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Truss: Aviation Safety Regulation Review

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Truss: Aviation Safety Regulation Review

Old 23rd Jul 2014, 09:58
  #941 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2013
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it might take a year when the cause of the prang is not known.
ffs we know what caused the accident.
a perfectly serviceable Boeing 777 was shot down by a rebel fired BUK missile.

The shamans of safety obviously haven't realised just what fools they all look.
what would set it all off is a richly tapestried pointy hat and a smoking brazier on a gold chain. they could make a really good show of blowing smoke over everyone. what a pack of fckuwits.
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Old 23rd Jul 2014, 10:12
  #942 (permalink)  
 
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Agree, and Beaker an "investigator". What a joke. He should be dumped by Wuss just for that. Assumed designation is a serious breach in the Public Service arena. Besides that the Senate have already "outed" him, he continues to put on the show. Does he not realise that the industry, and Senate are laughing at him????
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Old 23rd Jul 2014, 11:28
  #943 (permalink)  
 
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what would set it all off is a richly tapestried pointy hat and a smoking brazier on a gold chain. they could make a really good show of blowing smoke over everyone.
Why drag the Screaming Skull in to this??
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Old 23rd Jul 2014, 13:29
  #944 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
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According to Flight the Dutch authorities are to lead.

MH17: Dutch authority takes over as lead investigator - 7/23/2014 - Flight Global

MH17: Dutch authority takes over as lead investigator
By: DAVID KAMINSKI-MORROWLONDON Source: 4 hours ago
Dutch investigators are to assume the lead role in the inquiry into the loss of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 over Ukraine.

Under normal protocols the state of incident would normally head the investigation. MH17 came down in eastern Ukraine, near the Russian border.

But Ukraine’s accident investigation authority, the NBAAI, says it has prepared an agreement to “transfer” the inquiry to its counterpart in the Netherlands, the Dutch Safety Board.

Ukrainian representatives will have the right to participate, it adds.

The Dutch Safety Board confirms the handover of the investigation. Most of the 298 occupants of the Malaysian Boeing 777-200 were Dutch nationals.

Investigators are working on collecting and analysing data from various sources, says the Dutch Safety Board, even though secure access to the crash site has yet to be ensured.

"It is not possible for the investigators to visit safely," it states. It adds that, while the crash site has been disturbed, it expects to collect sufficient information for the inquiry.

Transfer of authority, it says, will give the international inquiry team, comprising 24 investigators, "more space" to co-ordinate its activities.

Both the cockpit-voice and flight-data recorders have been handed to the UK Air Accidents Investigation Branch in Farnborough, which confirms it has received them from the Dutch authority.

The Dutch Safety Board says the analysis of the recorders is a "priority" but that this might take several weeks to complete.

In parallel with the international MH17 inquiry the authority will also carry out an investigation into related aspects, focused on decision-making on air routes as well as passenger list availability.

I expect Professor Patrick Hudson to be involved in this with his links to Dutch CAA and ICAO.

004, I don't think 'beyond reason' will get a look in but James Reason is odds on.

Last edited by halfmanhalfbiscuit; 23rd Jul 2014 at 22:00. Reason: Missed a link
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Old 24th Jul 2014, 05:04
  #945 (permalink)  
 
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Just spoken with Manning. Says he definitely hasn't either applied for or been asked to apply for the DAS or any other position. Says he's way too old for it.
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Old 24th Jul 2014, 07:09
  #946 (permalink)  
 
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The BIG BOYS butting heads...TICK TOCK miniscule

Interesting article today from the Oz...
Too close for comfort

THE pilots of the Virgin Australia Boeing 737 with more than 100 passengers on board heard the collision alarm go off moments before they saw the business jet flash before them.
They had just taken off from Newcastle airport, climbing to 5000 feet (1524m), but the pilots were unaware that a business jet coming in to land had just been granted permission by military air traffic controllers to descend to 5000 feet.

Both jets were being handled by separate air traffic controllers as they hurtled towards one another, but these controllers were not communicating with each other — resulting, in the words of investigators, “in both aircraft being assigned the same level (altitude) and with conflicting tracks (flight paths)”. To make matters worse, an automated near-miss alert function on the controllers’ screens had been deactivated because, with military aircraft in formation also using the airport, it had set off too many false alarms.

It was only the anti-collision warning in the cockpit that led the Virgin Australia crew to take evasive action, and both jets passed with only 112m vertical separation and 1300m horizontally — one-third of the minimum safe clearance levels.

In March 2012, when the Australian Transport Safety Bureau delivered its report into this February 2011 incident, it was scathing of the training and procedures used by air force air traffic controllers at Newcastle airport.

“Overall the controllers did not resolve the situation effectively, and this was due at least in part to the Department of Defence not providing its air traffic controllers with compromised separation recovery training.”

What’s more, the ATSB noted there had been no fewer than nine so-called “breakdowns of separation’’ of aircraft at Newcastle airport in the previous 18 months.

What was going on?

Last October, when the ATSB examined the nat­ional pattern of so-called loss of separation incidents, it came to a disturbing conclusion. Three major airports in Australia that were run by military air traffic controllers had a poorer safety record than their civilian counterparts. Put simply, Newcastle, Darwin and Townsville — each of which is run by military ATCs because of their proximity to air force bases — had more LOS incidents, where passenger planes pass too close together, increasing the risk of midair collisions.

The ATSB report found that between 2008 and 2012 military controllers were involved in 36 per cent of all LOS incidents, despite controlling only 25 per cent of air traffic near terminals.

“This ATSB investigation concluded that civilian aircraft have a disproportionate rate of LOS incidents which leads to a higher risk of collision in military terminal airspace in general and all airspace around Darwin and Williamtown (Newcastle) in particular,” the ATSB said.
It was a damning finding and one quietly supported by some ­pilots of passenger planes using these military-controlled airports, who tell The Australian they have observed discrepancies in the handling of planes compared with civilian-controlled airports.

But when the ATSB’s findings came out, it was clear the agency had stepped on some powerful toes. Defence fired back saying it simply did not accept the ATSB’s findings and claimed that LOS incidents were not an accurate indicator of safety levels. The air safety regulator, the Civil Aviation Safety Authority, also challenged the report, saying that while it did not have oversight authority over Defence ATCs, it had a close relationship with Defence that the ATSB “fails to acknowledge”.

Perhaps this internal squabble over safety is why the Coalition government appears to have all but ignored the report and its implications for the safety of travelling Australians.

Which is why during the past week key aviation figures have spoken out in frustration, demanding the government set up an inquiry into Australia’s ATC system and review whether it remains a good idea for military air traffic controllers to direct passenger jets at Australian airports.

Former Qantas chief pilot Chris Manning says while the three main airports operated by military ATCs are not unsafe, they are clearly less safe that the country’s other major airports.

“It is safe, but according to the ATSB report there are more incidents per (flight) movement in military airspace,” he tells The Australian. “There should be no difference in the level of safety at all towered aerodromes.”
Manning’s call for an independent inquiry into these safety issues carries weight. As a veteran pilot, and chief Qantas pilot from 2003 to 2008, he is well regarded in the industry. He has previously lauded Australia’s aviation safety record and, when Tiger Airways was facing safety issues in 2011, the airline turned to him for advice.

Manning says it is time the regulations were changed to allow CASA to have formal oversight of military air traffic controllers. “I would much prefer to see one standard that was audited by CASA throughout Australia,” he says.

Paul Tyrrell, head of the Regional Aviation Association of Australia, is concerned there does not appear to have been any robust response to such findings. “The ATSB report was a serious report but regional airline operators haven’t seen any serious response from the military or the government, so we would ask the question, what will their response be?”

The acting chief of Air Force, Air Vice-Marshal Leo Davies, says he fundamentally disagrees with the implication in the ATSB report that military air traffic controllers are less safe than civilian ones.

“We (RAAF) control a couple of hundred thousand civil flights each year and we do that safely,” Davies says. “If I felt there was something that required immediate attention I would address that. I am a military aviator myself, I have flown in civil and military airspace in Australia, and I have no concerns with Australian military air traffic control standards.”

Former CASA chairman and aviation safety activist Dick Smith has also joined the fray, writing to Defence Minister David Johnston and Infrastructure Minister Warren Truss.

“Minister, this is a shocker,” Smith wrote to Johnston. “I am sure you do not want to be responsible for the first jet airline fatalities in Australia’s history.

“After 30 years of experience in our civil aviation industry, my view is that the military simply do not have the efficiencies of scale to be able to adequately operate an acceptably safe air traffic system for civilian aircraft.
“They also have a real problem with change; that is, it is obvious they find it nearly impossible to move forward and follow the very latest safety procedure and airspace classifications in the world.”

That civilian and military air traffic controllers direct passenger aircraft in Australia is a quirk of history, reflecting the fact airports in some locations were shared by civilian and military planes. The military planes needed military ATCs so it was decided they might as well ­direct civilian planes also.

Defence has about 250 controllers looking after its 11 air bases, but in Newcastle, Townsville and Darwin these controllers also direct civilian planes, including large passenger jets, some operated by Virgin Australian and Jetstar. Military controllers operate completely different computer systems to their civilian counterparts and have different skills because their jobs go beyond just directing civilian aircraft.

Defence makes the brazen arg­ument that military airspace at these airports is tight and less predictable so it should not be judged using the same safety criteria as civilian airports.

“Defence does not agree with an implication that the number of LOS per number of aircraft movements directly correlates to safety,” a Defence spokesman tells The Australian. “Military-controlled airspace is inherently different to civilian-controlled airspace — with high traffic peaks but low overall aircraft movement statistics, diverse aircraft types and constrained airspace — which makes the statistical comparison flawed.”

Smith says this is cold comfort for civilian passengers and is not good enough when Australian aircraft movements are forecast to grow by 60 per cent across the next 20 years.

“The concern about military airspace is that the procedures and airspace classification have not been updated for many decades, and what might have been OK in 1950 can’t be accepted now because aircraft move much faster and carry more people,” he says.

Smith emphasises he is not criticising the abilities of military ATCs, just the system and procedures under which they operate.

“You simply have to have the most experienced controllers guiding passenger jets and there is no way that the small number of military controllers can get that level of experience and training.”

Defence maintains that its controllers “have common qualifications and apply the same standards and procedures”, saying while CASA does not have oversight of military ATCs, CASA has a significant input into Defence’s safety policies.

But the ATSB says this is not enough.

“A reliance on Defence sharing the same operations manual as (the civilian ATC operators) Airservices and internal auditing and oversight, including involvement, guidance and advice by CASA, will not guarantee an equivalent level of safety is provided to civilian aircraft operating in and out of Defence-operated aerodromes as for civilian aerodromes,” the ATSB says.

Most disturbing is the ATSB’s belief that the closed nature of Defence is not allowing proper scrutiny of its safety levels, despite the fact the safety of civilian passengers is at stake.

“At present there is no comprehensive and independent assessment of the levels of safety and compliance with respect to civil aircraft operations at these airports and no transparency for industry in respect to any differences in the levels of service provided or safety afforded.”

Although Defence was angered by the ATSB report and does not agree with its key findings, it is now reviewing its traffic management plans at Darwin, Townsville and Williamtown to improve its techniques for separating aircraft.

It also has stepped up training for its controllers on how to recover from an LOS situation.

CASA was also hostile to the ATSB report, believing it to be an attack on CASA’s own dealings with Defence, but it has since initiated a joint safety study of Newcastle airport due for release later this year.

Smith says these measures are too little, too late, and that if there were a mid-air accident at any of these airports today the government would have blood on its hands for failing to act despite receiving ample warning.

Smith wants a new system whereby military air traffic controllers are responsible only for military aircraft while civilians ATCs are responsible for civilian aircraft. He points out that former Defence chief Angus Houston said in 2002: “Australia simply cannot justify, sustain or afford to continue operating two almost identical air traffic management systems.”

Both military and civilian ATCs will use the same systems by 2020 under a plan called OneSKY but there is no plan at present to limit military controllers to military aircraft.

Former Qantas chief pilot Manning simply wants an independent inquiry to reassess the manner in which Australia man­ages its airspace to ensure it is as safe as it can be. “My suggestion would be to have a panel of three to review the ATSB report and have a real look at the airspace requirements of the military as well as civil so that both can be accommodated as efficiently as possible,” he says.

“The panel might say the current system is the best, although somehow I doubt it.”
Battlelines being defined, popcorn & beer stocked up 'let the games begin!'

Also noted the following from Dougy's weekly insight...

"...Last night I attended the annual Sir Hudson Fysh lecture and dinner in Brisbane at the invitation of the Queensland branch of the Royal Aeronautical Society. The guest lecturer was David Forsyth, the chairman of the recent Aviation Safety Regulatory Review panel. It was a stellar turnout with Industry very well represented at the event. Congratulations to Cam McPhee and his team for organizing it all and for garnering such significant industry involvement.

The obvious themes to emerge from the lecture and the subsequent Q&A were industry’s satisfaction with the ASRR report itself and a growing sense of frustration that nothing has been done about any of it yet. The fact that there are still two members to be appointed to the CASA board and that we are no closer to an appointment of a new DAS is a high-profile element of the discontent. There was even talk of a high-level march on the Minister’s office to drill home the sense of frustration. The Minister should be advised that the people talking such talk are not industry lightweights.

It also appears that new Deputy Chair of the CASA board, Jeff Boyd, has not yet had an invitation to catch up with re-appointed (for the time being) Chairman Allan Hawke. Let’s hope board functionality gets better than that before there are serious matters to discuss..."

TICK...TOCK miniscule...

Oh and RED can you get your muppet to release that TSBC report...

MTF..
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Old 24th Jul 2014, 10:59
  #947 (permalink)  
 
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Uh oh, are we close to the 'end game'?

The obvious themes to emerge from the lecture and the subsequent Q&A were industry’s satisfaction with the ASRR report itself and a growing sense of frustration that nothing has been done about any of it yet. The fact that there are still two members to be appointed to the CASA board and that we are no closer to an appointment of a new DAS is a high-profile element of the discontent. There was even talk of a high-level march on the Minister’s office to drill home the sense of frustration. The Minister should be advised that the people talking such talk are not industry lightweights.
Oh me oh my, it seems that some of the IOS more 'heavy weights' have lost their ever ebbing patience as the industry plateaus at probably its lowest point in history! We have an obsfucating Miniscule whose only interest in aviation is the QF Chairmans lounge and having cucumber sandwiches with Joyce. Then you have the re-appointed Pumpkin Head who is synonymous with doing SFA. Add to this you have the bloated Chairman Hawke reappointed to the CAsA Board, and you have Beaker reappointed to the ATsB for 2 more years. What a clusterf#ck!!!! Sarcs, definitely time to stack the fridge, fill the cupboards and pick a comfy armchair as the show is beginning shortly

Also;

It also appears that new Deputy Chair of the CASA board, Jeff Boyd, has not yet had an invitation to catch up with re-appointed (for the time being) Chairman Allan Hawke. Let’s hope board functionality gets better than that before there are serious matters to discuss..."
If this little gem is true, then Houston we have a huge problem. I would speculate that Herr Hawke wanted another lapdog appointed to the Board, not someone with a measure of decency. Is it possible that Boyd can't or won't be moulded by Herr Hawke, hence the frosty reception? Or are we reading into this, maybe the Chairman was busy consuming yet another taxpayer funded lavish meal, or he was wake boarding through a giant trough, or maybe he was getting some updated business cards made up and he was ensuring that all the spiffy letters that follow his name were all correct?? "Sorry Jeff, tis been a busy week".

It is very obvious to most that the depth of our aviation disaster is deeper than most previously thought. It is obvious that the Miniscule, and his Master, Slugger Abbott, have another political shit storm forming above the Can'tberra hills! The ball of twine is unwinding rapidly and these nimrods have no idea how to fix things, even though the IOS which includes all level of industry, some good Senators, and even the good people in these government agencies are yelling out that the Titanics final song 'Autumn' is currently playing!

TICK TOCK
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Old 24th Jul 2014, 19:23
  #948 (permalink)  
 
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A very quick scan of Dr. Hawkes entry on Wikipedia suggests to me that he is a very experienced "safe pair of hands", a Mandarins mandarin, to put it another way, with long experience of cleaning out Augean stables.

I fail to understand why he has allowed CASA to deteriorate, in the industry's perception at least, to the point where he has had to cop the Truss review findings, it must be a shock to his system, assuming he is not a raving narcissist who rejects the entire review findings, which I doubt.

The question I would expect the Minister is still asking is exactly who wants to be part of the team to clean up this mess and if they have the qualifications for the job? No one who can read between the lines would underestimate the amount of work and risk to individual careers that the DAS role or a Board appointment would entail.

Even if the Board and DAS earnestly apply themselves to reform, they commit career suicide if there is a major accident before:

(a) A favourable FAA/ICAO review is achieved.

(b) Industry metrics show acceptable performance (note: I don't believe CASA or ASA have even signed up to any international benchmarking process).

(c) Regulatory reform is in place and hitting demonstrable targets.

(d) Industry surveys show an indisputably significant increase in the strength of relationships with the regulator.

...and (e) Ahem, regular favourable comment on PPRuNe and the more distinguished parts of the aviation press.

There are probably another half dozen outcomes to be added to this list.

Dr. Hawke? I expect he is stuck with the Chairmanship until it pleases the Minister to release him.

To put that another way, I think the Minister is still looking for candidates who are game to clean up the place and perhaps finding there aren't many takers.
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Old 24th Jul 2014, 20:56
  #949 (permalink)  
 
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What time is it?

It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us, we were all going direct to Heaven, we were all going direct the other way – in short, the period was so far like the present period, that some of its noisiest authorities insisted on its being received, for good or for evil, in the superlative degree of comparison only. (Boz – A tale of two cities).
It's been a busy week for the IOS, what with one thing and the other. Spoiled for choice – Joyce. Now I know the minuscule is only vaguely aware that we do have aircraft now in Australia also that they are a long way down his list of priorities and apart from winning the Qld elections, time for trivial matters is hard to find. Perhaps some one could check to make sure he still has a pulse then gently waft some paperwork in his direction and get it signed before the medication wears off. He is going to need to stay awake at least long enough to be briefed on the little bombshell ticking away in the Senate.

There are three (in total) Matters of Privilege before the committee. No one knows who or what is involved, clues are hard to find, information even harder. This is unfair of course, the public service has a duty to leak, but, alas, not this time. There are a few well founded speculative arguments, my personal choice is the tricky business with the Pel Air inquiry, which drags White and Chambers into the funny coloured light of the MoU, unsigned NCN, the gross insults to Ben Cook and Mal Christie which led to resignation. Couple of bright, highly qualified, skilled, dedicated honourable men cannot tolerate or be associated with an aberration such as CAIR 09/3 and other 'manipulated' documents. If the Senate have uncovered any sort of skulduggery, there'll be hell to pay and ferry fares to find.

ATSB cop a straight right from the Air Force Chief, not entirely a surprise, considering the ATSB 'report'. For an outfit determined not to lay blame, point the bone or take any sort of stand; they have certainly ruffled the RAAF feathers. Makes you wonder though; I mean if they are going to 'come out' and start shouting the odds, they could have picked a slightly less prickly target. Beyond all Reason strikes again.

Then the ATSB appear again, the picture Sarcs posted is priceless. Beaker looks like a Beagle puppy, caught pissing on the mat; the other two with 1000 yard stares, desperately trying to disassociate. Why would you blame them, the chance to escape from the apron strings, do some real work and generate 'factual' reports, which people will appreciate is why these two highly qualified men are in their field. Real investigation, real reports and a chance to use their not inconsiderable skills. Bonus, no Beaker and a chance to work with real agencies, with teeth and muscles.

We have Boyd, doing his policeman at Herne Bay imitation. On his Pat Malone, awaiting his summons to the high table. If the murky Machiavellians have their way, the expression don't take a knife to a gun fight, will take on new significance for Boyd. 5-1 is the expected score line and if the DAS is the 'right stuff' it will be 6-1. We will have to wait (again) to see how much 'management' the miniscule is going to allow in stacking the board. Boyd could of course go see the miniscule, bang on table to wake him up and like Oliver, ask for more. Cup of tea, chocolate Monte, lots of nodding and smiling, warm handshake and out the door a.s.a.p. Once the door is closed, the minders move in and the hypnotic, will sapping whispering begins again.

Last, but by no means least – the CVD tribe – who's woes are set to continue, unabated. Seems McComic is determined to continue his assault on the industry he loathes until the last minute. Driven by only the gods know what and terrified of 'liability' issues (not medical but legal it seems), he continues to use his willing accomplice to present the 'real' issues. The fact that Pooshams tenuous hold on any sort of reputation will be totally destroyed; whichever way it turns out is of no importance to the 49'ers Nemesis. I doubt the PMO can see past his well flattered ego and work this out. Word on the street is some of the McComic acolytes already carry 'show cause' notices and are facing a 'grim' future, banished from the Sleepy Hollow sheltered workshops; perhaps the PMO can join them, maybe they will care about his woes...

Aye; I'd like to think Karma was real and active. Anyone got her number?, someone should ring and tell her there's real work to be done in the sun burnt country, lots of it.

Selah.

Whistles up dogs and happily goes vermin hunting. Bats in the belfry, rats in the barn and bloody rabbits – everywhere..._._

Last edited by Kharon; 24th Jul 2014 at 22:09. Reason: 2 nd coffee edit..
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Old 25th Jul 2014, 02:32
  #950 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Apr 2007
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Side profile of the miniscule.

Kharon:
It's been a busy week for the IOS, what with one thing and the other. Spoiled for choice – Joyce. Now I know the minuscule is only vaguely aware that we do have aircraft now in Australia also that they are a long way down his list of priorities and apart from winning the Qld elections, time for trivial matters is hard to find. Perhaps some one could check to make sure he still has a pulse then gently waft some paperwork in his direction and get it signed before the medication wears off. He is going to need to stay awake at least long enough to be briefed on the little bombshell ticking away in the Senate.
Also spoilt for choice on your post "K"... Hmm..but let us start with the miniscule's recent OBs.

Warning: The following pic may cause unpredictable, adverse, physical and/or psychological side effects.

Sometimes (much like the photo of Beaker and his boys ) a picture is worth a thousand words...


Deputy Prime Minister Warren Truss this week. Source: Getty Images

Despite the fact that the miniscule has been sighted this week upright (& presumably with a pulse) doesn't he have an uncanny resemblance to Blinky Bill...

This photo accompanied an article from SC at the Oz, which more than proves that not only does the DPM have a pulse but he is also very much aware of the growing number of Boardroom & aviation elephants in the room..:
New faces at CASA, Airservices

A SEARCH for a suitable replacement for outgoing Civil Aviation Safety Authority head John McCormick still has “some time to run,’’ according to Deputy Prime Minister Warren Truss.
A recruitment company is putting together a short list of candidates for interview by a panel of CASA board members and the head of the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development Mike Mrdak.

Some aviation organisations have been pushing for a total renewal of the CASA board and the recent Aviation Safety Regulatory Review recommended sweeping reforms at the regulator after accusing it of adopting “an across-the-board hardline philosophy’’.

CASA caused a stir recently when it revealed without a formal announcement the that former Brindabella Airlines owner Jeff Boyd had been appointed the authority’s deputy chairman.

Mr Truss said there had been a good response to Mr Boyd’s appointment. “I think the remaining appointments, I’m hoping, will be equally favourably received,’’ he said. “What the previous board perhaps lacked was the practical aviation experience and we’ll be dealing with that in the appointments yet to come.

“But you still need to have *people with the skills to run a large organisation and with the kind of background that’s necessary to ensure that it works properly as a business as well as a regulator.’’

Mr Truss on Friday announced that former Brisbane Airport Corp CFO Tim Rothwell and ex-Australian Rail Track Corp chief ex*ec*utive David Marchant would join the board of Airservices Australia. He also appointed existing board member Tony Matthews, currently chairman of Airservices’ safety committee, as deputy chairman.

A director of the Regional Aviation Association of Australia, Mr Matthews has more than 40 years’ experience in the industry and has worked as a manager and pilot with organisations such as the Royal Flying Doctor Service and Qantas regional airlines. He has been a member of the board since June 2012.

“Mr Mathews’s significant aviation experience makes him well suited to serve as deputy chair building on his important role as the chair of the board’s safety committee,” Mr Truss said.

Mr Rothwell was CFO at Brisbane Airport for almost 20 years before his departure last year and has been on various boards.

Mr Marchant chaired the Rail Industry Safety and Standards Board and was a managing director for Lend Lease Infrastructure Services and director of the *Hunter Valley Coal Chain Co-*ordination Co.

Mr Truss said both Mr Marchant and Mr Rothwell brought extensive expertise in transport, infrastructure investment, fin*ance, governance and risk management to the board.
So miniscule has a pulse & is aware of the growing number of IOS/aviation elephants in the room - CHECK.

Paragraph 2 of the "K" post on the 'MoP Stakes' perhaps deserves a 'Selleys moment' post on the Senate thread, so I'll flick past para 2. Likewise para 3-5 but para 6 and the despicable FF take/attack on CVD pilots still very much troubles me...

Throughout the history of the Oz aviation regulator, exposure to possible 'liability' has nearly always been the underlying primary concern, under the 'iron ring' this concern has manifested itself to an extreme level of 'liability paranoia' and consequently negatively effects all the decision making processes by FF in their administration & regulation of aviation safety in this country.

However with the Avmed 180 on CVD pilots I think there is an additional element, that was previously merely paid lip service to by the iron ring, that is ICAO compliance.

Incidentally the CVD pilot matter is not the only regulatory issue that CAsA suddenly appears to have had an attack of the ICAO guilt's.. Recent examples can be seen in..the draft of CAAP 235A (Multi-Engine Aeroplane Minimum Runway Width); CAAP 235-2(2) (Child carriage/restraint in aircraft); draft of Manual of Standards Part 61 – Flight Crew Licensing; and perhaps certain sections of the NPRM 1202OS – Fatigue Management for Flight Crew.

Much like the CVD matter the CAsA/media announcements on these policy/regulatory changes almost always starts with the words.."in line with...or alignment of..ICAO"

Example from a couple of days ago:
...Australia Brings Helicopter Landing Site Guidance in Line with ICAO
Jul 21, 2014 - 15:39 GMT

Australia has released new guidance material on helicopter landing sites as part of its efforts to bring standards in line with those of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO). The new guidance material is also designed to help helicopter operators transition to new Australian regulations that are under development as part of the country’s lengthy regulatory reform…

...New guidance material from CASA on helicopter landing sites has been released as part of a transition to new regulations and alignment of Australian standards with those of ICAO. The new material encourages the adoption of the new standards in new landing site construction but does not require upgrade of existing helicopter facilities...
All passing strange indeed....from a regulator who normally couldn't give a rat's arse about being compliant with ICAO (refer the huge list of notified differences H18/14)...

MTF..

ps Surmising..could it be that RED has got wind of a pending friendly visit from ICAO to perhaps review the progress of his much laboured over & beloved SSP (Annex 19)..

Word of advice RED until your FF/ATsB minions understand the concept of 'Just Culture' & are willing to embrace this philosophy, you can write all the flowery words you like in your SSP manual but it will continue to amount to 'Just Words' instead of 'Just Culture'....

Last edited by Sarcs; 25th Jul 2014 at 03:03.
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Old 25th Jul 2014, 10:08
  #951 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: May 2013
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sarcs this is all total codswallop.
if these people really bring so much experience to the board why don't we ever see any evidence of it?
why are CAsA so perpetually stupid that the only safe flying option is to ignore all their waffle and get on with it.

if CAsA and the ATSB ceased to exist tomorrow for at least 6 months would anyone notice?
it is like the airfields in england with control towers that aren't manned on sundays. more flying occurs on sundays than the entire rest of the week.

as the chinese say, the mountains are high and the mandarin is a long way beyond them.
(meaning that they ignore his overbearing presence totally)

to think that Truss is so stupid that he actually thinks that the current direction CAsA is taking is actually desired.
What a fckuwit you are Truss. you've blown 300,000,000 dollars so far. how much more can the country afford?
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Old 25th Jul 2014, 15:50
  #952 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Australia
Age: 49
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A SEARCH for a suitable replacement for outgoing Civil Aviation Safety Authority head John McCormick still has “some time to run,’’ according to Deputy Prime Minister Warren Truss.
A recruitment company is putting together a short list of candidates for interview by a panel of CASA board members and the head of the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development Mike Mrdak.
Hard to believe this is taking so long. Were they expecting an internal candidate to get the gig? Thought it was a 5 year appointment expiring August?

Anybody know when the senators get their Mops heard? Could just cause some ripples. Need to get beer and popcorn.

Last edited by halfmanhalfbiscuit; 25th Jul 2014 at 15:54. Reason: Grammar
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Old 25th Jul 2014, 22:35
  #953 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Styx Houseboat Park.
Posts: 2,053
Who's up who, and who's paying.

HMHB "Hard to believe this is taking so long. Were they expecting an internal candidate to get the gig? Thought it was a 5 year appointment expiring August?
Be hard pushed to find (or appoint) an internal candidate; any decent DAS must start at management level and clean out the coop; it's really very dark and dirty in there. It's to be hoped that various parts of the IOS have not been storing data, gathering evidence and joining the dots for the new DAS to consider when selecting his 'team'. I'd bet Pel Air was a mere bagatelle compared to the media holocaust which could conceivably follow if any form of blind eye treatment of those issues, particularly those emanating from the Pel Air or other notable fiascos was spotted. The Senate committee is certainly not letting these matters slide by and the new boy must consider this. These matters must, as a matter of conscience and clarity, be openly and fairly addressed: if the new boy intends to be on the square, with industry that is.

The selectors really do need to get it right, because if the lid comes off when the FAA or ICAO are paying attention and the world is very focussed on matters of aeronautical safety – things can go pear shaped very quickly. That you can bet on and this gummermint doesn't need that level of aggravation, noise and publicity. What price Qantas then, Australia relegated to ICAO Cat 2?, and ICAO do need a scalp or two right now, being very sensitive to public comment on their past ancestry, present value and future worth. Now that is a big apple cart to upset.

No, there may be a desire for an internal acolyte; but that can't happen. No amount of posturing, pressing the flesh and posing as qualified at RAS gatherings and other notable events can protect those who need it from a public thrashing. The bad apples have been clearly identified and if the new DAS won't throw them out then it becomes a matter for the consumer to deal with. Tick tock – indeed...

This is not an easy fix, both the Senate and miniscule's report confirm this. A band aid and an aspirin is no solution where major surgery is required, just won't do. From the heady heights of the board room, to the junior FOI visiting the smallest flight school, things must be seen to change, for the better.

By the by – Thursday 14 or Friday 15 for DAS announcement is heavily backed. Time is running short and needs must, when the devil drives.

Toot toot.

Last edited by Kharon; 26th Jul 2014 at 19:34. Reason: Is it just me – or does Truss look like Blinky Bill in that photo?
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Old 26th Jul 2014, 10:46
  #954 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
Location: Downunda
Posts: 559
Ferryman;
By the by – Thursday 14 or Friday 15 for DAS announcement is heavily backed. Time is running short and needs must, when the devil drives.
'K', could very well be. I haven't heard any internal talk about the announcement date, but a whisper coming out of the corridors is that they may announce a temporary internal DAS while they continue finalising the search and appointment of the new Kahuna. The Gov'mints issue apparently is that all three DAS's roles, the CAsA structure, and the Board are complete shite. A lot more than the replacement of one DAS is required, so the Miniscule has much to do and his very robust supply of turd polish seems to have run very dry.

Tick tock

Last edited by 004wercras; 26th Jul 2014 at 10:50. Reason: I think the Miniscule looks more like a scrub turkey...gobble gobble
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Old 26th Jul 2014, 12:09
  #955 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jul 2010
Location: sydney
Posts: 1,383
"Is it just me – or does Truss look like Blinky Bill in that photo"


"I think the Miniscule looks more like a scrub turkey...gobble gobble"



Na Kharon & 004, look at the prominent eyebrows, the sloping back forehead, no neck, no chin...a few thousand years, some archaeologist digging up an ancient graveyard will conclude that Neanderthals lived amongst us!! we probably bred with them!!...Oh good grief..and people wonder why he's thick!! its in the genes!!
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Old 27th Jul 2014, 10:05
  #956 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Jun 2011
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A SEARCH for a suitable replacement for outgoing Civil Aviation Safety Authority head John McCormick still has “some time to run,’’ according to Deputy Prime Minister Warren Truss. A recruitment company is putting together a short list of candidates for interview by a panel of CASA board members and the head of the Department of Infrastructure and Regional Development Mike Mrdak.
Perhaps Gary Harbor the Consultant will be assisting in the process?

And after the short list is ratified and internal interviews are undertaken, who will be on the internal selection panel? This guy perhaps;

http://au.linkedin.com/pub/roger-chambers/9/b7/80b

Last edited by 004wercras; 27th Jul 2014 at 10:10. Reason: Chasing wabbits
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Old 27th Jul 2014, 10:38
  #957 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Nov 2011
Location: Australia
Age: 49
Posts: 547
Lots of interesting departures in 2010.

Passing strange how bullying and harassment keeps raising its head. Even CVD is looking at harassment.

Whoever becomes the next head of casa those with unsuccessfully resolved issues need to ask for reconsideration.
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Old 27th Jul 2014, 20:03
  #958 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Oct 2010
Location: Styx Houseboat Park.
Posts: 2,053
Get on with it; for pities sake.

It's not really an Australian thing, but in the UK, November the fifth is 'Guy Fawkes night'. The fellah was 'not amused' by the delays and prevarication of the government, ran out of patience and thought it would be a fine thing to put a bomb under them; see if he could wake 'em up. (Not accurate but it will suffice).

I wonder how much longer the industry is prepared to be patient with the minuscule; before someone jumps out of the pipe and slippers cupboard; screaming with frustration just to see if they can wake him up. From the very top to the humblest of grass roots the industry is on 'tenterhooks', so many decisions in abeyance just waiting for him to blink. Part 61 is just one major change which needs to be addressed, and quickly. Because if it passes into 'law', as it stands; things are going to get really ugly, very quickly. The rule was written with the intention of doing away with subjective 'dispensation' and to remove the 'whim' of local FOI from the decision process. The way things are only those who are prepared to curry favour can secure a 'dispo' which leaves the whole thing wide open to the potential shout of corruption.

A decision on the WLR must be made – a dynamic industry cannot be held in stasis; everyone desperately wants the reform and the changes it will bring. Truss and his hypnotist know full well that the board and the top three layers of CASA management cannot be allowed to continue as they did when Albo gave McComic 'carte blanche' to become the big R regulator. Albo is, thankfully, along with his mate a thing of history; the minuscule has had more than enough time to sort out a plan, the materials are there so why FFS are we sitting about idle.

We are, normally, a relatively civilised, conservative crowd; Shirley we don't have to resort to the (turn your volume down)
.

Last edited by Kharon; 27th Jul 2014 at 20:58.
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Old 28th Jul 2014, 09:23
  #959 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Dec 2000
Location: Australia
Posts: 1,055
Recommendation 12.

The Civil Aviation Safety Authority delegates responsibility for the day-to-day operational management of airspace to Airservices Australia, including the designation of air routes, short-term designations of temporary Restricted Areas, and temporary changes to the classification of airspace for operational reasons.
Have heard a rumour CASA may not support this recommendation, though why staff in their airspace regulation office in CBR would be involved in the designation of air routes and short term designations of temporary restricted areas I don't know.

Air routes are to assist flight planning and ATC traffic handling, and temporary restricted areas tend to be for such things as police sieges and other short notice emergency situations, which one would think should be handled by ATC as part of their real-time airspace management.
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Old 28th Jul 2014, 18:17
  #960 (permalink)  
 
Join Date: Aug 2004
Location: Melbourne, Australia
Posts: 7,305
Midnight:

Have heard a rumour CASA may not support this recommendation, though why staff in their airspace regulation office in CBR would be involved in the designation of air routes and short term designations of temporary restricted areas I don't know.
Why should CASA be involved? Simple really, because it creates jobs for CASA staff and management positions for CASA managers.

That includes:

Executive Manager
Airspace and Aerodrome Regulation Division
I would have thought however that according to the aerodrome owners, such staff could be better used visiting aerodromes on a regular basis.
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