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jaytee54
5th Jan 2022, 14:23
Copied from news media
A Ryanair flight from Manchester (https://metro.co.uk/tag/manchester/?ico=auto_link_news_P1_LNK1) was forced into making an emergency landing in France after a fire reportedly erupted on board.

The flight FR4052 took off at 6.33pm yesterday and was due to land at around 9.30pm in Faro, Portugal.

But it had to make a rapid descent within an hour of departing, landing on the runway at Brest in north-west France at around 7.21pm.

Flight tracking software shows it descended from about 41,000ft to 6,725ft in seven minutes, prompting concern the plane lost cabin pressure.

Any more details available? Cause of fire revealed?

DaveReidUK
5th Jan 2022, 15:14
prompting concern the plane lost cabin pressure.

Among whom did this concern re cabin pressure manifest itself ?

DB777
5th Jan 2022, 15:15
Incident: Ryanair B738 near Brest on Jan 3rd 2022, technical issue (http://avherald.com/h?article=4f2a1f7e&opt=0)

jaytee54
6th Jan 2022, 08:36
Among whom did this concern re cabin pressure manifest itself ?
That;- "Flight tracking software shows it descended from about 41,000ft to 6,725ft in seven minutes, prompting concern the plane lost cabin pressure."
is from a news media. I suppose they put that in because an emergency descent is traditionally the response to a sudden loss of cabin pressure.
It's also the right thing to do with a fire on board.
The crew did well.

jaytee54
6th Jan 2022, 08:38
Incident: Ryanair B738 near Brest on Jan 3rd 2022, technical issue (http://avherald.com/h?article=4f2a1f7e&opt=0)
Thank you for the link.
Still no information on the type/location/cause of the reported fire.

DaveReidUK
6th Jan 2022, 08:58
I'm guessing it was a false indication, rather than something actually burning, as the aircraft in question attempted to position back to Stansted on Tuesday morning, a few hours after the incident.

It got as far as pushing back, then 5 minutes later was towed back onto the stand. AFAIK, it's still there at Brest as I write.

lederhosen
6th Jan 2022, 10:22
One possibility is that the problem reoccurred on engine start (for example a strong smell of burning or reappearance of smoke). Other than the engine fire loops and smoke detectors in the toilets I am not sure what you mean by false indication DaveReidUK. On Ryanair we can probably exclude inflight entertainment wiring but there are still plenty of things (mostly electrical) that can malfunction and would discourage you from wanting to takeoff without a more thorough check. I don’t know Brest, but I doubt it is teeming with 737 engineers. In any case it sounds like the crew did a good job.

RB Thruster
6th Jan 2022, 11:58
Sounds like a very good working of the situation by the crew. Full marks to them. My daughter is a RYR cabin crew supervisor and believe me they are all well trained to work all sorts of scenarios, most of which happen in the cabin from time to time. I know the flight deck guys do lots of repeat training for just this sort of eventuality. Ryanair's business model is to provide a reliable service, which I have used many times without a hitch.

DaveReidUK
6th Jan 2022, 12:06
One possibility is that the problem reoccurred on engine start (for example a strong smell of burning or reappearance of smoke). Other than the engine fire loops and smoke detectors in the toilets I am not sure what you mean by false indication DaveReidUK. On Ryanair we can probably exclude inflight entertainment wiring but there are still plenty of things (mostly electrical) that can malfunction and would discourage you from wanting to takeoff without a more thorough check. I donít know Brest, but I doubt it is teeming with 737 engineers. In any case it sounds like the crew did a good job.

No argument with any of the above.

It goes without saying that I too have the utmost respect for Ryanair crews' professionalism.

Union Jack
6th Jan 2022, 12:30
I'm guessing it was a false indication, rather than something actually burning, as the aircraft in question attempted to position back to Stansted on Tuesday morning, a few hours after the incident.

It got as far as pushing back, then 5 minutes later was towed back onto the stand. AFAIK, it's still there at Brest as I write.

Now that's what I call "informed and informative"!:D

Jack