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ATC intake requirements

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ATC intake requirements

Old 9th Jul 2012, 11:15
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ATC intake requirements

Hi, I am hoping to gain some information regarding the ATC training process. My husband begins his ATC training later this year and so far we have undergone all testing/medicals and received confirmation today that his CASA medical was all clear and the certificate was posted out this afternoon. He missed out on the May intake as he had a delay in this certificate, so now trying to ensure there are no other obstacles in the way for the next intake. I know he has to also get an ASIC, is this something that Airservices organises? Will he need to apply for this before his training commences or does this occur when the training has been completed before the actual employment starts? anything else we should be prepared to organise before the training starts?
Any info would be helpful!
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Old 10th Jul 2012, 00:32
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The ASIC the company will organise. However if you want to speed up the process slightly (only by a matter of days and is not required) you can bring some information day one to help complete the forms.

Passport, addresses for the last 10 years (this is annoying). If you were overseas in those 10 years, a police record check from the countries (Australia you can just sign a form to release it).

The only other thing, you will get sent out is some pre course material before he starts. It does pay in my opinion to go through it a little. Its not essential, some people in my course did, some didn't, and everyone got through the theory portion unscathed. The first 8 or so weeks are very intensive, a massive amount of new information is being dumped on you. Anything you already have a vague understanding of beforehand will lessen that load.

Good luck to him.
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Old 10th Jul 2012, 05:55
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tsq88, I'm assuming your husband is the guy that was supposed to be on TWR63 with me, so he may have already been sent the thumb-drive with the pre-course material and received an email from Gordana with an ASIC application attached. Don't bother filling out the application, because he'll be given one on day one, but have a look at it to see what sort of information is needed.

As Mike said, some people go over the pre-study stuff, some don't. It doesn't really matter if you don't as the exam is only to get an idea of what level everyone is at, and probably to give trainees an idea of what the online exams are like.

Feel free to PM me if you want any more information.
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Old 13th Jul 2012, 11:11
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Originally Posted by mikethepomme
The only other thing, you will get sent out is some pre course material before he starts. It does pay in my opinion to go through it a little. Its not essential, some people in my course did, some didn't, and everyone got through the theory portion unscathed.
How are those people that 'didn't' traveling now?
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Old 13th Jul 2012, 13:14
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I think 4 or so didn't do the pre-course out of the 16 in my course, that I knew about. 1 left voluntarily midway through the course, other 3 are now rated controllers. And we lost 5 along the way (3 pulled the pin themselves)

As I said, not essential, but it will make the first few weeks easier in my opinion.
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Old 14th Jul 2012, 07:17
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Agreed, doing some initial study before you start saves you some time when you do start. In the very least, things sound familiar when they talk about them, or things you couldn't get your head around, you can be ready to ask questions about it.
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Old 16th Oct 2012, 07:11
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Why would you not?

We're given a pretty good bloody opportunity here that thousands would like and only hundreds get.

Seems pretty arrogant - and a little retarded - not to.
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Old 16th Oct 2012, 11:30
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Fact of the matter is this.

As kiwi chick has stated, Airservices receives a LOT of applications for ATC. It's one of the few places you can receive fre... paid training for a highly remunerated, professional career. The people who are accepted on the courses may be indivduals, but every single one of them is one thing at least. Smart.

As any one of these current or ex smart trainees will tell you, the ATC course is hard. It's like no other job you've ever done, regardless of your external experience. To pass, you are going to need enough motivation to really, really want the job, and even then it might not be enough.

Pre-course reading? No one is going to check whether you have done it. All I can say is that if I really, really wanted the job, I'd reckon I'd have the motivation to digest every bit of it out of sheer interest.

Besides, who knows, considering that trainees have been 'invited not to attend' after failing only 2 theory exams in the past, and more importantly that the lack of theoretical understanding is the undoing of a large number of trainees who crash out of the simulator, it might even make the difference between passing that very hard course and failing it.

But I digress.

No, you don't 'have' to*

* The, on average, 5 or 6 trainees out of each course of 12 who 'pursue different options' may disagree with that advice
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Old 16th Oct 2012, 11:30
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Why would you not?
Because some people, like myself, get the prestudy stuff less than a week before they start. Two people on my course picked theirs up from reception during their induction week.
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Old 16th Oct 2012, 12:39
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I didn't do any study and I'm a recently rated controller. It's really not necessary. Just have a skim over it and have an idea of the material which will make up the first eight weeks of the course.

I was more concerned with enjoying my last weeks of freedom, which I did.
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Old 17th Oct 2012, 10:52
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Well Steve, clearly I'm not talking about examples like yours. I'm talking about people who have the information but choose not to do it because they think "they'll be right".

Not Yet - maybe it wasn't necessary for you, maybe you're a genius. Being newly rated yourself, you will remember how hard the course study is. Why not give other prospective controllers support and the best chance they can have by encouraging them to do the pre-course study?

A lot of it happened to be stuff I've already learned as well, but I had no way of knowing that until I studied it. Why risk it??

As Hempy said, at least if I do have the misfortune to fail an exam, my instructors will know I've got the motivation and have been putting the work in and I hopefully won't get my a** kicked out the door without a backward glance.
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Old 17th Oct 2012, 11:44
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As Hempy said, at least if I do have the misfortune to fail an exam, my instructors will know I've got the motivation and have been putting the work in and I hopefully won't get my a** kicked out the door without a backward glance.
That's a really good point. If you do end up on review, because you're struggling with something, everything will be taken into account. If you've obviously put in the effort to learn as much as you can before you even started, then that will go in your favour when they're trying to decide what to do with you.

I was offered all kinds of help when I became "at risk". It came down to my decision to leave when I did.

Incidentally, while I was still doing the theory, we were told at one stage that there were 27 people on review at the academy, that's out of about 100 students. A lot of those will still get through their training.
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Old 17th Oct 2012, 12:07
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Obviously you guys are referring to Australia, but, as an ATCO from the UK, I suggest that kiwi chick's advise it pretty much spot on wherever in the world you are reading this thread.

Why would you not?

We're given a pretty good bloody opportunity here that thousands would like and only hundreds get.

Seems pretty arrogant - and a little retarded - not to.
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Old 24th Oct 2012, 11:44
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Read everything, as in... the entire Manual?

It's not at all what they use to teach the entire course, from where did you get that idea?

I wouldn't go *trying to* reading the entire manual before starting. I would suggest sticking to what they are telling you to stick to
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Old 30th Oct 2012, 00:46
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So Just trying to Clear a few things up, The ARM they give you, That is far from the depth of knowledge you will be taught at the training centre?
The information in the ARM is pretty much the same as the CPL training info. pitty I cant remember it!
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Old 31st Oct 2012, 10:23
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The ARM is fairly in-depth, yes - but it's by no means the primary basis for the course material.
  • You will get given two more documents when you arrive, which will be your bread & butter
  • There is a lot of reference to the AIP so it would help if you were familiar with navigating your way around it
  • There is a lot of extra course material presented to you in class, which most of us take notes on

The ARM is handy for the subjects not specific to ATC, ie Principles of Flight, Nav Aids, Met etc - more your generic aviation stuff.

It's been mentioned before but I'll mentiond it again - it is an INTENSIVE training pace - so make sure you have all loose ends tied up as you'll need to give it everything you have. And then some

Having said that - I'm loving every minute of it

Last edited by kiwi chick; 31st Oct 2012 at 10:24.
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Old 3rd Nov 2012, 11:51
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To all those wishing to be or are trying to be I honestly wish you the best of luck. This is 30+ years talking to you so take it as you find it. Get a bullet proof folder and keep a copy of every document, every check report, every assessment, every peice of nonsenical crap they give you....one day you will need it. It is a fantastic job however please remember you are a number and nothing else. Genuinely most Alm's + care but not everyone, so take care and I genuinely wish you well.

For the sceptics, you don't last 30+ years if you are not smart or good at what you do. The pay is OK but the reward is people want to talk about you and talk about your job. Yes the 'stress' question is perennial but so is the delight in telling them so is every job if you don't know what you are doing.

If you are rated people tell you in writing you are good. That is reward enough.
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