company procedures.”

The Jetstar flight. Picture: Aerocare, modified by the ATSB
The Jetstar flight. Picture: Aerocare, modified by the ATSB
The captain was notified there was a problem after debris - the remains of the clipboard - was found on the runway after the plane had taken off.

Once notified, the captain scrambled, first checking the plane’s engine instruments and finding no abnormal indications. He then pressed flight control for more information, and was informed the clipboard had been placed in the inlet and that paper debris had been found on the tarmac.

The next step was to contact the company’s engineer at the airport, to find out if is was just paperwork or a clipboard containing a metal clip, and was told that a piece of sheared metal had been found.

Uncertain what damage had been done to the engine he made the decision to return to Auckland.

The aircraft was inspected and paper was found throughout the engine.

Minor damage was found to an engine fan blade and attrition liner, a part used to dampen noise that’s located on the inside of the engine.

A forgotten clipboard in a Jetstar plane engine caused the flight drama.
A forgotten clipboard in a Jetstar plane engine caused the flight drama.
The ATSB warned of the seriousness of such a situation, staying: “The presence of foreign object debris poses a significant threat to aircraft safety. It has the potential to cause aircraft damage during critical phases of flight, costing airlines and airports millions of dollars each year.

“This incident demonstrates the effect foreign object debris has on aircraft operations and emphasises the importance of not placing objects in aircraft engines. It further highlights that all staff operating near aircraft are responsible for reporting any non-normal events they encounter.

“It should not be assumed that others will perform a task where a hazard has been identified.”

The report also detailed how the captain faced several obstacles in trying to piece together exactly what was going on.

“The captain stated that, to obtain more information about the incident, numerous calls were made to other agencies, which took considerable time. Further, due to poor communications, he was unable to contact the operator’s maintenance controller to discuss the engine’s status.”

A Jetstar spokesperson told news.com.au its safety procedures have been updated following the incident.

“A plastic clipboard was inadvertently left on the engine cowl of a Jetstar A320 aircraft by our ground handler at Auckland Airport just prior to departure,” the spokesperson said.

“While this incident didn’t impact the safe operation of the aircraft, we take it very seriously. Since this occurred we have updated our procedures which includes a specific warning about not placing items in the engine cowling and improved detail around checks and responsibilities of the aircraft dispatch process.”
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Old 27th Feb 2018, 05:46
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Years ago a Pelair Westwind swallowed the TNT man's clipboard left on the wing. Bring another engine...
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Old 27th Feb 2018, 06:22
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I have read the ATSB report and have to say I am disappointed in the findings.
Not once does the report mention training, and the solution is to bark a bit louder at the employees , no mention of training whatsoever.
The Leading Hand placed the clipboard in the engine.....training ?
The dispatcher did a walk around and saw the clipboard but she thought it didn’t qualify as FOD as it was the aircrafts loading paperwork......training?
The problem wasn’t that the manuals had the wrong words in them, the problem is that the employees are ill equipped to hold the responsibility of their roles. That’s not their fault, they haven’t been trained properly because it costs too much.
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Old 27th Feb 2018, 06:42
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Is ground function outsourced?

The cornerstone of any Low Fare Airline...
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Old 27th Feb 2018, 09:14
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A novel way of shredding documents....
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Old 27th Feb 2018, 09:14
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Yes it is.
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Old 27th Feb 2018, 10:36
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How much training is needed to learn you don't use a jet engine intake as a desk??

Some common dog fxxk would go a long way but that's not that common any more it would seem.
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Old 27th Feb 2018, 10:49
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Originally Posted by Rated De View Post
Is ground function outsourced?
Of course it is. But it get’s worse than that, it’s outsourced to the lowest bidder. But that doesn’t seem to concern the ATSB.
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Old 27th Feb 2018, 13:01
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No doubt the culprit thought he was safe, wearing a hi-viz jacket. No doubt he needed ear protection after the event..
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Old 27th Feb 2018, 15:01
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Outsourcing ground functions is commonplace throughout the world, it’s certainly not just the domain of LCC’s. Qantas only really has its own ramp staff at major Australian airports. Even gate staff may be in Qantas uniforms but they are external contractors...it’s a sign of the times.
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Old 27th Feb 2018, 17:05
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Jetstar turns back

Forgetful ground staff
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Old 27th Feb 2018, 17:59
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During the (subsequent) walk-around the dispatcher noticed the clipboard in the right engine but, believing it would be retrieved prior to the aircraft departing
Goodness Me.
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Old 27th Feb 2018, 21:37
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Nice to see that the Captain "scrambled". I should think after landing, he probably boiled, and if he had found the culprit, that man would have been fried.
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Old 27th Feb 2018, 22:14
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Originally Posted by framer View Post
I have read the ATSB report and have to say I am disappointed in the findings.
Not once does the report mention training, and the solution is to bark a bit louder at the employees , no mention of training whatsoever.
The Leading Hand placed the clipboard in the engine.....training ?
The dispatcher did a walk around and saw the clipboard but she thought it didn’t qualify as FOD as it was the aircrafts loading paperwork......training?
The problem wasn’t that the manuals had the wrong words in them, the problem is that the employees are ill equipped to hold the responsibility of their roles. That’s not their fault, they haven’t been trained properly because it costs too much.
Completely agree. All the layers of OHS and risk management BS that companies force us to endure can't replace common sense. Abject failure of the training system - which always sucks the hind teat of the sow that aviation has become.
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Old 27th Feb 2018, 22:37
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How much training is needed to learn you don't use a jet engine intake as a desk??
Well, if you offer a low hourly rate and employ people who may or may not have experience in the aviation environment then you need to provide more training ( initial and ongoing) than if you pay more and get aviation folk who stick around the industry for decades and mentor their co-workers without even knowing it.
There is no free lunch.
My disappointment lay in the fact that the ATSB doesn’t have the courage to identify the real cause and is satisfied with supporting the way things are currently done even when safety is impacted. Or are the ATSB so inept now days that they believe what they wrote?
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Old 27th Feb 2018, 22:49
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Wonder how long before the clipboards will need to be made from the hi vis vest material with reflective racing stripes.
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Old 27th Feb 2018, 23:41
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Originally Posted by GA Driver View Post
Wonder how long before the clipboards will need to be made from the hi vis vest material with reflective racing stripes.

With a red ASIC
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Old 28th Feb 2018, 00:14
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From Pravda:

1. ATSB report – A report into a Sydney-bound Jetstar flight that returned to Auckland in October last year has been released. The aircraft returned after a clipboard was ingested into one of the A320’s engines. The report by the Australian Transport Safety Bureau (ATSB) found the plastic clipboard was inadvertently left on the aircraft’s engine cowl by the ground handler at Auckland Airport just prior to departure. The incident did not impact the safe operation of the flight, and procedures have since been updated to include a specific warning about placing items in the engine cowling.
Well, that fixes everything.
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Old 28th Feb 2018, 01:23
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Excellent news. They can put stuff in the pack inlets instead.

If it’s the same mob we use in Auckland, then they come across as more of a mature-age work experience program.
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Old 28th Feb 2018, 03:00
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Originally Posted by GA Driver View Post
Wonder how long before the clipboards will need to be made from the hi vis vest material with reflective racing stripes.
Perhaps a warning label on the clipboard: "Do not place inside engine!"
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