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Melbourne Airport: 737 cargo hold fire poss due to Lithium-ion battery

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Melbourne Airport: 737 cargo hold fire poss due to Lithium-ion battery

Old 28th Apr 2014, 05:27
  #21 (permalink)  
 
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I have an Ipad and an HTC mobile phone. Neither has a removeable battery. I suspect both are lithium technology, but I don't know. In general, I understand there is more concern about loose batteries than connected ones for obvious reasons - bare terminals. However, security never comments on the spare lithium batteries I carry for my camera.
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Old 28th Apr 2014, 05:38
  #22 (permalink)  
 
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Last I heard was it was an rc helicopter battery

But I'm not at work for a while so I can't ask around

I wasn't there, but a mate was on, apparently smoke was reported, then a mayday call made

If it were an Aussie airline it'd be front page news for weeks
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Old 28th Apr 2014, 06:12
  #23 (permalink)  
 
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Halon basically works by displacing the oxygen that is feeding the fire - and won't work when the material that is burning can provide its own oxidizer. Li-O batteries fall into that category, along with things like ammonium perchlorate (used to make solid rocket propellant), gunpowder, and oxygen generation canisters. Once ignited, they will continue to burn until the fuel is exhausted....
In the case of a small, single battery (e.g. laptop), Halon can keep the fire from spreading while the original source burns itself out.
Much was made in the ValuJet crash that the cargo hold did not have a fire suppression system - totally missing the point that it wouldn't have mattered - once the oxygen generators started burning, that airplane was doomed.
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Old 28th Apr 2014, 06:13
  #24 (permalink)  
 
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Last I heard was it was an rc helicopter battery
I have an RC helicopter. The batteries and charger come with very comprehensive instructions and warnings. A lot of energy packed in a small space, but with a pigtail connector rather than exposed terminals.
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Old 28th Apr 2014, 07:08
  #25 (permalink)  
 
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I still find it amazing that the media didn't jump,all over this story like a cheap suit.

Smoking bags being pulled from the hold, Mayday calls, RFF spraying water for 15 mins etc

Surely this is not "normal" for Mel Airport and is as good a story as "Qantas 767 is death defying missed approach......"

One more thing, the 737 doesn't have cargo fire detection or suppression does it?
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Old 28th Apr 2014, 07:22
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If this is a case of RC Heli, it would fit in with a few factors, including the hardcase. As some of you may know LiPo batteries are the main type used to get that kind of power for weight/size.


The main issue with LiPos, is battery damage, and not so much shorting of connectors, due to the types of connectors used. Battery damage is quite easy due to them being soft shell batteries. Damage can be present from small crashes which may cause no obvious signs of damage at the time, but bloating etc can lead to spontaneous type combustion later in the batteries life. The type of batteries I use are usually 2 x 6 cell 22.2v 5000-6000mAh in series.


LiPos are to be charged only while you are present (I'd prefer on concrete away from anything flammable, and kept in fireproof lipo bags.. and yes, submersing a damage battery in water is a safe way to go.


There are plenty of videos online of LiPo explosions, from damaged.. deliberately or not.. batteries. I hope this adds to someone's understanding and/or appreciation of them.
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Old 28th Apr 2014, 07:34
  #27 (permalink)  
 
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Andrewgr2 has raised a good point. I wonder how many pax are 100% familiar with the fine details of the listed DG's? - such as NO spare batteries of ANY kind, in checked baggage? - and that each battery needs to be individually protected to prevent short circuits?

Dangerous Goods | Qantas

I have never been questioned by any security people, with specific regard to batteries, in any of my luggage presented.

I was quite surprised when a young bloke on security specifically questioned me on aerosols in my carry-on luggage, at BNE just last week.
That's the first time I have ever been asked with regard to aerosols, and it should be mandatory to question every passenger as regards the more dangerous items, that are often thoughtlessly included in luggage - such as aerosols and batteries.

I've commenced using a small plastic parts box with dividers and a hinged lid with a catch, to carry items such as spare batteries, and other electronic necessities. I've found it works well.

https://www.masters.com.au/product/9...12-compartmemt
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Old 28th Apr 2014, 07:45
  #28 (permalink)  
 
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One Track

I agree with you, I don't think I have ever been asked apart from the general question re DG goods (and I have flown with the lower two quite often so am aware of what is on the list)

I have also been asked specifically about Aerosols before, both before an international flight to the US and a internal flight in Aus.

Those plastic hinged boxes for batteries are by far the best available
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Old 28th Apr 2014, 08:00
  #29 (permalink)  
 
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this is pretty common, im sure the check in agents rarely ask though


"All spare batteries, including lithium metal or lithium ion cells or batteries, for such consumer electronic devices must be carried in carry-on baggage only. These batteries must be individually protected to prevent short circuits."



thinking i shouldn't leave my quadcopter and gear sitting in the car from now on..
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Old 28th Apr 2014, 08:21
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Does security check for batteries when they x ray the checked bags?
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Old 28th Apr 2014, 08:52
  #31 (permalink)  
 
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Sometimes cases can have a hard time in baggage handling, or just sitting around in high temps on concrete or on tarmac.

I wonder if the hard shell black case in this instance was labelled, "Fragile", "Contains Inflammable Batteries", (or "Flammable" for those that do not understand the meaning of inflammable), "Do Not Drop", "Do Not Expose to Direct Sunlight", etc.?
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Old 28th Apr 2014, 09:50
  #32 (permalink)  
 
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Does anyone have a personal experience of this? I will put an electric golf trolley in a suitcase, therefore in the hold. I plan to take the lithium battery in my hand luggage, as per the carriers instructions about Li-batteries. Has anyone had a problem with this?
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Old 28th Apr 2014, 10:49
  #33 (permalink)  
1DC
 
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I consider myself a seasoned and experienced traveller but a couple of months ago i put my laptop in my checked baggage because i wasn't going to use it and couldn't be bothered to carry it in my hand baggage, get it out at security etc.. It never occurred to me to take the battery out, but it will now if i ever do it again....
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Old 28th Apr 2014, 11:20
  #34 (permalink)  
 
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Originally Posted by onetrack View Post
I wonder how many pax are 100% familiar with the fine details of the listed DG's? - such as NO spare batteries of ANY kind, in checked baggage? - and that each battery needs to be individually protected to prevent short circuits?

Dangerous Goods | Qantas
not quite - from your link

Spare lithium ion batteries with a Watt-hour rating exceeding 100Wh but not exceeding 160Wh for consumer electronic devices. Maximum of two spare batteries may be carried in carry-on baggage only.
So below 100Wh is no problem anywhere. Checked in or carry on.
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Old 28th Apr 2014, 13:16
  #35 (permalink)  
 
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Very recently flew Singapore Airlines to SIN then BKK ex BNE. We're specifically asked about batteries in checked bags at BNE and SIN, but not at BKK
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Old 28th Apr 2014, 17:04
  #36 (permalink)  
 
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I have been told at check in at Belfast that as my carry on exceeded their weight limit that my laptop had to go in the check in baggage, batteries not mentioned. This is a company work laptop and is somewhat heavier than the normal.
Result of this was that the airline is now on the company no fly list.
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Old 28th Apr 2014, 21:57
  #37 (permalink)  
 
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Did any investigation determine that a battery of any type was involved?
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Old 28th Apr 2014, 22:27
  #38 (permalink)  
 
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One more thing, the 737 doesn't have cargo fire detection or suppression does it?

Nit picker, some do some don't, depends on your operation.

I think all have detection. Suppression is a customer option which obviously costs money. Draw your own conclusions.
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Old 29th Apr 2014, 00:38
  #39 (permalink)  
 
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Laptop Battery

1DC
i put my laptop in my checked baggage because i wasn't going to use it and couldn't be bothered to carry it in my hand baggage, get it out at security etc.. It never occurred to me to take the battery out, but it will now if i ever do it again....
It would be a good idea to also wrap some insulation (duct tape) around the removed battery terminals too.
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Old 29th Apr 2014, 02:01
  #40 (permalink)  
 
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Another

A media crew working for a US cable network had a lucky escape when the battery on their Octocopter caught fire last month at Dubai airport.

The smoking case was pulled out of the baggage bin on the ground by baggage handlers, before it was loaded onto the connecting flight.

Some of the octocopter/drone crews are fairly new to the TV business.

Last edited by mickjoebill; 30th Apr 2014 at 07:18.
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